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Randolph Hollingsworth

Nancy Isenberg - Sex and Citizenship in Antebellum America - 5 views

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    Professor Isenberg offers a powerful argument that the first organized US women's rights activists can be traced to the antebellum period, long before the 1920 milestone of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution.
Randolph Hollingsworth

KET | Living the Story | Jennie Hopkins Wilson - 3 views

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    Powerful video about a woman who lived during the violence of segregation and how everyday activities we take for granted today took great courage then. For more information about this time period in Kentucky's history, see George C. Wright's ground-breaking book _Racial Violence in Kentucky, 1865-1940: Lynchings, Mob Rule, and "Legal Lynchings."
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    This KET video will serve as the focus for the first of the UK AASRP Race Dialogues (www.uky.edu/AS/AASRP) held in the UK Student Center on Sept 16th 4:30-6 p.m.
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    The video on jennie and Alice Wilson is a powerful example of how standing up for what you believe in is the best thing a person can do. Jennie is a strong woman because of her childhood. Seeing her parents as slaves and as free people made an impression on her. This impression made her srong enough to raise foour children in Kentucky during segregation and send all four of them to college. Alice was strong enough to integrate into mayfield high school with 9 other children at the age of fourteen when no other black students would. After integrating she dealt with vocal abuse from white classmates, but never retaliated physically or vocally in a negative manner. Alice simply continued on with the importantt things in her life, the completion of school and the hopes of continuing onward to college.
Randolph Hollingsworth

Roaring 1920's Concert Extravaganza - 3 views

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    Some musical examples of the era of The New Woman, the flapper and the post-suffragist political climate.
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    How might this music of the 1920s reflect (or impact) the history of Kentucky women?
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