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4 out of 5 want nuclear reactors scrapped in Japan - Yahoo! News - 0 views

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    "Tokyo, June 19 (ANI): Four out of five Japanese want the nation's 54 nuclear reactors to be decommissioned either immediately or gradually following the crisis that evolved after the earth-quake-cum-tsunami hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant on March 11, a poll has revealed.

    The Kyodo news agency quoted the Tokyo Shimbun daily poll as saying that only 14 percent respondents said that the reactors should continue operations, while 82 percent said that they should be decommissioned.

    A total of 54 percent of respondents said that the reactors should be decommissioned "while taking into account the power supply-and-demand situation," followed by 19 percent who want decommissioning to "start with ones undergoing periodic checks".

    Besides, nine percent demanded immediate scrapping of the nuclear plants, showing an absolute lack of confidence in the nation's atomic energy policy. (ANI)"
Energy Net

AFP: US support for nuclear power drops: poll - 0 views

Energy Net

Most of Russians against nuclear disarmament - poll | Defense | RIA Novosti - 0 views

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    "The majority of Russians (60 percent) are against further nuclear disarmament, with numbers in favor dropping significantly since the end of the Soviet era, the Russia Public Opinion Research Center (VTsIOM) said on Thursday.

    Half of Russians believe the country needs nuclear weapons to assure its security in case of war, according to VTsIOM's latest survey. A quarter said nuclear weapons should be preserved to demonstrate Russia's political power, with only 4 percent saying the stockpile is needed to counter U.S. military potential."
Energy Net

Debate: Does the discovery of a pipe bomb at Palo Verde Nuclear Power Plant indicate th... - 0 views

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    "The discovery of a pipe bomb at the Palo Verde Nuclear Power Plant indicates a need for enhanced security at all nuclear power plants. Nuclear power plants are prime targets for terrorists. The nuclear material used to make nuclear bombs can be obtained from nuclear power plants. The destruction of an active nuclear power plant can produce radiation that will cover over 100 miles and fallout that can drift for almost a thousand.

    Terrorists groups could capture a power plant and blackmail governments,steal the nuclear material then sell that material to rogue governments or other terrorist groups. Nuclear power plants if destroyed by terrorists, could kill thousands of people if large metropolitan areas are located within 20 miles of a plant."
Energy Net

Scots favour wind farms over nuclear power, says survey - Scotsman.com News - 0 views

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    "SCOTS are more in favour of using wind farms than nuclear power stations to produce electricity, a poll commissioned by EDF Energy has shown.


    * 69% of people polled were in favour of onshore turbines. Picture: Getty

    When asked in a YouGov survey about their support for different types of power plants, more than eight out of ten Scots backed offshore wind farms and 69 per cent were in favour of onshore turbines.

    However, fewer than half - 47 per cent - said they supported the idea of replacing existing nuclear plants when they closed in the poll, commissioned by the French nuclear power giant.

    Similarly, when questioned about their opinion of different energy sources for producing electricity, 74 per cent said their impression of wind farms was favourable, compared to just 43 per cent for nuclear."
Energy Net

The smallest thing can often make the biggest difference - Power Engineering International - 0 views

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    "A recent poll, conducted by Gallup on a sample of more than 1000 adults in the United States, found that 62 per cent of respondents supported the use of nuclear power.

    This in itself is not surprising since the majority of Americans have favoured the use of nuclear power to provide electricity since Gallup began asking about this topic back in 1994. Further, nuclear is responsible for a healthy 20 per cent of the US' power generation mix, and traditionally, unlike its European cousins, American citizens appear to be less squeamish about the potential dangers of nuclear power."
Energy Net

Helsingin Sanomat - Poll: Support for new nuclear reactor declines - 0 views

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    Nine out of ten want more wind energy

    "Public support for building a sixth nuclear generating facility for Finland has sharply declined in the past four years. Nevertheless, a poll commissioned by Helsingin Sanomat and conducted by Suomen Gallup indicates that more than half of Finns are still in favour of more nuclear construction.
    Only about a third of respondents would grant licences to all three applicants, while six per cent would grant licences to two of the applicant companies. "
Energy Net

VPR News: Poll Says Public Has Lost Trust In Yankee - 0 views

  • He said 71 percent of state residents say they are - quote - "less supportive now of Vermont Yankee, the nuclear reactor, than [they] were six months ago."
  • He said 71 percent of state residents say they are - quote - "less supportive now of Vermont Yankee, the nuclear reactor, than [they] were six months ago."
  • He said 71 percent of state residents say they are - quote - "less supportive now of Vermont Yankee, the nuclear reactor, than [they] were six months ago."
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    "A new poll shows Entergy Vermont Yankee has lost the trust of a majority of Vermonters.

    The poll says a radiation leak at the plant has severely eroded public support for the plant to operate after 2012.

    VPR's John Dillon reports:

    (Dillon) The poll of 802 Vermont residents was commissioned by the Civil Society Institute, a Massachusetts-based non profit that says it opposes nuclear power.

    The survey was taken just days before the Senate voted overwhelmingly to block Entergy Vermont Yankee's request for a 20-year license extension. "
Energy Net

Poll finds wary support for Nuclear Power - 0 views

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    ""A LITTLE NUKIE NEVER HURT ANYONE!" read a famous pro-nuclear message on the signboard of a Richland hotel three decades ago, when a trio of nuclear power plants were under construction at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

    Two of the reactor projects, beset by huge cost overruns, were abandoned in the early 1980s. But President Obama is signaling a revival of a technology that once threatened to melt down the economy of the Pacific Northwest.

    Public support is there -- with serious qualifications, according to a new national Angus Reid poll.

    The survey found that 48 percent of Americans support building more nuclear plants, with 34 percent opposed and 18 percent not sure. Advocacy of the atom was strongest among Republicans, with 60 percent backing more nukes."
Energy Net

Poll: Radioactive waste not welcome here - Salt Lake Tribune - 0 views

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    "Utahns strongly support a federal ban on importing radioactive waste from foreign nations.

    And, even more strongly, they oppose the disposal of thousands of tons of depleted uranium in their state.

    Whether they were Republicans or Democrats, men or women, members of the LDS church or not - the majority of registered voters who responded to a recent poll conducted for The Salt Lake Tribune objected to low-level radioactive waste coming to the state.

    The question made Grantsville resident Anne Watson recall the story of scientist Marie Curie, who died from exposure to the radioactive material she studied. "
Energy Net

Most Chileans Oppose Nuclear Power, Support Wind Energy, Says Survey - 0 views

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    "More than half of Santiago residents do not support nuclear energy as an energy source in Chile, according to a recent survey by the Universidad Diego Portales' center for energy and sustainable development. Further, 62 percent said they favor wind energy as the preferred source of energy. Around 25 percent said they favored nuclear energy.

    The survey was taken in light of the government's growing interest in nuclear energy. When citizens were asked about the risks posed by such projects, 54.8 percent cited nuclear energy's impact on health and the environment, 21.1 percent cited a possible lead of radioactive material and 18.6 percent cited risks associated with the lack of experienced professionals in the country.

    Opposition grew stronger when those surveyed were asked about possibly building a nuclear plant in the Metropolitan Region: 65 percent opposed and 18 percent were in favor."
Energy Net

Majority in Taiwan favors replacing nuke power with renewables - The China Post - 0 views

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    Nearly 70 percent of the population favors the notion of replacing nuclear power with renewable energy, while 50 percent think nuclear power should be maintained as an option, according to the results of a poll released Monday.

    However, Taiwan Power Company, the sole supplier of electricity in Taiwan, said that renewable energy may not be a realistic path as the average consumer would complain about its much higher price.

    In a telephone poll conducted by Shih Hsin University on randomly chosen citizens over the age of 20, it was found that 49.1 percent support nuclear power as one of the energy production options, while 69.9 percent favor replacing nuclear power with renewable and clean energy.
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    Nearly 70 percent of the population favors the notion of replacing nuclear power with renewable energy, while 50 percent think nuclear power should be maintained as an option, according to the results of a poll released Monday.

    However, Taiwan Power Company, the sole supplier of electricity in Taiwan, said that renewable energy may not be a realistic path as the average consumer would complain about its much higher price.

    In a telephone poll conducted by Shih Hsin University on randomly chosen citizens over the age of 20, it was found that 49.1 percent support nuclear power as one of the energy production options, while 69.9 percent favor replacing nuclear power with renewable and clean energy.
Energy Net

'Nej tak' to nuclear after all - 0 views

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    Danes don't support the use of nuclear power despite a poll indicating a majority is in favour

    A new study on attitudes towards nuclear power counterclaims one published two weeks ago, which demonstrated a majority support the use of the energy source, reports trade publication Ingeniøren.

    Two weeks ago, a Gallup/Berlingske Tidende newspaper poll claimed a majority of people supported the use of nuclear power. The new A&B Analyse poll, conducted for political news website Altinget.dk, shows there is considerable resistance to atomic energy.
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    Danes don't support the use of nuclear power despite a poll indicating a majority is in favour

    A new study on attitudes towards nuclear power counterclaims one published two weeks ago, which demonstrated a majority support the use of the energy source, reports trade publication Ingeniøren.

    Two weeks ago, a Gallup/Berlingske Tidende newspaper poll claimed a majority of people supported the use of nuclear power. The new A&B Analyse poll, conducted for political news website Altinget.dk, shows there is considerable resistance to atomic energy.
Energy Net

Almost 50% of Albertans 'conflicted' about nuclear power, report says - 0 views

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    More than a quarter of Albertans oppose allowing nuclear power plants to be built in the province, while almost half remain "conflicted" about the energy source, according to a new government report released Monday.

    And people north of Edmonton - were several nuclear plants have been proposed - were more likely to oppose building the plants, by around 32 per cent, compared to the Calgary region, at 24 per cent, was the least opposed.

    "Only those Albertans who hold consistently positive views of science and the nuclear industry - and are less concerned by the potential for negative consequences - actually want to see the government encourage nuclear proposals," said the report by Alberta Energy.
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    More than a quarter of Albertans oppose allowing nuclear power plants to be built in the province, while almost half remain "conflicted" about the energy source, according to a new government report released Monday.

    And people north of Edmonton - were several nuclear plants have been proposed - were more likely to oppose building the plants, by around 32 per cent, compared to the Calgary region, at 24 per cent, was the least opposed.

    "Only those Albertans who hold consistently positive views of science and the nuclear industry - and are less concerned by the potential for negative consequences - actually want to see the government encourage nuclear proposals," said the report by Alberta Energy.
Energy Net

BBC News - Is nuclear the low carbon future? - 0 views

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    With the Copenhagen climate conference under way, the UK government under pressure to cut carbon emissions and Wylfa on Anglesey shortlisted for a new nuclear power station, BBC Wales' environment correspondent Iolo ap Dafydd asks if nuclear is the low carbon answer to energy security in the future.

    Inside the ageing Wylfa plant there are four large turbines which are part of the process to produce electricity 24 hours a day.

    When fully operational, they produce enough electricity to power both Liverpool and Manchester simultaneously.

    With a predicted shortage of energy by 2015, should we build more nuclear power stations?
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    With the Copenhagen climate conference under way, the UK government under pressure to cut carbon emissions and Wylfa on Anglesey shortlisted for a new nuclear power station, BBC Wales' environment correspondent Iolo ap Dafydd asks if nuclear is the low carbon answer to energy security in the future.

    Inside the ageing Wylfa plant there are four large turbines which are part of the process to produce electricity 24 hours a day.

    When fully operational, they produce enough electricity to power both Liverpool and Manchester simultaneously.

    With a predicted shortage of energy by 2015, should we build more nuclear power stations?
Energy Net

Poll: Carolinians favor conservation over power plants - Charlotte Business Journal: - 0 views

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    A growing number of Carolinians say rising demand for electricity can be met through conservation rather than by building more power plants.

    That's a key finding of a new poll commissioned by Duke Energy Carolinas. And it reflects a distinct shift in public opinion from two years ago.

    In the latest poll, 43% of the 1,100 N.C. and S.C. residents surveyed say "people and companies will learn to conserve energy and use significantly less electricity." Only 30% say "government will give permission for more power plants to be built."
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    A growing number of Carolinians say rising demand for electricity can be met through conservation rather than by building more power plants.

    That's a key finding of a new poll commissioned by Duke Energy Carolinas. And it reflects a distinct shift in public opinion from two years ago.

    In the latest poll, 43% of the 1,100 N.C. and S.C. residents surveyed say "people and companies will learn to conserve energy and use significantly less electricity." Only 30% say "government will give permission for more power plants to be built."
Energy Net

Living with nuclear power: public views not as simple as we thought on Environmental Ex... - 0 views

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    A UK study provides the first contemporary investigation of public perceptions of nuclear power among residents living close to existing nuclear plants. It indicates that responses are not simply 'for' or 'against', but a complex 'landscape of beliefs' that will need complex communication from authorities about plans for new plants.

    Climate change and energy supply concerns have put nuclear power back on the policy agenda. For example, recent UK government policy proposes that new nuclear power stations should form part of the future UK energy mix(1). As in other countries, many of the candidate sites are those that have existing nuclear facilities.

    The study examined local response to nuclear power in two UK locations near power stations: Oldbury and Bradwell-on-Sea. It used a technique where participants sorted statements on nuclear power according to how the statements reflect their point of view.

    The analysis indicated that there are four different 'points of view':

    * Beneficial and safe. A belief that nuclear power brings both local and global benefits and the power station workers are trustworthy.
    * Threat and distrust. Nuclear power is unsafe and the government and the nuclear industry are not trustworthy.
    * Reluctant acceptance. Nuclear power is 'the best of a bad lot'.
    * There's no point worrying. An indifference to nuclear power and a belief that it is out of our control
    * These four unique points of view were found at both locations, indicating the results are likely to be reflected in other communities, at least in the UK. Most participants in the study held the first two views.
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    A UK study provides the first contemporary investigation of public perceptions of nuclear power among residents living close to existing nuclear plants. It indicates that responses are not simply 'for' or 'against', but a complex 'landscape of beliefs' that will need complex communication from authorities about plans for new plants.

    Climate change and energy supply concerns have put nuclear power back on the policy agenda. For example, recent UK government policy proposes that new nuclear power stations should form part of the future UK energy mix(1). As in other countries, many of the candidate sites are those that have existing nuclear facilities.

    The study examined local response to nuclear power in two UK locations near power stations: Oldbury and Bradwell-on-Sea. It used a technique where participants sorted statements on nuclear power according to how the statements reflect their point of view.

    The analysis indicated that there are four different 'points of view':

    * Beneficial and safe. A belief that nuclear power brings both local and global benefits and the power station workers are trustworthy.
    * Threat and distrust. Nuclear power is unsafe and the government and the nuclear industry are not trustworthy.
    * Reluctant acceptance. Nuclear power is 'the best of a bad lot'.
    * There's no point worrying. An indifference to nuclear power and a belief that it is out of our control
    * These four unique points of view were found at both locations, indicating the results are likely to be reflected in other communities, at least in the UK. Most participants in the study held the first two views.
Energy Net

Survey: Americans split over nuclear energy | Frank Munger's Atomic City Underground | ... - 0 views

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    A national poll of 800 residents conducted by the Polling Institute at Sacred Heart University found a pretty even split between those who think nuclear energy is very safe or somewhat safe (46.1 percent) and those who think it's very dangerous or somewhat dangerous (44.7 percent)..

    According to info distributed to the news media, Sacred Heart (based in Fairfield, Conn.) institute's poll found that a majority see nuclear waste as a danger, while they viewed wind as being the safest energy source. Also, about a third of the respondents thought that an increase in nuclear energy would lead to more nuclear weapons.

    Most of the polled indivdiuals supported the EPA's designation of CO2 as a public health threat.

    In a statement, Dr. Josh Klein, assistant professor in Sacred Heart's Department of Criminal Justice, said, "Americans are split about whether nuclear power is safe or not, and many people have specific security concerns about nuclear power. The two dangers that concern a majority of Americans are the problems with radioactive waste storage, a top criticism of nuclear power, and possible plant meltdowns.''
Energy Net

National Poll: Americans Split on Safety of Nuclear Energy - 0 views

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    - Most Support EPA Designation of Carbon Dioxide as Public Health Threat
    - Majorities See Danger in Nuclear Waste
    - Wind Energy Perceived as Safest
    - One-Third See More Nuclear Weapons as Plants Increase

    Fairfield, Connecticut - A new national poll of 800 residents by the Sacred Heart University Polling Institute found a nearly even split between those suggesting nuclear energy was very or somewhat safe (46.1%) and those who said somewhat dangerous or very dangerous (44.7%).
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