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Angela Murphy

ALT-C 2012 - - 0 views

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    Piloting of toolkit
sanjib tiwari

M-learning adoption: A perspective from a developing country | Iqbal | The Internationa... - 0 views

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    Mobile learning or m-learning has been defined differently in different studies, which indicates that m-learning is still in an evolving phase (Peng et al., 2009). M-learning has been defined as "e-learning using mobile devices and wireless transmission" (Hoppe et al., 2003; Chang et al., 2003). Two important aspects of m-learning are its ubiquity and mobility. Ubiquitous computing is access to computing technologies whenever and wherever they are needed and mobility can be defined as learning on the go (Peng et al., 2009). While e-learning is mostly dependent upon desktop personal computing (PC) technology, m-learning is dependent upon mobile devices (Orr, 2010).
sanjib tiwari

The Mobile Learning Edge - Tools and Technologies for Developing Your Teams - 0 views

  • Mobile medical devices and apps are popping up all over. Doctors are incorporating them into their practices to be more effective and efficient. Patients are using them to monitor specific aspects of their health, fill in gaps in their medical care, and take more responsibility for their well-being. Both doctors and patients are finding that mobile devices and apps can provide a fast and efficient way to stay in touch and exchange information.

    The mobile health technology market–including devices, applications, and services–is expected to exceed $8 billion by 2018, according to research company GlobalData. That’s up from $500 million in 2010, a 44% compound annual growth rate. The rapid growth is being fueled by the increasing availability of a variety of healthcare applications.

    This growth offers opportunities for developers, clinicians and patients alike. But along with those opportunities come several obstacles to contend with. Depending on the type of app, developers will have to jump through all sorts of hoops to get FDA approval. Similarly clinicians sometimes face resistance from IT managers when they want to bring their own devices into the enterprise setting. And patients are faced with a long list of mobile apps, some of which offer more hype than help.

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    Mobile medical devices and apps are popping up all over. Doctors are incorporating them into their practices to be more effective and efficient. Patients are using them to monitor specific aspects of their health, fill in gaps in their medical care, and take more responsibility for their well-being. Both doctors and patients are finding that mobile devices and apps can provide a fast and efficient way to stay in touch and exchange information.

    The mobile health technology market-including devices, applications, and services-is expected to exceed $8 billion by 2018, according to research company GlobalData. That's up from $500 million in 2010, a 44% compound annual growth rate. The rapid growth is being fueled by the increasing availability of a variety of healthcare applications.

    This growth offers opportunities for developers, clinicians and patients alike. But along with those opportunities come several obstacles to contend with. Depending on the type of app, developers will have to jump through all sorts of hoops to get FDA approval. Similarly clinicians sometimes face resistance from IT managers when they want to bring their own devices into the enterprise setting. And patients are faced with a long list of mobile apps, some of which offer more hype than help.
sanjib tiwari

Designing_mLearningSample.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

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    This book provides a comprehensive basis for you to take advantage of
    mobile learning. It approaches mobile learning from a fundamental perspective,
    helping you understand and appreciate the rich opportunities
    that mLearning presents. The book briefly reviews the history of learning
    from a broad perspective and then goes on to survey the breadth
    of devices available in today's market, equipping you with appropriate
    ways to think about and pursue mobile learning. mLearning requires
    some new perspectives, and a variety of ways to think differently about
    the opportunities are presented to help shake up your thinking in productive
    ways. The book addresses the process of designing, delivering,
    and deploying mobile solutions, along with organizational pragmatics,
    to guide you through your mobile projects. Finally, discussions of
    strategic implications and a review of coming directions keep you prepared
    for the future. Examples help ground the concepts throughout
    the book.
sanjib tiwari

04_Armatas.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

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    In recent years universities have made significant investments in corporate technology systems
    to support various aspects of students’ studies and learning. These include gateways and
    learning management systems, all of which work on the assumption of attracting or “pulling”
    students into the online environment of the university. On the other hand, students come
    increasingly equipped with mobile devices, most notably mobile phones, which allow quick and
    easy communication and information sharing. These devices are an emerging phenomenon of
    significance for online teaching and learning as they represent opportunities for technology
    solutions where students can be primed and supported in novel ways in their university
    education. The challenge is one of achieving a balanced and sustainable use of corporate
    systems designed to “pull” students into the learning environment, and mobile technology
    solutions which can push information out to students, so that each adds value to and
    complements the other. This paper examines how this balance might be achieved in the context
    of work being undertaken in one University with major commitments to e-learning.
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    Using mobile technologies to enhance learning in higher education
sanjib tiwari

Williams-concise.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

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    Universities are being swamped by waves of emergent technologies and the emergence of iPads is the latest ‗state-of-the-art' mobile device to receive attention. While a number of iPad trials and initiatives have been conducted within the confines of classrooms, for example, Bond University, University of Melbourne and Adelaide University (Brand & Kinash, 2010; Jennings et al 2010; Cross, 2010); far fewer have been conducted in the field, see Duke University's use of iPad as a field research tool (Winograd, 2010). This study reports a faculty's trial to explore how far iPads could be integrated into a field setting for training of paramedic students in Wilderness Medicine. As it turned out, the remote setting for the exercise presented a number of challenges for the coordinators. Questions that needed to be considered included how ―mobile‖ is the iPad?, How can it be used to support and enhance students' learning in the field?, How far could the iPad be extended where Internet connectivity is intermittent? The iPad trial highlighted a lack of a ―common language‖ within the faculty as a basis to collaborate and design learning activities. It provided impetus for an ongoing series of conversations amongst the coordinators and others in the Faculty about design approaches and the need for a pedagogical framework to integrate technologies that support teaching and learning activities.
sanjib tiwari

1-s2.0-S0164121211001610-main.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

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    Modern smart mobile devices offer media-rich and context-aware features that are highly useful for
    electronic-health (e-health) applications. It is therefore not surprising that these devices have gained
    acceptance as target devices for e-health applications, turning them into m-health (mobile-health) apps.
    In particular, many e-health application developers have chosen Apple's iOS mobile devices such as iPad,
    iPhone, or iPod Touch as the target device to provide more convenient and richer user experience, as
    evidenced by the rapidly increasing number of m-health apps in Apple's App Store. In this paper, the top
    two hundred of such apps from the App Store were examined from a developer's perspective to provide
    a focused overview of the status and trends of iOS m-health apps and an analysis of related technology,
    architecture, and user interface design issues. The top 200 apps were classified into different groups
    according to their purposes, functions, and user satisfaction. It was shown that although the biggest
    group of apps was medical information reference apps that were delivered from or related to medical
    articles, websites, or journals, mobile users disproportionally favored tracking tools. It was clear that
    m-health apps still had plenty of room to grow to take full advantage of unique mobile platform features
    and truly fulfill their potential. In particular, introduction of two- or three-dimensional visualization and
    context-awareness could further enhance m-health app's usability and utility. This paper aims to serve
    as a reference point and guide for developers and practitioners interested in using iOS as a platform for
    m-health applications, particular from the technical point of view.
sanjib tiwari

ScienceDirect.com - Computers & Education - Mobile learning: A framework and evaluation - 0 views

  • Wireless data communications in form of Short Message Service (SMS) and Wireless Access Protocols (WAP) browsers have gained global popularity, yet, not much has been done to extend the usage of these devices in electronic learning (e-learning). This project explores the extension of e-learning into wireless/handheld (W/H) computing devices with the help of a mobilelearning (m-learning) framework. This framework provides the requirements to develop m-learning applications that can be used to complement classroom or distance learning. A prototype application was developed to link W/H devices to three course websites. The m-learning applications were pilot-tested for two semesters with a total of 63 students from undergraduate and graduate courses at our university. The students used the m-learning environment with a variety of W/H devices and reported their experiences through a survey and interviews at the end of the semester. The results from this exploratory study provide a better understanding on the role of mobile technology in higher education.
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    Wireless data communications in form of Short Message Service (SMS) and Wireless Access Protocols (WAP) browsers have gained global popularity, yet, not much has been done to extend the usage of these devices in electronic learning (e-learning). This project explores the extension of e-learning into wireless/handheld (W/H) computing devices with the help of a mobilelearning (m-learning) framework. This framework provides the requirements to develop m-learning applications that can be used to complement classroom or distance learning. A prototype application was developed to link W/H devices to three course websites. The m-learning applications were pilot-tested for two semesters with a total of 63 students from undergraduate and graduate courses at our university. The students used the m-learning environment with a variety of W/H devices and reported their experiences through a survey and interviews at the end of the semester. The results from this exploratory study provide a better understanding on the role of mobile technology in higher education.
  •  
    Wireless data communications in form of Short Message Service (SMS) and Wireless Access Protocols (WAP) browsers have gained global popularity, yet, not much has been done to extend the usage of these devices in electronic learning (e-learning). This project explores the extension of e-learning into wireless/handheld (W/H) computing devices with the help of a mobile learning (m-learning) framework. This framework provides the requirements to develop m-learning applications that can be used to complement classroom or distance learning. A prototype application was developed to link W/H devices to three course websites. The m-learning applications were pilot-tested for two semesters with a total of 63 students from undergraduate and graduate courses at our university. The students used the m-learning environment with a variety of W/H devices and reported their experiences through a survey and interviews at the end of the semester. The results from this exploratory study provide a better understanding on the role of mobile technology in higher education.
Sharon Rees

mLearning: Anytime, anywhere learning transcending the boundaries of the educational bo... - 0 views

  • In the age of our mobile learning, an impending onus is placed on educational institutions to embrace this technological innovation that is widely accepted, used, and available globally. The clear societal value of mobile technology as a productivity tool for engagement, creation, and collaboration has generated a new need for education to revisit existing instructional paradigms constrained by physical walls and time. Mobile learning (mLearning) creates a venue to promote a culture of participation where learners and leaders alike can engage in combined efforts with multiplicative outcomes of greater success. This article explores the factors that national, state, and local educational organizations must understand in order to make steps toward successful integration of mLearning technology. Characteristics necessary for effective and efficient use of mLearning strategies for educators are also examined.
  • An annual report, by The New Media Consortium, reveals that mobile learning and cloud computing are poised to reach widespread adoption in schools in one year or less, with game-based learning and open educational content not far behind (Devaney 2011).
  • Options like eLearning, and home-based learning are attracting students away from traditional settings at every level of education. The at-your-own-pace, convenience of space, and often lower costs these alternative educational settings offer appeal to an increasingly growing learner base.
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Mobile Devices are defined by several criteria: Form, connectivity, and state.
  • The mLearning environment is at-you-own-pace, just in time, and on-demand, not limited by a hard line connection and with the equipment that is often cheaper than a desktop and/or laptop computer.
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    Dissatisfaction with the status quo: may come from teachers who are not motivated to consider change in their teaching procedures.
     
    2.
    Knowledge and Skills Exist: a teacher must possess the competencies to teach students the use of these tools
     
    3.
    Resources are available: tools and relevant materials are accessible to assist learners to acquire learning objectives.
     
    4.
    Time is available: Paid time. Teachers need time for in-service training; they need time to revise existing teaching plans; they need time to practice with new materials; they need time to try out and evaluate new teaching procedures.
     
    5.
    Rewards or Incentives Exist for Participants: Why should anyone change? If current practice is going reasonably well, why risk new techniques? Whatever the reward, intrinsic or extrinsic, it should be there in some form.
     
    6.
    Participation is Expected and Encouraged: Shared decision making, individuals should be involved in the decisions that will affect them. Participation may occur at many levels: during problem identification. During consideration of alternative solutions, and during decision making when new programs or approaches are adopted.
     
    7.
    Commitment by Those who are involved: Administrators should provide clear and visible support that endorses implementation.
     
    8.
    Leadership is Evident: Leaders should insure that the necessary training is given and the materials to do the job are easily available; they are available for consultation when discouragement or failure occur; and they continually communicate their enthusiasm for the work at hand.
  • Through a review of past empirical studies, Hew and Brush (2007) found a total of 123 barriers in providing technology integration barriers, the authors classified them into six main categories: (1) resources, (2) knowledge and skills, (3) institution, (4) attitudes and beliefs, (5) assessment, and (6) subject culture. The greatest attribute of successful diffusion of innovation, which transcends all other aspects, is value. The merit or worth (value) placed on an innovation by a community is directly related to its ability to inform educational practice. Through usage and personal adoption, the whole educational community (administrators, teachers, student, and parents) has placed high value on trending mobile technology.
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    In the age of our mobile learning, an impending onus is placed on educational institutions to embrace this technological innovation that is widely accepted, used, and available globally. The clear societal value of mobile technology as a productivity tool for engagement, creation, and collaboration has generated a new need for education to revisit existing instructional paradigms constrained by physical walls and time. Mobile learning (mLearning) creates a venue to promote a culture of participation where learners and leaders alike can engage in combined efforts with multiplicative outcomes of greater success. This article explores the factors that national, state, and local educational organizations must understand in order to make steps toward successful integration of mLearning technology. Characteristics necessary for effective and efficient use of mLearning strategies for educators are also examined.
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