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AMVital Nutrition

Ginger for Anxiety-Find Out If Ginger Can Help you out-AMVital - 0 views

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    Ginger for Anxiety: How Does it Work? If you suffer from anxiety, you've probably tried countless methods to help yourself feel better. Some people swear by medications like Xanax or Prozac, while others prefer to take a more holistic approach. If you're on the latter side of the spectrum, you may want to consider adding ginger to your diet. Read on for everything you should know about how this powerful root can help with anxiety! Especially, gingerol is what ginger owns its intrinsic antioxidant effects, which reduce oxidative stress markers. This is the effect that is equally responsible for the anti-inflammatory abilities described in ginger intake. Although, none of this supports the answer to our question: does ginger help with anxiety? To understand the effects of ginger on stress, we need to find out what it does to the brain to reduce anxiety. STUDIES ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF GINGER IN TREATING ANXIETY: Miscellaneous studies have revealed that ginger profoundly affects human cognition and brain function. For example, one double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 70 middle-aged Thai women found that ginger root extract improved cognitive function and memory. Other studies performed in rat brains saw ginger improved mental capacity "somewhat through the antioxidant action of the extract." How Does it Work? Some of the most optimistic studies concerning whether or not ginger does help with anxiety implicate serotonin. Mainly one of these underlying studies, served on rats, primarily studied the cellular action to decide why ginger does help with anxiety in introductory studies. An animal study analysis found that ginger relieves anxiety by affixing serotonin receptors. The researchers found nine components of ginger that partially bandage the brain's 5-HT(1A) receptor. In turn, this stimulated reduced symptoms of anxiety in the tested subjects.
AMVital Nutrition

Is Ginger Good for Colds? Here's the Proof- AMVital - 0 views

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    As the weather gets colder, we're all looking for ways to get through the winter months. One of the most popular natural remedies is ginger. It's been used for thousands of years and has been shown to relieve symptoms like sore throat and coughing as well as boost overall health. People often use ginger as a home remedy for treating colds and sore throats due to its antibacterial markers that can help handle pain and inflammation. The Ginger (Zingiber officinale) root is a perennial plant. Our forefathers have consumed ginger as a herbal therapy for decades after decades to cure many health conditions, from arthritis to abdominal pain. Today, we often use ginger when we have a cough or cold. The scientific database reveals that ginger has medicinal effects that could ease the symptoms of a cold or sore throat. This article will examine how ginger may help colds and how you can use it in teas, juices, and other home remedies. How is ginger good for treating Colds? There is no definitive proof that ginger can cure or eliminate colds from roots, but research indicates that it may help control them. Ginger can also aid in improving cold symptoms. One study review shows that there is evidence that ginger can help: prevent colds control or relieve a sore throat ease congestion decrease inflammation However, researchers need to examine ginger's additional benefits to support this evidence. Medicinal properties Ginger has blends called gingerols and shogaols. Experimenters consider that these compounds give ginger its therapeutic properties. It is a potent anti-inflammatory. It's also a natural expectorant and decongestant, which helps to clear up congestion. Ginger is high in vitamin C and manganese, both essential nutrients for boosting your immune system during the cold season. While ginger may not be a cure-all for the common cold or flu (it's always best to consult your doctor if you're sick), it can help keep you feeling better while you recover. Stu
AMVital Nutrition

What Are Ginger Shots? Everything You Need to Know - 0 views

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    If you want to start your day feeling refreshed and energized, consider creating a daily regimen of ginger shots instead! Ginger shots are like taking ginger ale straight to the source. They give you all sorts of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants your body needs to feel its best. These shots are beverages made from concentrated doses of ginger root (Zingiber officinale), which are asserted to aid in warding off sickness and strengthen your resilience against many health conditions. However, ginger shots just became prevalent recently in the wellness society; ginger brews have been used since ancient times to cure a host of ailments. While ginger presents unique health features, you may wonder whether sipping ginger shots is healthful. This article inspects ginger shots, including their potential health benefits, side effects, and preparation at home. Ginger Shots Ginger shots are potent drinks made with fresh ginger root. The ingredients used in the shot differ depending on the recipe you want to try. Some shots include only fresh ginger juice, while others comprise lemon juice, orange juice, turmeric, cayenne pepper, and/or manuka honey. You can make it at home by squeezing fresh ginger root juice or blending fresh, grated ginger with different juices, like lemon or orange. Now you can see that these shots are available pre-made or made to take away at juicers or health food stores. You can also beat them up at home by operating a juicer machine. For this, just add freshly grated ginger to citrus juice or mix a dash of ginger with other ingredients in a high-powered blending pot. You may find ginger shots spicy and unpleasant to drink owing to their high content of ginger roots. Hence, they're made in small amounts and generally drunk in one or two swigs. Ginger Root Ginger root has been used medicinally for thousands of years. The ancient Chinese used it to treat stomach problems, colds, and inflammation. According to the National Institute of Health (NIH
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Womb Cancer | Excess weight doubles risk : Researchers - 0 views

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    New research shows that lifelong excess weight almost doubles a woman's risk of developing womb cancer. The findings of the study were published in 'BMC Medicine'. The study from the University of Bristol is one of the first to find that for every fiver extra BMI units, a woman's risk of womb (endometrial) cancer is almost doubled (an increase of 88 per cent). This is higher than most previous studies have suggested and reflects lifelong weight status rather than a snapshot in time like most other studies. Five BMI units is the difference between the overweight category and the obese category, or of a 5'5 adult woman being two stones heavier. The international study looked at genetic samples from around 120,000 women from Australia, Belgium, Germany, Poland, Sweden, the UK, and the USA of which around 13,000 had womb cancer. This large statistical analysis is one of the first studies of its kind to look at the effect of lifelong greater BMI on womb cancer risk.
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6 MCAT Strategies That Will Help You Pass It Successfully - 0 views

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    Are you feeling overwhelmed about the MCAT? You're not alone! The MCAT is a challenging test that can feel daunting for even the best students. But don't worry, this article is here to help. This blog post will discuss six clever strategies that will help you pass the MCAT successfully. Follow these tips and you'll be on your way to achieving your dream score. ENROLL IN A PREP COURSE One of the first things you should do when preparing for the MCAT is to enroll in a prep course. Keep in mind that the right MCAT prep course will provide you with the resources and support you need to succeed. Additionally, it can help to take practice tests under simulated testing conditions. This will help you get used to the format of the test and reduce your anxiety on test day. In choosing a prep course, make sure to pick one that is reputable and has a good track record. You should also make sure that the course is affordable and offers a schedule that fits your needs. If possible, you can also take practice tests that are offered by the course. This way, you can get an idea of the type of questions that will be on the test. JOIN A STUDY GROUP Many people find that studying in a group is more effective than studying alone. When you join a study group, you'll have the opportunity to discuss difficult concepts with your peers. Additionally, you'll be able to hold each other accountable and stay on track with your studies. If you're not sure where to find a study group, ask your friends or classmates if they're interested in forming one. You can also check online forums or look for groups that have already been established.
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Unveiling the UKHSA and ONS Winter COVID-19 Study - 0 views

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    The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) and the Office for National Statistics (ONS) will jointly launch a new study to gather data on COVID-19 this winter. The Winter COVID-19 Infection Study (WCIS) will run from November 2023 to March 2024, involving up to 200,000 participants, UKHSA has said on Monday (October 2). UKHSA previously commissioned the Coronavirus Infection Survey (CIS), conducted by the ONS in collaboration with scientific study leaders from Oxford University, analysing more than 11.5 million swab tests and 3 million blood tests from April 2020 to March 2023. Meanwhile, the Winter CIS study involves conducting up to 32,000 lateral flow tests weekly, providing vital insights into COVID-19 prevalence in the broader community. The sample will be structured to broadly reflect key population characteristics.
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Gut bacteria may have a role in type 2 diabetes - 0 views

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    One type of bacteria found in the gut may contribute to the development of Type 2 diabetes, while another may protect from the disease, according to early results from an ongoing, prospective study led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai. The study, published in the peer-reviewed journal Diabetes, found people with higher levels of a bacterium called Coprococcus tended to have higher insulin sensitivity, while those whose microbiomes had higher levels of the bacterium Flavonifractor tended to have lower insulin sensitivity. Mark Goodarzi, the director of the Endocrine Genetics Laboratory at Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles, California, is leading an ongoing study that is following and observing people at risk for diabetes to learn whether those with lower levels of these bacteria develop the disease. "The big question we're hoping to address is: Did the microbiome differences cause diabetes, or did diabetes cause the microbiome differences?" said Goodarzi, who is the senior author of the study and principal investigator of the multicenter study called Microbiome and Insulin Longitudinal Evaluation Study (MILES).
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BP Management:Change medication beneficial as double dose - 0 views

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    A change in medication can benefit patients on blood pressure-lowering therapies significantly more than increasing the dose of their current medication. A recent study from Uppsala University that was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) demonstrates this. In this study, four different blood pressure-lowering medications were tested out on 280 individuals over the course of a year. "The effect of a change of medication can be twice as great as the effect of doubling the dose of the patient's current medication. It was clear in our study that certain patients achieved lower blood pressure from one drug than from another. This effect is large enough to be clinically relevant," said Johan Sundstrom, cardiologist and Professor of Epidemiology at Uppsala University, who is the first author of the study. Most Swedes develop high blood pressure sooner or later; more than two million Swedes have high blood pressure at the present time. Only a fifth of them have managed to bring their blood pressure under control through drug therapy, and some studies suggest that only half of them take their blood pressure medication as intended. Could this be because the efficacy and side-effects of the drugs differ from individual to individual?
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https://www.pharmacy.biz/npas-hef-funds-breakthrough-research-into-medicines-adherence/ - 0 views

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    The National Pharmacy Association (NPA)'s Health Education Foundation (HEF) has funded a major study that aimed to test the SPUR tool and evaluate how effective it was at measuring medicines adherence. The study has been published in the British Medical Journal Open. Dr Joshua Wells, a fourth year PhD candidate at Kingston University, who was awarded the NPA bursary, was the lead researcher for the SPUR UK study, under the guidance of Professor Reem Kayyali. Created by Observia, a health research group, SPUR is a self-assessment questionnaire which helps to detect a patient's risk of medicine non-adherence and aims to accurately articulate the reasons for health behaviour. As well as funding from HEF, the study was made possible via a partnership with Kingston University and Kingston Hospital. HEF chair of Trustees, Dr Ian Cubbin, said: "We are delighted that NPA's Health Education Foundation has played a part in such an important study. This research could lead ultimately to a far more personalised, tailored approach to medicines optimisation - recognising that people's medicines behaviour can be highly individual to them."
AMVital Nutrition

Does Ginger Help With Nausea? | AMVital - 0 views

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    Ginger is an age-old herb that has had extensive usage in history for its numerous natural therapeutic effects, especially as an "anti-emetic." The best-known proof indicates that ginger is an effective and affordable remedy for nauseatic and vomiting ailments and is safe. The pleasing zesty "kick" from the root of Zingiber officinale, the ginger plant, is what produces ginger ale, ginger tea, sweets, loaves of bread, and many Asian dishes so delicious. Ginger adds an aromatic tang to both sweet and spicy foods. As ginger is frequently suggested for its stomach-settling impacts, you may wonder whether it's a proven way to treat nauseatic ailments naturally. This article reevaluates the efficacy and safety of ginger for nausea and the most promising practices for using it. How does Ginger Help with Nausea? According to PubMed Central, the highly appreciated database from the National Institutes of Health, it's believed that ginger fetches its therapeutic qualities from gingerol, the main bioactive ingredient in fresh ginger, and complementary blends called shogaols, which provide the root its savory flavor. Shogaols are more robust in dried ginger, with 6-shogaol as the primary source of antioxidants. At the same time, gingerols are more plentiful in raw ginger. Some examination has revealed that ginger and its compounds may improve digestive function and speed up stomach emptying feel, relieving nausea. Its anti-inflammatory traits may improve digestive activity and sustain the discharge of blood-pressure-regulating hormones to relax your body and ease nausea. Other Health Benefits of Ginger Being an anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and digestive aid, it has been used as a natural treatment for helping to alleviate nausea and other symptoms. It can be used to treat: Heartburn Indigestion Motion sickness Reduce joint pain Soothe sore throats Minimize the duration of colds and flu viruses Ease menstrual cramps Prevent cancer cell growth Improve choleste
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New Study Reveals Boost in Pharmacy Tech Preparedness - 0 views

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    The implementation of the 2017 standards for the initial education and training of pharmacy technicians (IETPT) has improved the performance and preparedness for practice among recently registered pharmacy technicians and the wider workforce, according to a new study. Results of the 2023 research study commissioned by the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) showed that 72 per cent of pharmacy technicians felt "well prepared" for practice after training. More number of pharmacy technicians in the community pharmacy expressed readiness for practice (82 per cent) than their peers in the hospital pharmacy (64 peer cent). Led by the Centre for Pharmacy Workforce Studies (CPWS) at the University of Manchester and the consultancy service, ICF, the study involved 142 recently registered pharmacy technicians and 21 employers and supervisors of trainees. Overall, 96 per cent of the surveyed respondents believed that the course effectively covered person-centred care, professionalism and professional knowledge and skills.
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PANORAMIC Study: Pharmacy Teams Encouraged To Support - 0 views

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    Pharmacy teams are being encouraged to support the ground-breaking Platform Adaptive trial of Novel antivirals for early treatment of Covid-19 In the Community (PANORAMIC) study by raising awareness among patients. The study aims to find out whether new antiviral treatments can help Covid-19 patients avoid hospital admission and support a quicker recovery. The PANORAMIC trial will allow researchers to gather data on the potential benefits of treatments to patients and will help the NHS to develop plans for rolling out the products to further patients in 2022. Anyone over the age of 50 or between 18 to 49 with certain underlying health conditions can participate in the trial after receiving a positive PCR or lateral flow test result for Covid-19. People who wish to participate in the trial can sign up themselves through the study's website and may be contacted by a member of the clinical team in a general practice that has been set up to deliver the PANORAMIC trial.
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Vaping may increase your risk of developing heart failure - 0 views

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    In response to the concerning surge in youth vaping, the UK government in January announced its decision to ban disposable vapes as a measure to safeguard the health of children. Prime Minister Rishi Sunak stated that while the long-term impacts of vaping were uncertain, the nicotine present in these products can be highly addictive. Therefore, he emphasised that "marketing vapes to children is not acceptable." Now, there's a stronger reason to crack down on vape sales as a new study has revealed that vaping or the use of e-cigarettes may increase the risk of developing heart failure. The study, which involved 175,000 adults in the United States, found that those who use e-cigarettes were 19 per cent more likely to develop heart failure over a four-year period. Dr Yakubu Bene-Alhasan, lead author of the study, from MedStar Health in Baltimore, underscored that an increasing number of studies are linking e-cigarettes with harmful effects, suggesting vaping "might not be as safe as previously thought." With further research, Dr Bene-Alhasan's team plans to uncover "a lot more about the potential health consequences and improve the information out to the public."
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Erectile Dysfunction Meds Slash Alzheimer's Odds by 18% - 0 views

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    In a new study, men who took phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5Is), such as Viagra (sildenafil; Pfizer), for treatment of erectile dysfunction, were found to be 18 per cent less likely to develop Alzheimer's compared to those who did not take the drugs. The results of the population-based cohort study were published in Neurology on 7 February 2024. Researchers at University of Oxford examined IQVIA Medical Research Data UK records of 269,725 men, who were diagnosed with erectile dysfunction between January 2000 and March 2017. None of the participants had any memory or thinking problems at the start of the study and they were followed for an average of 5.1 years. During the study, 749 out of 1,119 participants taking erectile dysfunction drugs developed Alzheimer's disease.
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Vitamin D supplementation helps in healthy weight loss - 0 views

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    A diet supplemented with vitamin D can help support healthy weight loss and reduce fat percentage, a new clinical study revealed. A trial was conducted over a three-month period with 125 overweight and obese Southeastern European Caucasians with vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency. Participants were prescribed vitamin D3 3000 IU/d oral spray supplementation, or a placebo, alongside a calorie-restricted diet programme of 600 kcal less than the total energy expenditure of each individual. The report stated that the group who were prescribed vitamin D witnessed significant improvements in serum 25(OH)D level and a greater reduction in body weight, BMI, and fat percentage in all individuals within this group. The study supported by BetterYou found that with the prevalence of low vitamin D becoming a serious global health problem in all ages, even in areas with natural sun exposure throughout the year, the study shines a light on the importance of vitamin D supplementation.
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Good cholesterol level:Predictive value varies by race - 0 views

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    The widely-held concept that levels of "good" cholesterol in the blood can indicate heart disease risk is not equally true for Blacks and whites, and the measure itself may be of less value than previously thought, according to a U.S. study published on Monday (November 21). Various types of cholesterol are thought to have either healthy or unhealthy effects. Low levels of so-called "good" high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were linked with higher odds for developing cardiac problems in the long-term study - but only in white participants, the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found. In contradiction to what has generally been assumed, low HDL levels did not confer any higher risk of heart disease in Black people, researchers said. Among white people, however, those with HDL levels below 40 milligrams per deciliter had a 22% higher risk for coronary heart disease compared with those whose HDL levels were higher. High HDL levels (above 60 mg/dL), which are thought to be protective, were not linked with lower coronary heart disease risks in either race, researchers found.
AMVital Nutrition

Ginseng Plant Benefits You Cannot Afford to Ignore-AMVital - 0 views

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    Have you ever wondered about the health benefits of ginseng? It's been used for thousands of years by people in Asia and Eastern Europe, but did you know it's good for more than just boosting energy? The ginseng plant deals with 11 combinations of short, slowly growing plants with fleshy roots. It can revive and improve well-being. This article will explore how this herbal plant can benefit your body. 11 Health Benefits of the Ginseng Plant There are two types of ginseng plants mainly: Asian or Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng) American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius). Studies have discovered that the distinct types have various uses. American ginseng is believed to be less stimulating in traditional Chinese medicine than the Asian one. There are several other herbs known as ginseng, like eleuthero or Siberian ginseng, but they don't have the valuable content of ginsenosides. Ginseng has traditionally been used for several medical illnesses. However, its benefits for most of them have yet to be thoughtfully researched. These include: 1/11_It may help your lungs work better. ginseng plant lowers lungs infections.Ginseng may also help your lungs, according to a published study in the Journal of Ethnopharmacology. Researchers found that one of the active ingredients in ginseng, ginsenoside Rg1 has an anti-inflammatory effect on the lungs and can even protect against asthma and bronchitis. They found that rats with asthma had less inflammation after being given doses of ginseng for two weeks compared to rats not given any. They also observed that rats with pneumonia had fewer symptoms when they were treated with inhaled doses of ginsenoside Rg1 or orally administered doses of Korean red ginseng extract (KRGE). 2/11_It may lower blood sugar levels. ginseng plant lower blood sugar levels. It's not just your imagination-ginseng can help lower blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. It also has been proven to reduce the amount of cholesterol in your body. It
AMVital Nutrition

Turmeric Soap Bar: Amazing Benefits That Will Change Your Life! - 0 views

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    Although not factual, studies reveal that shortly turmeric will turn out to be a low-cost replacement to reduce all kinds of skin diseases like eczema, alopecia, etc. Soaping with a turmeric soap bar can help you improve your skin health in many ways. And what's more? It's easy to make a turmeric soap bar at home using kitchen ingredients you may already have in your cupboard! Here are 15 excellent benefits of turmeric soap that will change your life. 1) Turmeric Soap Bar Prevents Hyperpigmentation Ultra Violet rays cause sunburns, skin cancer, fine lines, hyperpigmentation, and wrinkles. A study published in the Journal of Clinical and aesthetic dermatology affirms that topical turmeric curcuminextract in a moisturizing cream and soap formula reduces the appearance of facial spots, fine lines, aging, and wrinkles on human facial skin. Also, it was found that hyperpigmentation can be reduced by 14-15% within four to five weeks ofturmeric-based skincare products. Being a natural ingredient, turmeric soap is safe for all skin types and is even recommended for people with skin conditions. Also, ongoing research found that turmeric's antioxidant contents improved sun damage in rat skin. 2) Turmeric Soap Bar Help Treat Acne The turmeric soap bar is made with a mixture of water, coconut oil, and a tablespoon of freshly grated turmeric root. Turmeric has antibacterial properties that help fight acne-causing bacteria. Acne bursts out due to the bacteria named Propionibacterium. It will help improve the look by reducing inflammation induced by acne. Fresh turmeric also works as an astringent to tighten pores due to acne. This soap bar is mild enough for all skin types, including those with sensitive skin or rosacea. Make this paste and apply it twice a day on acne. Combine wild turmeric powder with skin-healthy DIY face packs, such as honey, apple cider vinegar, yogurt, coconut oil, turmeric essential oil, or aloe. Moreover, a study suggests curcumin-supplemented l
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UK Pharmaceutical Industry Gains Trust Amid Pandemic: Study - 0 views

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    The UK pharmaceutical industry experienced a substantial increase in public trust and favourability during the Covid-19 pandemic, according to a new poll. This trend appears to be persisting with the study showing a generally favourable view of the sector. The recent survey, conducted by Ipsos and commissioned by Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry (ABPI), represents the third instalment in a series that began in 2021. This ongoing study targets members of the public, healthcare professionals, and parliamentarians. The study once again underscored a favourable perception of the sector with 67 per cent of respondents recognising that the pharmaceutical industry produces safe and effective medicines using cutting-edge technologies. Moreover, a majority agrees that it is a highly innovative field. Seven out of 10 people also trust the sector's readiness to address future pandemics, even as media attention on pharmaceutical companies returns to pre-pandemic levels. However, concerns arise regarding limitations in accessing new medicines due to cost pressures.
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Over 5000 People Enrolled For PANORAMIC Study For Antivirals - 0 views

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    More than 5,000 vulnerable people have enrolled for the ground-breaking Platform Adaptive trial of NOvel antiviRals for eArly treatMent of Covid-19 In the Community (PANORAMIC) study on life-saving antivirals. With this the UK is now one step closer to rolling out the innovative medicines, which would help reduce the severity of symptoms and the risk of hospitalisation or death. Success of the study would eventually help to ease pressures on the NHS. Anyone over the age of 50 or between 18 to 49 with certain underlying health conditions can participate in the trial after receiving a positive PCR or lateral flow test result.
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