Skip to main content

Home/ Developing Transnational Literacies/ Group items tagged postcolonial

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Bill Brydon

Ben Conisbee Baer Spivak Lessons Cultural Critique - 0 views

  •  
    "The questions that animate Sangeeta Ray's engaging new book on Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak bear upon teaching and learning. The push and pull of being both student of Spivak's work and teacher of that work in the classroom and in the medium of the book are palpable from the first pages. We begin with a heading of "Partial Beginnings," and soon the "impossible" task of a book on Spivak is invoked (1). "[H]ow would I write her without diminishing her presence?" (1) asks Ray, facing, in fact, the double bind confronting every teacher: how to respond responsibly to the subject they have to teach. As Ray points out, Spivak calls attention to the play in Derrida's French between répondre à and répondre de that formalizes several options here. Thus, "give an answer to," "answering to," "being answerable for" (Spivak, "Responsibility," 61; Ray, 72).1 None is predictably the right thing. Caught in this double bind, the teacher is left without a reliable device with which to calculate what her answerability to the material to be taught should be. So we receive "a version of the many possible books that were discarded and rewritten" (Ray, 1). Maybe it all sounds a bit dramatic, but in fact it's an experience of everyday life: like everyone, the teacher must decide how to go on, but every "instant of decision is a madness . . . a decision of urgency and precipitation, acting in the night of nonknowledge and nonrule" (Derrida, "Force of Law," 255). In her continuously reflexive engagement with the texts of Spivak, Ray does not cease reminding her readers that the urgent, productively anxiety-inducing scene of pedagogy is acted out in those texts."
Bill Brydon

The uniqueness of the Brazilian case: a challenge for Postcolonial Studies - Postcoloni... - 0 views

  •  
    "This article contends that the effectiveness of Postcolonial Studies in the Brazilian Academy is inseparable from an understanding of the singularity of Portuguese colonization in Brazil, responsible for the ethnic and cultural formation of the country and for many of the forms taken by its social and economic development, from colonial and monarchic days to the present. Since postcolonial criticism illuminates and is illuminated by the cultural production of the past and present, in the comparison and confrontation of the different colonial systems and their aftermath, Postcolonial Studies may substantially contribute to the research on identity and other crucial issues-in the Brazilian case, notably the problematic of the so-called minority discourses, native cultures and the Afro-descendant legacy vis-à-vis the European heritage."
Bill Brydon

Enacting Decolonized Methodologies The doing of research in educational communities - 1 views

  •  
    "Indigenous scholars have debated the impact that researchers and the act of researching have on Native and Indigenous people and communities. Although literature on this subject has grown, little has been written explicitly laying out the doing of research with these communities. The authors seek to articulate their doing by drawing upon the essential research principles and standards set by scholars. The authors seek to examine their work as education researchers in three different international contexts-Kenya, Cambodia, and "Indian country" in the United States-highlighting research practice shaped by context, relationship, and discourse emergent in their investigations of schooling, language revitalization, and scientific knowledge access. The authors reflect, analyze, and summarize their actions of decolonizing research that were present or particularly challenging cross-culturally, in each context. Examples of common action in the projects include relinquishing control, reenvisioning knowledge, cultivating relationships, and purposeful representation of communities. Finally, the authors connect their actions to the principles and standards set by scholars and discuss lessons learned."
Bill Brydon

Geopolitics of sensing and knowing: on (de)coloniality, border thinking and epistemic d... - 1 views

  •  
    "This essay offers an introduction to the 'decolonial option'. The author begins by setting his project apart from its European contemporaries such as biopolitics and by tracing the historical origins of his project to the Bandung Conference of 1955 that asserted decolonization as the 'third way', beyond Soviet communism and liberal capitalism. Decoloniality needs to emphasize itself once again as a 'third way'. This time it has to break the tandem formed by 'rewesternization' (championed by Obama's administration and the EU) and 'dewesternization' (represented by so-called emergent countries). The decolonial option embraces epistemic disobedience and border thinking in order to question the behaviour of world powers. Ultimately what is at stake is advancing what the author calls global political society."
Bill Brydon

Contours of Learning: On Spivak - Parallax - Volume 17, Issue 3 - 0 views

  •  
    "Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak's long career as teacher, theorist and activist has been characterised by a sustained commitment to pedagogy, and in particular by an awareness of how the dilemmas and problems that teaching throws up - whether in the classrooms of subaltern communities in West Bengal or in the seminar rooms of Columbia University - can offer a beginning for theoretical reflection. Such problems, which often serve as anecdotal starting points in her essays as Spivak describes moments of problematic encounter with resistance, confusion, privilege and silence, often work to trip up, in enabling ways, the kinds of paradigms that theory might otherwise want to impose, whether onto notions of cultural, social or gender difference, or onto ideas of development and globality. They are occasions for Spivak to draw attention to the ideological conditions in which differing forms of education (elementary and tertiary, Southern and Northern, public and private) operate, sutured as they are in their different ways to the nation-state. Yet an equally longstanding insistence of Spivak's work, from earlier essays such as her review of Derrida's Limited Inc, 'Revolutions that as Yet Have No Model' (1980) through to later works such as Other Asias (2008) has been that the classroom, whether located in rural West Bengal or in New York, offers a crucial site for the training of the imagination into the possibility of a different, collective political life of the future."
Bill Brydon

Missing Bodies: Troubling the Colonial Landscape of American Academia - Text and Perfor... - 0 views

  •  
    Subjugated bodies continue to be missing from classrooms, faculty meetings, and educational structures everywhere. Where are the excluded bodies? Where is the untheorized visceral experience of everyday discrimination? Possibilities of inclusiveness must be viscerally felt, not simply disembodiedly spoken. Merely claiming to be a progressive teacher-writer isn't enough to achieve a decolonizing praxis. This claim needs to come from an embodied performance in the classroom, a place where teachers and students alike can perform the scars of oppression on their bodies. Teacher and student bodies, in-between the colonial and postcolonial experience, can then become more present in teaching and praxis.
Bill Brydon

"Colonial" and "Postcolonial" Views of Vietnam's Pre-history - 0 views

  •  
    Until recently, northern Vietnam was believed to be a receiver or a loan culture of a unidirectional diffusion and migration from the advanced Chinese civilization. By the early 1980s, a new prehistory of northern Vietnam was becoming increasingly apparent. Yet, new discoveries by both Vietnamese and Western scholars possess existing biases. Interestingly, as a response to the above, today's Western scholars are attempting to "rescue" the "casualties" of nationalist history in Vietnam. However, it is not clear whether this new schema would only carve out a topic of expertise for Western historians or only further marginalize particular Vietnamese nationalist histories that did not necessarily constrain "independent histories".
Bill Brydon

"Globalization, Pedagogical Imagination, and Transnational Literacy" by Ezra Yoo-Hyeok Lee - 0 views

  •  
    "In his article, "Globalization, Pedagogical Imagination, and Transnational Literacy," Ezra Yoo-Hyeok Lee explores the juncture of comparative literature, globalization and postcolonial studies as to how creative writers, literary critics, and cultural theorists respond to globalization and its challenges. Arjun Appadurai expounds that globalization has demanded new research conceptualization and invention in academia. Subsequently, Lee investigates methods through which educators and scholars in comparative literature take up such a demand. In turn, Lee proposes a transnational literacy which offers a responsible form of cultural explanation, through which to explore the interrelations between the national and the postcolonial or global paradigms, both emergent as frames of current cultural change. Lee also offers a close reading of critical works by Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Diana Brydon, and David Damrosch to elaborate on the concept of transnational literacy and to consider ways of circumnavigating around Eurocentrism in comparative literary and cultural studies."
Bill Brydon

Decolonizing the evidence-based education and policy movement: revealing the colonial v... - 0 views

  •  
    There is a growing body of literature discussing evidence-based education, practice, policy, and decision-making from a critical perspective. In this article, drawing on the literature and policy documents related to evidence-based education in the USA, Britain, and Canada, I join this critique and offer an anticolonial perspective. I argue that proponents of evidence-based education unknowingly promote a colonial discourse and material relations of power that continue from the American-European colonial era. I posit that this colonial discourse is evident in at least three ways: (1) the discourse of civilizing the profession of education, (2) the promotion of colonial hierarchies of knowledge and monocultures of the mind, and (3) the interconnection between neoliberal educational policies and global exploitation of colonized labor. I conclude with the decolonizing implications of revealing some of the colonial vestiges in educational policy, research, and neoliberal reform
Bill Brydon

Postcolonial interventions and disruptions: Contesting cultural practices - Internation... - 0 views

  •  
    Postcolonial theory, with its interpretations of race, racialization, and culture, offers us a set of powerful analytic tools to meet the epistemological challenge of giving voice to subjugated knowledges and the capacity to address and uncover social relationships within organizations. In particular, it opens up new ways of framing issues within organizational practices, enabling us to imagine new possibilities and practices. This paper suggests that the integration of postcolonial perspectives into cross-cultural management and its theorizing enhances and enriches its discursive import. The paper also attempts to sketch out a methodology to ground the intricate relationship between culture, practice, and organizations.
Bill Brydon

Radical Teacher - Introduction: Teaching Post-Colonial Literatures in the Age of Empire - 0 views

  •  
    Are colonialism and imperialism over and done with? On its face this would seem to be the case, at least as measured by the United Nations' membership roll call. From Martinique to Angola, Tasmania to Lebanon, Cambodia or Zanzibar, previously colonized co
Bill Brydon

INSCRIBING SUBJECTS TO CITIZENSHIP: Petitions, Literacy Activism, and the Performativit... - 0 views

  •  
    This essay examines how activists in rural southern India have sought to reshape the field of political communication by encouraging lower-caste women to submit written, signed petitions to district-level government offices, and so represent themselves to
Bill Brydon

Auspicious reasoning: can metadesign become a mode of governance? - Postcolonial Studies - 0 views

  •  
    As society must very soon adopt more ecological ways of living, this article argues that a primary duty of all citizens should be to envision better ways of living. However, the way we tend to reason remains an obstacle to change. This is because most of
Bill Brydon

Revisiting The Master's Tools: Challenging Common Sense in Cross-Cultural Teacher Educa... - 0 views

  •  
    According to Kevin Kumashiro (2004), education toward a socially just society requires a commitment to challenge common sense notions or assumptions about the world and about teaching and learning. Recalling Audre Lorde's (1984) classic essay, "The Master
Bill Brydon

Teaching and modes of knowing - Postcolonial Studies - 0 views

  •  
    Sanjay Seth's sophisticated new book, Subject Lessons: The Western Education of Colonial India, revolves around this theme of contestations around modernity in the realm of education, and the title is misleading to the extent that it foregrounds 'western'
Bill Brydon

Decolonial pedagogy and the ethics of the global - Discourse: Studies in the Cultural P... - 0 views

  •  
    An ethical and democratic globality, and the kind of education that would contribute to it, are only possible in the context of a recognition of the relations of power that have shaped history, and in particular the political, cultural, economic, and epis
Bill Brydon

Studies in American Indian Literatures - Publishing Sámi Literature-from Chri... - 0 views

  •  
    Publishing in the Sámi languages has always been difficult. The Sámi are currently spread across four countries, Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Russia. There are nine different Sámi languages, some of them with only a few speakers. The Sámi publishing indus
Bill Brydon

LANGUAGE POLICY, 'ASIA'S WORLD CITY' AND ANGLOPHONE HONG KONG WRITING - Interventions: ... - 0 views

  •  
    Hong Kong's official language policy of 'biliteracy' (Chinese and English) and 'trilingualism' (Cantonese, Putonghua, English), announced after the reversion to China in 1997, claims to address actualities of language use in the territory, remove inequiti
1 - 18 of 18
Showing 20 items per page