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Derek Bruff

When it comes to internet privacy, be very afraid, analyst suggests | Harvard Gazette - 2 views

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    Here's a recent interview with security expert Bruce Schneier.
Derek Bruff

Edward Snowden (@Snowden) | Twitter - 0 views

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    Hey, check out Snowden's engaging Twitter feed.
masonagrow

Civil Liberties and Law in the Era of Surveillance--Stanford Law - 0 views

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    An article debating security/surveillance vs. privacy post-Snowden leaks, written fall 2014 for Stanford Lawyer Magazine
masonagrow

Balancing Act: National Security and Civil Liberties in Post-9/11 Era - 2 views

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    Discusses some of the points we brought up in class and provides statistics, but data is from 2013 and could potentially show the effects of events in the past two years when combined with Abbey's post
Derek Bruff

Don't Blame Snowden for Terror in Paris - Bloomberg View - 0 views

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    This piece captures some of the complexity of the surveillance / privacy debate as it applies to Snowden and the Paris attacks.
Abbey Roberts

Edward Snowden | US news | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Latest on the computer analyst whistleblower who provided the Guardian with top-secret NSA documents leading to revelations about US surveillance on phone and internet communications" - compilation of news sources on Edward Snowden
Abbey Roberts

Can you keep a secret? The Bletchley codebreakers 70 years on - Telegraph - 4 views

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    Interesting article describing the people who worked at Bletchley Park (UK) during WWII and the secrecy act that kept them silent. The article makes compelling comparisons to people today like Edward Snowden, who are legally bound to secrecy but ignore it. What are the ethical implications of being asked to keep military secrets? Of sharing military secrets? How do the differences between today's generation and the WWII generation affect how these ethics are viewed?
Derek Bruff

untitled - 0 views

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    Ladar Levison and William Binney each paid the price for a moral stand against the U.S. government. And your digital privacy is slightly better for it.
giordas

Online Privacy: Technical, Political, or Both? When it comes to encryption, there's sol... - 1 views

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    What really stood out to me about this article was that they said the NSA actually pays more attention to those people who use encryption. So, in order to protect ourselves and also avoid prying NSA eyes, we should encourage people to stand in solidarity with encryption. I thought this was really interesting because I always thought that encryption would undoubtedly make everything more secure, but here they're saying that it actually attracts attention (which isn't necessarily a good thing).
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    When I was a kid, I read an issue of Superman in which he faces Batman's villain, the Joker. At one point, the Joker tells Superman that he's kidnapped all of Superman's best friends (Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen, and so on) and locked them inside lead-lined caskets, hidden throughout Metropolis. Since the caskets are air-tight, they only have an hour to live, and Superman can't find them because his x-ray vision can't see through lead! That's what the Joker said. Actually, since Superman can't see through lead, those caskets *stood out* when he scanned the city with his x-ray vision, and he rescued all his friends in short order. Same basic idea.
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