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Energy Net

Ditching EU Atomic Project After Japan May Strand $2 Billion - Businessweek - 0 views

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    " Bulgaria's 30-year-old plan to build a nuclear power plant in an earthquake-prone area on the Danube may become the European Union's first atomic project doomed by Japan's disaster, leaving a $2 billion hole in the ground.

    The EU's poorest member faces a "mission impossible" to finish the Russian-designed plant because the Fukushima accident will require it to borrow an extra $2.1 billion for improved safety measures and insurance, according to a report by the research group Balkans and Black Sea Studies Center of Sofia."
Energy Net

Fukushima-1: secrets revealed: Voice of Russia - 0 views

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    "The accident at Fukushima -1 in March this year was caused by defects in construction, both the former and the current senior engineers of the Tokyo Electric Power (TEPCO) - the company operating the Japanese nuclear power plant - told "The Wall Street Journal". Specialists say that emergency diesel-generators and switchgears were wrongly placed at the Fukushima-1 nuclear power plant.

    Only 50 per cent of the devices transmitting electricity from the generators to the reactors' coolers were well fixed, the TEPCO experts say. All the rest were destroyed by the earthquake and by the tsunami that followed it, which finally led to the wide-scale radiation leak."
Energy Net

Bangkok Post : Russia stops 50 radioactive cars from Japan - 0 views

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    Customs officials in far eastern Russia said Thursday they had stopped almost 50 secondhand cars shipped for sale from Japan that showed excessive radiation levels.


    A sign with the nuclear hazard symbol stands in front of cars from Japan in the eastern Russian city of Vladivostok on April 14. Customs officials in far eastern Russia said they had stopped almost 50 secondhand cars shipped for sale from Japan that showed excessive radiation levels.

    Customs officials stopped 49 cars with radiation levels up to six times above normal, while some vehicles had traces of the radioactive isotopes caesium-127 and uranium-238, said Roman Famin, who heads the regional customs' radiation monitoring department.

    The radioactive cars started arriving at the Vladivostok port 10 days ago, but the government consumer watchdog has not made a decision on what to do with the contaminated cars, Famin said at a briefing.
Energy Net

Interview: Scale of Chernobyl disaster understated: Ukrainian expert - 0 views

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    The scale of the Chernobyl disaster is not exaggerated and even understated," a victims representative and leading nuclear expert told Xinhua in an exclusive interview Wednesday.

    Alexander Zenchenko, the chairman of the Focal Alliance of Chernobyl Disaster Victims, also said the nuclear power plant catastrophe in Ukraine in 1986 and the current crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi plant in Japan were very different.

    Zenchenko, who is a famous Ukrainian nuclear chemist and physicist, is in a good position to know. He was rec
Energy Net

Most of Russians against nuclear disarmament - poll | Defense | RIA Novosti - 0 views

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    "The majority of Russians (60 percent) are against further nuclear disarmament, with numbers in favor dropping significantly since the end of the Soviet era, the Russia Public Opinion Research Center (VTsIOM) said on Thursday.

    Half of Russians believe the country needs nuclear weapons to assure its security in case of war, according to VTsIOM's latest survey. A quarter said nuclear weapons should be preserved to demonstrate Russia's political power, with only 4 percent saying the stockpile is needed to counter U.S. military potential."
Energy Net

Convicted scientist Syutagin forced to admit guilt in return for freedom and exile in s... - 0 views

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    "Russian scientist Igor Sutyagin, who was serving 15 years following a wrongful conviction on espionage charges, was Friday delivered together with three other convicted spies to Vienna and exchanged, in what appears to be the biggest US-Russian "spy swap" since the Cold War, for ten Russian individuals who have admitted earlier in New York to have been acting as agents of the Russian Federation. Maria Kaminskaya, 09/07-2010

    Information that Sutyagin, an innocent man who was imprisoned at the height of what became known as "spymania" in Russia, will be part of an exchange by which Russia will repatriate ten US-based agents has earlier been confirmed by his lawyer Anna Stavitskaya. His release became joyful news for Bellona, which is all too familiar with the dismal situation with human rights and the workings of the justice system in Russia, though the fact that Sutyagin was forced to sign a confession of guilt in order to walk free was another testimony that little has changed for the better."
Energy Net

The new bill on radioactive waste management in Russia: An analysis - Bellona - 0 views

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    "Bellona presents an analysis of the draft law "On Management of Radioactive Waste," currently under consideration in the Russian legislature. This position reflects the opinion shared equally by Bellona and experts from most ecological non-governmental organisations operating in Russia. Aleksandr Nikitin, 01/07-2010 - Translated by Maria Kaminskaya
    Foreword

    The draft Federal Law of the Russian Federation "On Management of Radioactive Waste" (hereinafter, the Bill) has been under preparation by Russian legislators for over ten years. At present, the bill is going through its second reading at the lower house of the Russian parliament, the State Duma.

    According to the requirements set forth by the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management, which Russia signed in Vienna in 1999 and ratified in 2005, countries that employ nuclear energy must have a regulatory and legal framework in place to ensure safe management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and radioactive waste. The proposed legislation will govern all legal relations arising in the field of management of SNF and radioactive waste. As an instrument to regulate such relations, the Bill is without doubt a necessity. Precisely how such relations will be regulated by the Bill in its current form, however, is a different matter. For the reader's convenience, the following analysis has been divided into three distinct parts detailing the potential ecological, social, and economical issues raised by the Bill. This analysis represents the opinion shared equally by Bellona and the majority of experts working with ecological non-governmental organisations in Russia.
    The ecological impact

    1. The fundamental ecological problem that arises with the passing of the Bill is that it will legalise the existing practice of injecting liquid radioactive waste (LRW) inside geological formations for disposal."
Energy Net

SPECIAL REPORT-Should BP nuke its leaking well? | Reuters - 0 views

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    "Not everybody is so sanguine about the Soviet experience. Speaking on condition of anonymity, an expert from Russia's largest oil exporter Rosneft (ROSN.MM), urges the United States to ignore calls for the atomic option. "That would bring Chernobyl to America," he says.

    Vladimir Chuprov from Greenpeace's Moscow office is even more insistent that BP not heed the advice of the veteran Soviet physicists. Chuprov disputes the veterans' accounts of the peaceful explosions and says several of the gas leaks reappeared later. "What was praised as a success and a breakthrough by the Soviet Union is in essence a lie," he says. "I would recommend that the international community not listen to the Russians. Especially those of them that offer crazy ideas. Russians are keen on offering things, especially insane things."

    Former Minister Mikhailov agrees that the USSR had to give up its programme because of problems it presented. "I ended the program because I knew how worthless this all was," he says with a sigh. "Radioactive material was still seeping through cracks in the ground and spreading into the air. It wasn't worth it.""
Energy Net

Russia floats barge for waterborne nuclear plant | Reuters - 0 views

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    "Russia on Wednesday took a big step toward the controversial creation of the world's first floating nuclear power station, putting a barge that will house the plant into the water.

    Environmentalists say Russia's plan to dot its northern coastline with floating nuclear power plants is risky.

    The head of Russia's nuclear agency Rosatom, Sergei Kiriyenko, said the plant would be "absolutely safe" and predicted "big interest from foreign customers.""
Energy Net

AFP: Russia furious over Cold War-style US spy arrests - 0 views

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    "Russia angrily hit back on Tuesday at US claims that it had smashed a Moscow-organised spy ring, saying the accusations were reminiscent of the Cold War and could damage efforts to improve relations.

    The US Justice Department said 10 "deep-cover" suspects, accused of infiltrating US policymaking for the Kremlin, had been detained on suspicion of seeking details of US nuclear weapons and foreign policy."
Energy Net

Russia's Atomflot reports ready for long-overdue decommissioning of old icebreakers, nu... - 0 views

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    "After a long period of inaction due to tight financing, the Russian nuclear fleet operator Atomflot gears up for decommissioning several of its old nuclear vessels - starting with the 1977-built nuclear icebreaker Siberia. Spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste have been removed from the ship, and works done to ensure the hull bottom is watertight. Next in line are the icebreaker Arktika and the nuclear maintenance vessels Lotta, Lepse, and Volodarsky. Alexey Pavlov, 29/06-2010 - Translated by Maria Kaminskaya

    Each nuclear icebreaker has its own finite useful life period - an estimated time frame that the vessel can remain in service. It is impossible to keep extending the life span of an icebreaker's various mechanisms without risking an increased incidence of equipment malfunctions and system failures. The first to be laid to rest on Atomflot's roster of nuclear icebreakers was the icebreaker Lenin: The veteran icebreaker is now permanently moored in the far northern city of Murmansk, retrofitted to function as a museum.

    Lenin's successors will be sent for complete dismantling, beginning with the Siberia. The vessel, which was put into commission in 1977 and broke Arctic ice until it was taken out of service in 1992, has been awaiting decommissioning for 18 years. Until very recently, Russia had no sufficient means to allocate to the costly procedure."
Energy Net

Floating NPP to be set afloat - BarentsObserver - 0 views

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    "The world's first floating nuclear power plant will be set afloat on Wednesday. The plant will be operational in the Russian Arctic by the end of 2012.

    The solemn ceremony marking the launching of the plant will take place at the Baltic shipyard in St. Petersburg on Wednesday June 30, reports the press office of Russia's State nuclear Agency Rosatom.

    After put on sea, the floating nuclear power plant, named Akademik Lomonosov, will be completed and undergo different stages of testing before it will sail to the north during the autumn 2012."
Energy Net

Russia, Kazakhstan ready to sign 'wide range' of nuke documents - Rosatom head | Ex-Sov... - 0 views

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    "Russia and Kazakhstan are on the brink of signing a number of documents on cooperation in the nuclear sphere, the head of the Russian atomic energy company Rosatom said on Saturday.

    Sergei Kiriyenko said while he was in Kazakhstan on Thursday, cooperation in the nuclear sphere was discussed between Russia and Kazakhstan.

    "A wide range of documents are on the deciding stage and the 'last leg' of these documents will be finished in a short period of time," Kirieyenko said at the sidelines of the International Economic Forum in St. Petersburg."
Energy Net

Russia to pay for construction of obsolete reactors at Ukraine's Khmelnitsky plant - Be... - 0 views

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    "Russia and Ukraine have signed an intergovernmental agreement to finish the construction of Reactor Units 3 and 4 at Ukraine's Khmelnitsky Nuclear Power Plant. This means Russia will effectively foot the bill for completing a long-obsolete project developed as far back as when the two nations were still part of the Soviet Union. Andrei Ozharovsky, 09/06-2010 Andrei Ozharovsky, 17/06-2010 - Translated by Maria Kaminskaya

    The agreement was signed on June 9 in the Ukrainian capital, Kiev, by Ukraine's Minister of Fuel and Energy Yury Boiko and Russia's head of the state nuclear corporation Rosatom, Sergei Kiriyenko.

    The deal sees Russia unfreezing the construction of Units 3 and 4 at Khmelnitsky Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) - a site located 40 kilometres from the city of Rovno, in Ukraine's Khmelnitsky Region. The plant was built in 1981."
Energy Net

georgiandaily.com - Moscow Uses 'Infamous' Ship to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel - 0 views

  • The United States Department of State recently declared that “the expansion of Russia in the area of nuclear energy could involve the appearance of new danger zones in the world.” Moreover, the department said, “it can lead to a new arrangement of forces in Europe, Asia and Africa and thus put at risk the strategic interests of the United States.”
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    "Moscow Uses 'Infamous' Ship to Move Spent Nuclear Fuel Even as It Announces Plans to Build More Nuclear Power Plants Abroad

    Paul Goble

    Staunton, June 15 - Russia's Atomic Energy Corporation is using a refitted ship that became "infamous for dumping liquid radioactive waste from the Soviet ice-breaker fleet in the Barents Sea," Barents Observer reports today, even as Moscow announces plans to dramatically expand its involvement in the construction of atomic power plants abroad.

    The "Serebryanka," the news agency reports, has picked up "the first load of spent nuclear fuel from the run-down storage facility" near the Norwegian border without Russian officials informing Oslo in advance as they had pledged to do (www.barentsobserver.com/first-shipment-of-highly-radioactive-waste-from-border-area.4793260-116320.html)

    Eldri Holo, an official at the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, told the news portal that "we expect to be informed about the dates for shipment of spent nuclear fuel." But she added that the first she had heard about this move was from the news agency rather than from the Russians. "
Energy Net

Law and disorder in Russia - Bellona - 0 views

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    "Ten years have passed since Alexander Nikitin was acquitted charges of treason and espionage by the Russian Supreme Court, which could have landed him in a jail cell for 20 years if not earned him the death penalty. But for the confusion of those years in Russia, Nikitin believes that he would not have been acquitted of the same charges, however innocent he was, in Russia today. Nikitin here tells of the events that took four years, eleven months and eight days. Alexander Nikitin, 14/06-2010 - Translated by Charles Digges

    I was arrested very early on the morning of February 6th 1996. It read like a page from Stalin's Russia. Someone rang the door and ordered me to come to an interrogation by the FSB, the Russian intelligence service (and the successor to the KGB). They said that I not need to take anything with me and my family should not worry because I would soon come home again.

    But I did not come home. Instead I found myself in a jail cell. The FSB's accusations against me turned out to be very serious: high treason and espionage. I was at risk for the death penalty. "
Energy Net

Russia's ARMZ plans to become top 3 uranium producer | Reuters - 0 views

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    "Russian state-controlled miner ARMZ wants to become one of the world's top 3 uranium producers after buying a controlling stake in Canada's Uranium One , General Director Vadim Zhivov said.

    "We view Uranium One as a company to ensure global growth for ARMZ and therefore as a platform for mergers and acquisitions," he told reporters on Wednesday.

    ARMZ added it had no plans to further increase its stake in Uranium One after closing the transaction, which will see the Russian firm own at least a 51 percent share."
Energy Net

Oil&Gas Eurasia | Remembering a Nuclear Explosion to Close a Gas Well in the USSR - 0 views

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    "A nuclear explosion was set off 37 years ago, near Krestishche village in Krasnograd district, Kharkiv Region. It was the first in Ukraine and probably the only one in the European part of the Soviet Union. Scientists had determined that a large gas condensate field in the area which was discovered in 1970 could hold up to 300 billion cubic meters of fuel. In 1971, 17 wells were already operating in the Krasnograd district. But an accident occurred when drilling a new well at the field in July 1971. Gas came to the surface before the well reached its planned depth and the force of the spewing gas condensate reached 400 atmospheres, throwing two workers into the air.

    Engineers took days deciding what to do to stop the well. The nearest village was just 500 meters away. Residents were told to not light any fires and to stay out of their homes and not turn on any lights. Unable to stop the gas, the engineers decided to light it. By the next day, the burning flare was tens of meters high. Several attempts were made during the next year to put out the fire. Filling the well with tons of concrete slabs did not work - they flew apart like toys. Such flares are normally put out by capping the well. But for this case, specialists from Moscow offered an original solution - an underground nuclear explosion."
Energy Net

URGENT: Radioactive ship reported sunk while moored near Russia's Murmansk, authorities... - 0 views

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    "Disturbing reports are coming from Russia that the former nuclear maintenance vessel Severka may have sunk at the wharf of a shiprepairing yard in Alexandrovsk (former Polyarny) on the Kola Peninsula, in close vicinity to the large administrative centre of Murmansk. Russian authorities have yet to confirm or deny the information.

    Before the 1990s, the Severka was used to move spent nuclear fuel in Soviet-produced shipping containers of the type TK-12 from Andreyeva Bay - the former naval base in the northwestern part of the Kola Peninsula - to a transshipment site in Murmansk dubbed Area SRZ-35. There, not far from the grounds of Atomflot, Russia's nuclear fleet operator, the spent nuclear fuel was reloaded into railway cars to be shipped off to the reprocessing plant Mayak in the Urals.

    The Severka was also equipped with special tanks for shipments of liquid radioactive waste."
Energy Net

Biography of a disaster: Chernobyl film in production - RT Top Stories - 0 views

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    "The worst man-made disaster in history took place at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine almost 25 years ago. It has inspired one of Russia's top screenwriter-directors to make a film based on the story.
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    "On Saturday", Aleksandr Mindadze's tragic exploration of the nuclear disaster, will go back to the events of 1986, when the notorious Number Four reactor suffered an unstoppable chain reaction."
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