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Paul Merrell

InternetNews Realtime IT News - Citrix CTO Eyes the Future of Virtualization - 0 views

  • The need for openness led major players in the virtualization market to jointly create a proposed standard, the Open Virtual Machine Format (OVF). Members of the team were XenSource, which is owned by Citrix, VMware, Microsoft, HP, IBM and Dell. The OVF was submitted to the Distributed Management Task Force (DMTF), which develops management standards and promotes interoperability for enterprise and Internet environments. The DMTF accepted the proposed standard in September. The OVF will package all VMs with an XML wrapper that will let them run on any virtualization platform. It will also incorporate a security check to ensure that the VM has not been tampered with; metadata about what hardware or hypervisor the VM can run on; and a license check. The DMTF said the OVF will be rolled out this year.
Paul Merrell

Ubuntu Goes Enterprise - CIO.com - Business Technology Leadership - 0 views

  • Canonical, Ubuntu's parent company, is finally taking serious action on its long-announced plans to become a serious enterprise Linux player. The Isle of Man-based Linux distributor isn't just targeting data center servers, although that's on its list.
  • The plan is for VARs (value added resellers) and system integrators to brand the complete package under their own names.
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    Ubuntu Enterprise to ship with Zimbra, Alfresco, and Unison in easy-to-install packages, plus IBM Notes-related collaboration software packages.
Gary Edwards

Does your OS matter in a cloud? | It's the Business Process - not the Application! | Ta... - 0 views

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    The question proposed is tha tof how OSS will be impacted by SaaS and Cloud Computing? My position, as stated in this reply, is that OSS will become even more important going forward. The comment includes WebKit, XAML, Client/Server, and the great transition to Client/ Web-Stack /server models.
Paul Merrell

Thomas R. Bruce on interoperability and legal information | Universal Interoperability ... - 0 views

  • Legal Information Institute ("LII") founder and director Thomas R. Bruce has begun an excellent series of blog articles on the vital role of intererability in the provision of free legal information to the world, "hacking eGovernment" as he puts it. For those who do not know of him, Mr. Bruce is a giant in the movement to make government information available to everyone. LII is headquartered at the Cornell University School of Law and has international branches. Mr. Bruce's series is one to watch for those pondering the future of hacking eGovernment.
  • Amid all the screeching in the last post, it’s a little hard to figure out what the point was. So I’ll just say it: folks, the future does not lie in putting up huge, centralized collections of caselaw . It lies in building services that can work across many individual collections put up by lots of different people in lots of different institutional settings. Let me say that again: the future does not lie in putting up huge, centralized collections of caselaw. It lies in building services that can work across many individual collections put up by lots of different people in lots of different institutional settings. Services like site-spanning searches, comprehensive current-awareness services, and a scad of interesting mashups in which we put caselaw, statutes and regulations alongside other stuff to make new stuff.
  • Read more.
Gary Edwards

Bill de hÓra: Plugin pros and cons - 0 views

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    excellent overview of plug-in architectures
Paul Merrell

Google Wins Patent For Data Center In A Box; Trouble For Sun, Rackable, IBM? -- Data Ce... - 0 views

  • Google (NSDQ: GOOG) has obtained a broad patent for a data center in a container, which might put a kink in product plans for companies like Sun Microsystems (NSDQ: JAVA), Rackable Systems, and IBM (NYSE: IBM). The patent, granted Tuesday, covers "modular data centers with modular components that can implemented in numerous ways, including as a process, an apparatus, a system, a device, or a method."
  • The U.S. Patent Trademark Office site reveals patent number 7,278,273 as describing modules in intermodal shipping containers, or those that can be shipped by multiple carriers and systems. It also covers computing systems mounted within temperature-controlled containers, configured so they can ship easily, be factory built and deployed at data center sites.
  • If this sounds familiar, it might just be. Google's patent description resembles Sun Microsystems' data center in a box, called Project Blackbox. During its debut last year, Sun installed a Blackbox -- essentially a cargo container for 18-wheelers -- outside of Grand Central Station in New York City to show how easily one of their data centers could be installed. Google's patent description also has similarities to Rackable Systems' ICE Cube as well as IBM's Scalable Modular Data Center.
Paul Merrell

Sun Modular Datacenter S20 - Overview - 0 views

  • Sun Modular Datacenter S20, widely known as Project Blackbox, is revolutionizing how companies, universities, and governments add datacenter capacity. With its high-density, eco-friendly design that enables rapid deployment, game-changing economics, and unimaginable mobility, Sun Modular Datacenter is reaching new customers world-wide who have been waiting for just this type of break-through solution.
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    I was wrong. This page is the hub for Sun Blackbox containerized data center. Check the link titles to press coverage on the Perspectives page and you begin to get an idea why IBM was so desperate to force a hardware deal with Sun and Microsoft. Sun and Microsoft are ripping out and replacing IBM's hardware business.
Paul Merrell

Japan's Underground Datacenter - System News - 0 views

  • 00 meters under the ground in Japan, Sun along with ten other IT firms are building a datacenter. The datacenter is located at such a low depth to take advantage of the cooler air as a means of bringing the 40% of energy usage, for cooling, down a few notches. The datacenter will also be reluctant to Japan’s earthquake potential by being built on the solid bedrock floor of the crater hollowed out for the project.
  • In the underground pictures it is clear that the Sun Modular Datacenter 20 is going to be a successful format for the datacenter because it is self contained and there is an abundant resource of ground water in the cave for a cooling system. The data center will be used by government agencies, it will serve as a service center for IT clients, and it will be used by businesses.
  • The Sun MD 20 Sun is included the design of this datacenter. In the earthquake analysis, the prototype was placed on a large shake table in California, and put through a simulation of the Northridge earthquake of 1993. The results were very conclusive. The location of Japan’s underground datacenter is still undisclosed. More Information
Paul Merrell

Sun's Advanced Datacenter (Santa Clara, CA) - System News - 0 views

  • To run Sun’s award-winning data centers, a modular design containing many "pods" was implemented to save power and time. The modular design aids the building of any sized datacenter. Inside of each pod, there are 24 racks. Each of these 24 racks has a common cooling system as does every other modular building block. The number of pods is limited by the size of the datacenters. Large and small datacenters can benefit from using the pod approach. The module design makes it easy to configure a datacenter to meet a client's requirements. As the datacenter grows over time, adding pods is convenient. The module and pod designs make it easy to adapt to new technology such as blade servers. Some of the ways that Sun’s datacenter modules are designed with the future in mind are as follows:
  • To run Sun’s award-winning data centers, a modular design containing many "pods" was implemented to save power and time. The modular design aids the building of any sized datacenter. Inside of each pod, there are 24 racks. Each of these 24 racks has a common cooling system as does every other modular building block. The number of pods is limited by the size of the datacenters. Large and small datacenters can benefit from using the pod approach. The module design makes it easy to configure a datacenter to meet a client's requirements. As the datacenter grows over time, adding pods is convenient. The module and pod designs make it easy to adapt to new technology such as blade servers.
  • An updated 58-page Sun BluePrint covers Sun's approach to designing datacenters. (Authors - Dean Nelson, Michael Ryan, Serena DeVito, Ramesh KV, Petr Vlasaty, Brett Rucker, and Brian Day): ENERGY EFFICIENT DATACENTERS: THE ROLE OF MODULARITY IN DATACENTER DESIGN. More Information Sun saves $1 million/year with new datacenter Take a Virtual Tour
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • An updated 58-page Sun BluePrint covers Sun's approach to designing datacenters. (Authors - Dean Nelson, Michael Ryan, Serena DeVito, Ramesh KV, Petr Vlasaty, Brett Rucker, and Brian Day): ENERGY EFFICIENT DATACENTERS: THE ROLE OF MODULARITY IN DATACENTER DESIGN.
  • Take a Virtual Tour
  • Other articles in the Hardware section of Volume 125, Issue 1: Sun's Advanced Datacenter (Santa Clara, CA) Modular Approach Is Key to Datacenter Design for Sun Sun Datacenter Switch 3x24 See all archived articles in the
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    This page seems to be the hub for information about the Sun containerized data centers. I've highlighted links as well as text, but not all the text on the page. Info gathered in the process of surfing the linked pages: [i] the 3x24 data switch page recomends redundant Solaris instances; [ii] x64 blade servers are the design target; [iii] there is specific mention of other Sun-managed data centers being erected in Indiana and in Bangalore, India; [iv] the whiff is that Sun might not only be supplying the data centers for the Microsoft cloud but also managing them; and [v] the visual tour is very impressive; clearly some very brilliant people put a lot of hard and creative work into this.
Gary Edwards

Is the W3C to Blame for the Breaking of the Web? | Continuing Intermittent In... - 0 views

  • Consider the recent CSS features added by WebKit: transformations, animations, gradients, masks, et cetera. They’ve very nearly _run out_ of standards to implement, so they’re starting to implement the wouldn’t-it-be-cool-if stuff. If I’m not mistaken, this is the exact sort of thing you’re wishing for.
  • Changing the renderer (which is what we’re taking about when we talk about upgrading “the web”) goes hand-in-hand today with upgrading the *rest* of the browser as well, which requires the user to care…and users (to a one) don’t give a flying leap about CSS 2.1 support.
    • Gary Edwards
       
      Note to marbux: the browser is the layout/rendering engine for web applications and services. Nothing happens on the web unless and until the browser, or a browser RiA alternative, implements a compliant end user interface. Focus on the browser layout engines, and Web applications will follow.
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    Another article taking up the issue of "Blame the W3C" for what increasingly looks like a proprietary Web future. The author is an Ajax-DOJO supporter, and he tries to defend the W3C by saying it's not their job, they don't have the "power" or the "authority" to push the Web forward. About the best they can do is, at the end of the day, try to corral big vendors into agreement. Meanwhile, the Web has become the wild wild west with browser vendors innovating into their corporate web stacks where vast profits and future monopolies rest. For me, WebKit represents the best effort insisting that the Web remain Open. It's OSS with excellent big vendor support. And they are pushing the envelope. Finally!
Gary Edwards

WebKit and the Future of the Open Web - 0 views

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    I reformatted my response to marbux concerning HTML5 and web application lack of interoperability. The original article these comments were posted to is titled, "Siding with HTML over XHTML, My Decision to Switch.... ".
Gary Edwards

A Proprietary Web? Blame the W3C | TechConsumer Paul Ellis - 0 views

  • The real culprit This may seem like a forgone conclusion to many of you after seeing the W3C’s development timetables, but the real reason Flash and Silverlight exist is because the “open-web” people dropped the ball. HTML simply can handle what Flash and Silverlight can do. It has become increasingly stale for modern web development needs. Here is some perspective, HTML5 has finally added a tag for handling video. Flash 6 came out in 2002 with video support! Where is the HTML version of Line Rider? It is in Flash and Silverlight now. If you want to see something really interesting check out Hard Rock Cafe’s memorabilia page (Silverlight 2 required) and tell me if you’ve ever seen something like that with HTML
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    A must read. This article was slashdotted.
Gary Edwards

Siding with HTML over XHTML, My Decision to Switch - Monday By Noon - 0 views

  • Publishing content on the Web is in no way limited to professional developers or designers, much of the reason the net is so active is because anyone can make a website. Sure, we (as knowledgeable professionals or hobbyists) all hope to make the Web a better place by doing our part in publishing documents with semantically rich, valid markup, but the reality is that those documents are rare. It’s important to keep in mind the true nature of the Internet; an open platform for information sharing.
  • XHTML2 has some very good ideas that I hope can become part of the web. However, it’s unrealistic to think that all web authors will switch to an XML-based syntax which demands that browsers stop processing the document on the first error. XML’s draconian policy was an attempt to clean up the web. This was done around 1996 when lots of invalid content entered the web. CSS took a different approach: instead of demanding that content isn’t processed, we defined rules for how to handle the undefined. It’s called “forward-compatible parsing” and means we can add new constructs without breaking the old. So, I don’t think XHTML is a realistic option for the masses. HTML 5 is it.
    • Gary Edwards
       
      Great quote from CSS expert Hakon Wium Lie.
  • @marbux: Of course i disagree with your interop assessment, but I wondered how it is that you’re missing the point. I think you confuse web applications with legacy desktop – client/server application model. And that confusion leads to the mistake of trying to transfer the desktop document model to one that could adequately service advancing web applications.
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    A CMS expert argues for HTML over XHTML, explaining his reasons for switching. Excellent read! He nails the basics. for similar reasons, we moved from ODF to ePUB and then to CDf and finally to the advanced WebKit document model, where wikiWORD will make it's stand.
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    See also my comment on the same web page that explains why HTML 5 is NOT it for document exchange between web editing applications. .
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    Response to marbux supporting the WebKit layout/document model. Marbux argues that HTML5 is not interoperable, and CSS2 near useless. HTML5 fails regarding the the interop web appplications need. I respond by arguing that the only way to look at web applications is to consider that the browser layout engine is the web application layout engine! Web applications are actually written to the browser layout/document model, OR, to take advantage of browser plug-in capabilities. The interoperability marbux seeks is tied directly to the browser layout engine. In this context, the web format is simply a reflection of that layout engine. If there's an interop problem, it comes from browser madness differentials. The good news is that there are all kinds of efforts to close the browser gap: including WHATWG - HTML5, CSS3, W3C DOM, JavaScript Libraries, Google GWT (Java to JavaScript), Yahoo GUI, and the my favorite; WebKit. The bad news is that the clock is ticking. Microsoft has pulled the trigger and the great migration of MSOffice client/server systems to the MS WebSTack-Mesh architecture has begun. Key to this transition are the WPF-.NET proprietary formats, protocols and interfaces such as XAML, Silverlight, LINQ, and Smart Tags. New business processes are being written, and old legacy desktop bound processes are being transitioned to this emerging platform. The fight for the Open Web is on, with Microsoft threatening to transtion their entire business desktop monopoly to a Web platfomr they own. ~ge~
Gary Edwards

Time to Pounce: Stephane Rodriguez Responds | Is Microsoft slow to the punch on SOA, or... - 0 views

  • Time to pounce Noted document expert Stephane Rodriquez has two blog posts (1 and 2) well worth reading. He also supports the opinion that Microsoft has won. They've done the impossible. And every Microsoft executive should be facing criminal charges.
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    Links to two posts from Stephane Rodriquez.
Gary Edwards

The Time to Pounce Has Come : Is Microsoft slow to the punch on SOA, or just waiting fo... - 0 views

  • The Time to Pounce Has Come I agree with DonnieBoy. Microsoft will try to leverage their MSOffice monopoly to dominate the newly emerging marketplace of Web-Stack and Cloud Computing solutions. I also believe that for Microsoft, the final pieces of this puzzle fell into place on March 29th, 2008 with ISO approval of the MSOffice-OOXML document format. For most businesses, Microsoft is the "client" in "client/server". The great transition from client/server to client/ Web-Stack /server has been slow because Microsoft was uncertain as to how they could control this transition. Some light was shed on the nature of this "uncertainty" when the Combs vs. Microsoft antitrust case brought forth a 1998 eMail from Chairman Bill to the MSOffice development team. The issue for the good Chairman was that of controlling the formats and protocols used to connect MSOffice to a Web centric world. MSOffice support for Open Web formats and protocols like (X)HTML, CSS, and WebDAV were out of the question. Microsoft needed to figure out how pull off this transition with proprietary formats and protocols. And avoid the wrath of antitrust in the process!
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    ge response to Joe McKendrick's SOA article.
Paul Merrell

Office Business Applications (OBA) - 0 views

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    Homepage for the MSDN Architecture Center Office Business Applications white papers.
Paul Merrell

Office Business Applications: Building Composite Applications Using the Microsoft Platform - 0 views

  • Summary: This book is about composite applications and how they can be developed as OBAs using the 2007 Microsoft Office System. It provides an overview of the technologies available in the 2007 Microsoft Office System, and gives several examples from various industries to build OBAs using composition at the presentation, business-logic, and data layers. This book is meant for solution architects, industry architects, or senior developers who are designing, developing, and deploying composite applications. (97 total printed pages)
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