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1963: Closing of the Graphite Reactor | Frank Munger's Atomic City Underground | knoxne... - 0 views

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    In this remember-when photograph, a big crowd gathered on Nov. 4, 1963 to witness the shutdown of the historic Graphite Reactor at Oak Ridge. Note the relative dearth of women in the crowd. The Graphite Reactor, of course, was built during World War II as a prototype facilitiy for production of plutonium. It was the world's first continuously operated nuclear reactor and went critical for the first time in the pre-dawn hours of Nov. 4, 1943. The reactor operated for 20 years, contributing greatly to the nation's development of radioisotopes for medicine and other uses and for pioneering work with neutron-scattering experiments, etc.
anonymous

Photos of Pumpjacks and Oil Wells - 0 views

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    History of the Yates Field. Much like the story of "There Will Be Blood". Iraan Texas
anonymous

Oilfield History, The Yates Oil Field Near Iraan In West Texas - 0 views

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    There will be blood. History of the Yates Field oilfield in Iraan Texas.
Energy Net

The American Spectator : Carter Energy Solutions, Part II - 0 views

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    "We know the right thing to do," President Obama said about renewable energy at his press conference Tuesday. "We've known the right choice for a generation. The time has come to make that choice and act on what we know.…We have achieved more in two months for a clean energy economy than we have done in perhaps 30 years." Thirty years. Let's see, that would be 1979, right? Hmmm… wasn't that the year -- yes, that was when Jimmy Carter finally got his Grand Energy Plan through Congress, setting us the road to corn ethanol, the Synthetic Fuels Corporation and a host of other harebrained schemes.
Energy Net

The Associated Press: Bush, issue by issue - 0 views

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    A look at the ups and downs of George W. Bush's presidency on some of the biggest issues of the day:
Energy Net

Peak Energy: The Lost History of American Green Technology - 0 views

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    Bruce Sterling points to Alexis Madrigal's project to create a history of American renewable energy development - The Lost History of American Green Technology. You'll soon be able to cruise around a map of green tech history in America and scroll through a timeline of the major events in the history of the industry. "Right now, I'm working on building an American Green Technology Historical Registry that will mark out the places that have been important for wind, solar, hydrokinetic, geothermal, and other renewable power sources. You will be surprised when you see the results. It's not just northern California, it's Ohio and Boise, Florida and Death Valley, Texas and Montana, York, PA, and Rutland, Vermont.
Energy Net

1959: Your Watt-Sucking World of Tomorrow : TreeHugger - 0 views

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    This system will let your wife run her home by push-buttons in a few short years. For example, with this Home Electronic Center setup your wife will dial the electronic controls the night before to wake you gently to music in the morning. The system will shut the window when you get up or turn up the heat or air conditioning.... RCA engineers call this wonder system the Home Electronic Center Kid, or HECK. While your wife snoozes on, silent HECK is busy preparing your breakfast-chilled juice, hot coffee, eggs and toast-which will be served by HECK as you approach the kitchen table.
Energy Net

Peak Energy: The 1872 Energy Crisis - 0 views

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    The New York Times has a review of a book on the history of horse power (Horses at Work: Harnessing Power in Industrial America), including a segment describing an energy crisis caused by an outbreak of horse flu in the 1870's - A World of a Different Color. Once upon a time, America derived most of its power from a natural, renewable resource that was roughly as efficient as an automobile engine but did not pollute the air with nitrogen dioxide or suspended particulate matter or carcinogenic hydrocarbons. This power source was versatile. Hooked up to the right devices, it could thresh wheat or saw wood. It was also highly portable - in fact, it propelled itself - and could move either along railroad tracks or independently of them. Each unit came with a useful, nonthreatening amount of programmable memory preinstalled, including software that prompted forgetful users once it had learned a routine, and each possessed a character so distinctive that most users gave theirs a name. As a bonus feature, the power source neighed.
Energy Net

The new nuclear abolitionists | Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists - 0 views

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    Twenty-five years ago, the Nuclear Freeze campaign mobilized hundreds of thousands of Americans to demand an end to the testing, production, and deployment of new nuclear weapons. At that time, advocating the complete abolition of nuclear weapons was a fringe position confined to a few utopians on the left. Even most antinuclear activists struggled getting past the "you can't put the genie back in the bottle" common sense of pundits and arms control experts.
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