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Weiye Loh

Our Greatest Political Novelist? : The New Yorker - 0 views

  • Science fiction is an inherently political genre, in that any future or alternate history it imagines is a wish about How Things Should Be (even if it’s reflected darkly in a warning about how they might turn out). And How Things Should Be is the central question and struggle of politics. It is also, I’d argue, an inherently liberal genre (its many conservative practitioners notwithstanding), in that it sees the status quo as contingent, a historical accident, whereas conservatism holds it to be inevitable, natural, and therefore just. The meta-premise of all science fiction is that nothing can be taken for granted. That it’s still anybody’s ballgame.
  • Robinson argues that, now that climate change has become a matter of life and death for the species, it’s time for scientists to abandon their scrupulous neutrality and enter into the messy arena of politics. Essentially, Robinson attempts to apply scientific thinking to politics, approaching it less like pure physics, in which one infallible equation / ideology explains and answers everything, than like engineering—a process of what F.D.R. once called “bold, persistent experimentation,” finding out what works and combining successful elements to synthesize something new.
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    "When we call literary writers "political" today, we're usually talking about identity politics. If historians or critics fifty years from now were to read most of our contemporary literary fiction, they might well infer that our main societal problems were issues with our parents, bad relationships, and death. If they were looking for any indication that we were even dimly aware of the burgeoning global conflict between democracy and capitalism, or of the abyssal catastrophe our civilization was just beginning to spill over the brink of, they might need to turn to books that have that embarrassing little Saturn-and-spaceship sticker on the spine. That is, to science fiction.2"
Ashley Nelson

Unleash Your Imagination - FanFiction.Net - 0 views

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    A website that is dedicated to making sure that you got the ending you wanted to your favorite show. People can write and make up stories using characters that have already been created like Harry Potter or Batman.
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    This is the site that I refer to in my blog.
Gideon Burton

My avatar, my self: identity in ... - Google Books - 2 views

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    Good background on identity and its application to new media in chapter two.
Krista S

6 Maps of Digital Desires: Exploring the Topography of Gender and Play in Online Games - 1 views

  • Women in many MMOs perceive the game
    culture rather than the game mechanics to be the primary deterrent to poten-­
    tial female gamers
  • On average,
    respondents spend twenty-­two hours each week in an MMO. The median was
    twenty hours per week—the equivalent of half a workweek. There were no
    significant gender or age differences in usage patterns; players over the age of
    forty play on average just as much as players under the age of twenty
  • While about 27 percent of female players were introduced to the game by a
    romantic partner, only 1 percent of male players were introduced in this way.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • Overall, about 25 percent of players play
    an MMO with their romantic partner. Female players are more likely to be
    playing with a romantic partner than male players (see figure 6.1). About two-­
    thirds of female gamers are playing with a romantic partner, while less than
    one-­fifth of male gamers are
  • Men are allowed relatively free access to online games, but a
    woman’s presence in an online game is seen as legitimate only if it occurs via a
    relationship with a man.
  • It isn’t the case that women play only for socializing or that men play
    only to kill monsters. On the other hand, there are gender differences in these
    self-­identified motivations. Male players score higher in the Advancement,
    Mechanics, and Competition motivations, while female players score higher
    in the Relationship and Customization motivations. There were very small or
    no gender differences in the other five motivations—Socializing, Teamwork,
    Discovery, Role-­Playing, and Escapism.
  • In a recent survey, I asked female gamers about
    what they saw as potential deterrents to female gamers in the MMO they
    played. Almost every respondent cited the proportions and clothing options
    of the female avatars as problematic.
  • To a certain extent, this encourages players to think about women as
    token spectacles rather than actual players.
  • More important, many female players have learned that it is danger-­
    ous to reveal your real-­life gender in MMOs because they will be branded as
    incompetent and constantly propositioned; In other words, they must either
    accept the male-­subject position silently, or risk constant discrimination and
    harassment if they reveal that they are female
  • Also, there are very
    few other places (in physical or virtual worlds) where high-­school students are
    collaborating with professors, retired war veterans, and stay-­at-­home moms
Krista S

The demographics, motivations, and derived experiences of users of massively multi-user... - 0 views

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    Male players were significantly more likely to be driven by the Achievement and Manipulation factors, while female players were significantly more likely to be driven by the Relationship factor. Also, the data indicated that users derived meaningful relationships and salient emotional experiences, as well as real-life leadership skills from these virtual environments. MMORPGs are not simply a pastime for teenagers, but a valuable research venue and platform where millions of users interact and collaborate using real-time 3D
    avatars on a daily basis.
Amanda Giles

The Multitasking Generation -- Printout -- TIME - 0 views

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    They're e-mailing, IMing and downloading while writing the history essay. What is all that digital juggling doing to kids' brains and their family life?
Amanda Giles

Keeping True Identity Online Becomes Battle - NYTimes.com - 0 views

  • But in this more narcissistic Internet era, people who were once happily anonymous view themselves as online minicelebrities with their own brands to promote.
  • vanity addresses
  • accounts on sites like Twitter and Facebook tend to show up at the top of the list when people search the Web
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • his is a new world that we are having to step into in order to protect our brand, and they did not give us a huge window of time to prepare for it
becca_hay

193031_759372088_789375107.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 0 views

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    Great article concerning adolescent identity online.
Amanda Giles

The will to technology and the ... - Google Books - 0 views

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    Heidegger, Nietzche, and Marx seem to be the best psychological/philosophical sources for defining identity in the light of social media advances. I haven't worked through this whole article, but it seems like a good source for quotes on identity that can say whatever you want them to mean, you know?
Amanda Giles

I'm So Totally, Digitally Close to You - Clive Thompson - NYTimes.com - 2 views

  • Facebook and Twitter may have pushed things into overdrive, but the idea of using communication tools as a form of “co-presence” has been around for a while. The Japanese sociologist Mizuko Ito first noticed it with mobile phones: lovers who were working in different cities would send text messages back and forth all night — tiny updates like “enjoying a glass of wine now” or “watching TV while lying on the couch.” They were doing it partly because talking for hours on mobile phones isn’t very comfortable (or affordable). But they also discovered that the little Ping-Ponging messages felt even more intimate than a phone call.
  • capable
  • A lot of this is just social norms catching up with what technology is capable of.”
  • ...18 more annotations...
  • ambient awareness
  • very much like being physically near someone
  • paradox of ambient awareness
  • insignificant on its own
  • he little snippets coalesce into a surprisingly sophisticated portrait of your friends’ and family members’ lives
  • Facebook and Twitter may have pushed things into overdrive, but the idea of using communication tools as a form of “co-presence” has been around for a while. The Japanese sociologist Mizuko Ito first noticed it with mobile phones: lovers who were working in different cities would send text messages back and forth all night — tiny updates like “enjoying a glass of wine now” or “watching TV while lying on the couch.” They were doing it partly because talking for hours on mobile phones isn’t very comfortable (or affordable). But they also discovered that the little Ping-Ponging messages felt even more intimate than a phone call.
  • the growing popularity of online awareness as a reaction to social isolation
  • human groupings naturally tail off at around 150 people: the “Dunbar number,” as it is known. Are people who use Facebook and Twitter increasing their Dunbar number, because they can so easily keep track of so many more people?
  • Constant online contact had made those ties immeasurably richer, but it hadn’t actually increased the number of them; deep relationships are still predicated on face time, and there are only so many hours in the day for that.
  • If you’re reading daily updates from hundreds of people about whom they’re dating and whether they’re happy, it might, some critics worry, spread your emotional energy too thin, leaving less for true intimate relationships.
  • Parasocial relationships can use up some of the emotional space in our Dunbar number, crowding out real-life people.
  • hey can observe you, but it’s not the same as knowing you.”
  • people in their 20s who were in college when Facebook appeared and have never lived as adults without online awareness. For them, participation isn’t optional. If you don’t dive in, other people will define who you are.
  • if only to ensure the virtual version of you is accurate, or at least the one you want to present to the world.
  • he dynamics of small-town life,
  • If anything, it’s identity-constraining now
  • result of all this incessant updating: a culture of people who know much more about themselves
  • t’s like the Greek dictum to “know thyself,” or the therapeutic concept of mindfulness.
Heather D

Erikson, Identity - 0 views

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    This is from the psychoanalyst Erikson, who coined the phrase "identity crisis". He argues that identities can be fragmented, but, through history and community, identities are able to be formed during adolescents.
Heather D

Digital Natives » Identity - 0 views

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    Blog about social media and identity. Comments on trend toward unifying identity and the related problems. Also talks about online anonymity.
Amanda Giles

Executive Summary | Pew Internet & American Life Project - 0 views

  • Only 6% of the adult population has no one with whom they can discuss important matters or who they consider to be “especially significant” in their life.
  • contrary to the considerable concern that people’s use of the internet and cell phones could be tied to the trend towards smaller networks, we find that ownership of a mobile phone and participation in a variety of internet activities are associated with larger and more diverse core discussion networks. (Discussion networks are a key measure of people’s most important social ties.)

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    Social networking decreases social isolation.
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