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Contents contributed and discussions participated by John Woodbridge

John Woodbridge

Ancient Roman DNA reveals modern malaria parasite - 1 views

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    Mosquitos may have killed nearly 400,000 people per year which may have helped lead to the collapse of the Roman Empire.
John Woodbridge

Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance . Renaissance . Index | PBS - 0 views

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    Information about Art, Warfare, Religion, Science & Architecture in Italy
John Woodbridge

Lost Language May Come Alive Again on Stone Slab Containing Etruscan Text - 0 views

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    The so-called lost language of Etruscan may come alive again. Inscriptions in the language that were recently discovered on stone slab, or stele, are set to be
John Woodbridge

The World in Play | The Metropolitan Museum of Art - 0 views

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    Middle Ages Games
John Woodbridge

Science reveals secret lives of mysterious decapitated gladiators - CNET - 0 views

  • At least 75 were adult male skeletons, all under the age of 45, around an inch taller than the Roman average and well built. This demographic alone is unusual for a Roman cemetery of the era. But the manner in which the remains were buried was oddest of all. The heads had been removed, placed in the graves on the chests or between the legs of the bodies.
  • Forensic work conducted on the bones revealed one man had been bitten by a large carnivore, such as a lion or bear, which were fought by gladiators in the arena. Another skeleton showed signs of a massive hammer blow to the head, a method of mercy killing delivered to badly wounded fighters.
  • The bones also showed that the men had much stronger right arms than left, which was normal for slaves trained to fight in the arena from childhood. In addition, the bones showed evidence of childhood stress and deprivation, which would be expected for gladiatorial slaves, and healed wounds that suggested lives well used to injury and fighting.
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  • Most of the skeletons sampled had similar genomes to those of a female Iron Age skeleton from Melton in East Yorkshire, suggesting that some of the men had lived most of their lives in Britain. And a small variation in isotope levels showed that some had started their lives elsewhere, but had been in Britain since early childhood.
  • One skeleton of the seven was a surprise, though. According to the genomic analysis, he was from the Middle East. He had grown up in what is now Palestine, Jordan or Syria, and migrated across to the UK as an adult
  • "It confirms the cosmopolitan character of the Roman Empire even at its most northerly extent."
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    Roman gladiators graves found in England
John Woodbridge

Backyard Bonanza: Medieval Outhouses and Roman Roads Unearthed - Yahoo News - 0 views

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    Ancient Roman settlement in England found underneath Medieval remains
John Woodbridge

Stonehenge: The earliest Ikea flat pack in history? - CNN.com - 0 views

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    That's the view of Mike Parker Pearson, professor of British later prehistory at University College London (UCL) who says some of the famous rocky slabs -- known as 'bluestones' -- may have first been erected in Wales and then moved on to England around 500 years later.
John Woodbridge

How a Medieval Philosopher Dreamed Up the 'Multiverse' - Yahoo News - 0 views

  • written by a philosopher named Robert Grosseteste — into English. Grosseteste was "one of the most dazzling minds of his generation, lauded by his successors as a mathematical genius, theologian, politician and church leader; he was the bishop of Lincoln from 1235-53,"
  • In Grosseteste's time, the dominant cosmological model was the one developed mainly by the Greek philosopher Aristotle. He postulated that there were nine planets (called spheres), one inside the other, with planet Earth at the center.
  • In De Luce, Grosseteste assumed that the universe was born from an explosion that pushed everything, matter and light, out from a single point — an idea that is strikingly similar to the modern Big Bang theory.
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  • matter and light were linked together
  • rapid expansion
  • light-matter crystallizing and forming the outermost sphere — the so-called "firmament" — of the medieval cosmos.
  • The medieval philosopher realized this problem, too. To deal with it, he added an extra reason to explain why there were "exactly nine celestial spheres plus one, an 'imperfect' Earth," Bower said.
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    Science
John Woodbridge

Archaeologists might have found bone of England's King Alfred the Great - Yahoo News - 0 views

  • Tests have shown that a pelvic bone found in a museum box is likely to have been either that of Alfred - the only English king to have the moniker "Great" - or his son King Edward the Elder.
  • The bone was found among remains dug up at a medieval abbey in Winchester, southwest England, the capital of Alfred's kingdom.
  • The discovery comes less than a year after British archaeologists discovered the missing body of King Richard III, the last English king to die in battle in 1485, under a council parking lot in the central English city of Leicester.
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  • Alfred, who ruled the Anglo-Saxon kingdom of Wessex, an area which covered much of southern England, from 871 until his death in 899.
  • Famed for military victories against ferocious Vikings who had invaded much of the north of the country, Alfred was buried at the Anglo-Saxon cathedral in Winchester but his remains and those of other royals were moved in 1100 by monks, ending up at the newly built Hyde Abbey. The abbey was dissolved in 1536 and the whereabouts of Alfred's remains and those of other members of his royal family thereafter became unclear.
  • human remains at the museum which had been discovered in a previous dig near the location of the high altar at Hyde Abbey between 1995 and 1999. Tests concluded the bone, about a third of a male pelvis, dated to between 895-1017 and belonged to a man aged between 26 and 45. As there were no other burials at the site in the Anglo-Saxon period, archaeologists concluded it had to belong to a member of the royal house of Wessex, and most probably due to the age, to either Alfred or his son.
  • However, more significantly, Alfred is regarded as laying the foundations for a unified England, and his passion for education and learning are seen a crucial in the development of the English language
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    Discovery of the remains of King Alfred the Great of England
John Woodbridge

Internet History Sourcebooks - 0 views

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    End of Rome, Early Christian Church, Byzantium, Crusades, Empire & Papacy, Medieval Church, Economic Life in Medieval Europe, Intellectual Life in Medieval Europe, Jewish Life in Medieval Europe. All very good descriptions, but the reading level is quite high
John Woodbridge

Hidden Histories « Categories « Archaeosoup Productions Archaeosoup Productio... - 1 views

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    select the video entitled childhood and at the 6:30 mark a discussion of how children lived then.
John Woodbridge

Horrible Histories New Spartan Girl - YouTube - 0 views

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    Short clip of how Spartan girls were treated and expected to act. Spartan culture was very militaristic
John Woodbridge

Battle-Bruised King Richard III Buried in Hasty Grave - Yahoo! News - 0 views

    • John Woodbridge
       
      Post-mortem means after death
  • post-mortem
John Woodbridge

The Mariners' Museum | EXPLORATION through the AGES - 0 views

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    Tools of navigation
John Woodbridge

The Mariners' Museum | EXPLORATION through the AGES - 1 views

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    Columbian Exchange and map making info
John Woodbridge

The Columbian Exchange - SchoolTube - 1 views

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    24 minute video very well done.
John Woodbridge

How native Americans hid in the Vatican for more than 500 years - Yahoo! News - 0 views

    • John Woodbridge
       
      Arbitrate- to conduct a peaceful calm discussion between two arguing parties.
    • John Woodbridge
       
      Chancelleries- government officials
  • created the work, which shows Jesus' Resurrection, in 1494, just a year after Columbus returned from his first journey of discovery across the Atlantic.
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  • The figures are men who seem to be dancing and are naked except for exotic-looking feather head dresses. One appears to have a Mohican-style haircut.
  • restoration experts who were cleaning a large fresco painted by the Renaissance master Pinturicchio.
  • The apartments were named after the notorious Rodrigo Borgia, who became Pope Alexander VI. He commissioned Pinturicchio and his assistants to paint several frescoes for the apartments, which are part of the Vatican’s Apostolic Palace.
  • abandoned after the death of Pope Alexander in 1503. Subsequent popes did not want to be associated with the scandal-ridden family. They were only reopened in 1889 by Pope Leo XIII, and are now used to display a collection of religious art.
  • Pope Alexander soon found himself playing a pivotal role in the New World discoveries – he had to arbitrate between the competing claims of Spain and Portugal.
  • he pope had himself painted into the lavish fresco – dressed in sumptuous golden robes, he is kneeling down on the left hand side, his hands clasped in prayer. He is clearly contemplating Jesus' resurrection, but he also appears to be directing his gaze at the tribesmen – ruminating, perhaps, on the enormous implications of Columbus’s historic discovery
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