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Paul Merrell

HTML5: Getting to Last Call - W3C Blog - 1 views

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    Get your HTML 5 bug reports filed *before* October 1.  See http://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/public-html/2010Sep/0074.html for more details.
Paul Merrell

Dr. Dobb's | The Arrival of HTML 5 | August 13, 2010 - 1 views

  • HTML (short for the "Hyper Text Markup Language") is one of the underpinnings technologies of the modern web with the lion's share of web users' Internet activities founded on it. For nearly two decades HTML has worked well while undergoning a number of changes in response to the growing requirements of web users and vendors. It now stands on the brink of the next change -- the coming of HTML 5. At present, the Internet already contains a handful of HTML 5 specification outlines which partially cover HTML 5 features and conceptions. In this article, we review the current state of HTML and describe the most significant HTML 5 innovations.
Paul Merrell

Google pounds the open standards drum during I/O keynote - 0 views

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    Separately, Microsoft and Apple have announced that both company's browsers will boycott VP8 in favor of H264, which is encumbered by more than a thousand patents.. But if VP8 becomes ubiquitous on the Web, that's a hard position to maintain.  
anonymous

YouTube HTML5 Video Player - 2 views

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    Finally YouTube offers you the option of doing without Adobe Flash.
Paul Merrell

Archive of W3C News in 2009 - 0 views

  • 2009-08-26: The HTML Working Group has published Working Drafts of HTML 5 and HTML 5 differences from HTML 4. In HTML 5, new features are introduced to help Web application authors, new elements are introduced based on research into prevailing authoring practices, and special attention has been given to defining clear conformance criteria for user agents in an effort to improve interoperability. "HTML 5 differences from HTML 4" describes the differences between HTML 4 and HTML 5 and provides some of the rationale for the changes. Learn more about HTML. (Permalink)
Gary Edwards

Official Google Webmaster Central Blog: Introducing Rich Snippets - 0 views

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    Google "Rich Snippets" is a new presentation of HTML snippets that applies Google's algorithms to highlight structured data embedded in web pages. Rich Snippets give end-users convenient summary information about their search results at a glance. Google is currently supporting a very limited subset of data about reviews and people. When searching for a product or service, users can easily see reviews and ratings, and when searching for a person, they'll get help distinguishing between people with the same name. It's a simple change to the display of search results, yet our experiments have shown that users find the new data valuable. For this to work though, both Web-masters and Web-workers have to annotate thier pages with structured data in a standard format. Google snippets supports microformats and RDFa. Existing Web data can be wrapped with some additional tags to accomplish this. Notice that Google avoids mention of RDF and the W3C's vision of a "Semantic Web" where Web objects are fully described in machine readable semantics. Over at the WHATWG group, where work on HTML5 continues, Google's Ian Hickson has been fighting RDFa and the Semantic Web in what looks to be an effort to protect the infamous Google algorithms. RDFa provides a means for Web-workers, knowledge-workers, line-of-business managers and document generating end-users to enrich their HTML+ with machine semantics. The idea being that the document experts creating Web content can best describe to search engine and content management machines the objects-of-information used. The google algorithms provide a proprietary semantics of this same content. The best solution to the tsunami of conten the Web has wrought would be to combine end-user semantic expertise with Google algorithms. Let's hope Google stays the RDFa course and comes around to recognize the full potential of organizing the world's information with the input of content providers. One thing the world desperatel
Gary Edwards

More WebKit Goodies - CSS Transforms and Transitions - the OSX Dock example | theChrisW... - 0 views

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    Chris Walker provides some interactive demonstrations of the powerful webkit-transforms that are placed in CSS. So, what can we do with all this magic? Well, the culmination of the Chris Walker demo is a Mac OSX style Dock menu, using no Javascript...

    ".....Yes, that's right a bulging docked menu, with no javascript. Just so you remember, there no javascript in the demo. Check out the Javascript free OSX Dock Menu Demo.

    This demo actually proves an important point Tom Yager made earlier about Ajax; Will JavaScript inconsistencies break the Web?

    Taking AJAX literally makes lousy Web apps: "As little as possible should be the rule for JavaScript, which must play a supporting role to CSS and HTML". Tom concludes that it's best to follow the WebKit model, putting everything possible into first CSS4, then HTML5, and then JavaScript. I would argue that the proliferation of JavaScript libraries is a good hedge against the non interoperable future Yager warns of. But hey, why stop the guy when he's on a roll. CSS4! I guess the webkit-transforms have been officially christened. Thanks Tom.

    ~ge~
Gary Edwards

The WHATWG Blog » Blog Archive » The Road to HTML 5: character encoding - 0 views

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    To sum up: character encoding is complicated, and it has not been made any easier by several decades of poorly written software used by copy-and-paste-educated authors. You should always specify a character encoding on every HTML document, or bad things will happen. You can do it the hard way (HTTP Content-Type header), the easy way ( declaration), or the new way ( attribute), but please do it. The web thanks you. Good post, lots of links to other "MUST READ" commentaries and explanations of character encoding. Including Joel Spolsky and Tim Bray.
Gary Edwards

Adamac Attack!: Evolution Revolution - 0 views

  • HTTP as a universal calling convention is pretty interesting. We already have tons of web services in the cloud using HTTP to communicate with one another - why not extend this to include local code talking with other components. The iPhone already supports a form of this IPC using the URL handlers, basically turning your application into a web server. BugLabs exposes interfaces to its various embedded device modules through web services. It has even been suggested in the literature that every object could embed a web server. Why not use this mechanism for calling that object's methods?
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    Given the increasing number of platforms supporting Javascript + HTTP + HTML5, it's not inconceivable that "write-once, run anywhere" might come closer to fruition with this combo than Java ever achieved. Here's how this architecture plays out in my mind. Javascript is the core programming language. Using a HTTP transport and JSON data format, components in different processes can perform RPCs to one another. HTML5 features like local storage and the application cache allow for an offline story (the latest build of Safari on iPhone supports this). And of course, HTML + CSS allows for a common UI platform.
Paul Merrell

[ANN] Markup Validator 0.8.4 released from Olivier Thereaux on 2008-11-20 (www-validato... - 0 views

  • I am thrilled to announce today the release of a new version of the W3C Markup Validation Service, also known as "HTML Validator". Use it online http://validator.w3.org/ .... or download it: it is Free and Open Source http://validator.w3.org/source/ The new version, 0.8.4 may sound like a very minor step from the version 0.8.3 released in August, but this new release of the W3C Markup Validator brings some very important change: in addition to checking documents against etablished standards such as HTML 4.01 and XHTML 1.0, the validator can now check documents for conformance to HTML5, thanks to the integration with the Validator.nu html5 engine.
  • HTML5 is still work in progress and support for this next generation of the publishing language of the World Wide Web will remain experimental. The integration of the html5 engine in the validator should provide experimentation grounds for those interested in trying on authoring in this new version of HTML, as well as a feedback channel for the group working on building a stable, open standard.
Paul Merrell

Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group Demos from September 2008 - 0 views

  • HTML 5 demos from September 2008
  • The demos and segments of this talk are: <video> (00:35) postMessage() (05:40) localStorage (15:20) sessionStorage (21:00) Drag and Drop API (29:05) onhashchange (37:30) Form Controls (40:50) <canvas> (56:55) Validation (1:07:20) Questions and Answers (1:09:35)
Gary Edwards

How HTML 5 Is Already Changing the Web - Webmonkey - 0 views

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    HTML 5 represents the biggest leap forward in web standards in almost a decade. Unlike the specifications that came before it, HTML 5 is not merely intended to present content to a web browser. Its goal is to bring the web into maturity as a full-fledged application platform - a level playing field where video, sound, images, animations, and full interactivity with your computer are all standardized. And it may be a long way off still, but elements of HTML 5 are already reshaping the way we use the web.
Gary Edwards

The Next-Gen Web: HTML5 - Will We Ever See A Real Standard? - 0 views

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    "...some browsers and plug-ins were adopting storage-related API's that are a part of the new HTML5 draft specification. While Gears, Opera and Webkit have implemented structured storage API's, the remainder of the HTML5 spec currently remains mostly unimplemented and also in a state of flux. HTML5 is a super-sized effort to bring all the browsers under a single, standard markup language and set of API's - but with Microsoft, Adobe and others racing ahead with their own next-gen web technologies, will we ever see a real HTML5 standard?" This article was posted in August of 2008, before the surprise release of the WebKit based "Google Chrome" .... the WebKit RiA alternative to Adobe AiR and Microsoft Silverlight
Gary Edwards

Mozilla Standards Blog » Blog Archive » Fear and Loathing on the Standards Tr... - 0 views

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    everything we do here at Mozilla is, for the most part, a contribution to the Web platform. I blogged previously about the low esteem I reserve for arguments that favor proprietary platforms (which typically pit rapid proprietary innovation against dawdling Web Platform standardization cycles), but even in that upbeat blog post, I acknowledge that the standards process leaves much room for improvement.
Paul Merrell

Offline Web Applications - 0 views

  • Abstract HTML 5 contains several features that address the challenge of building Web applications that work while offline. This document highlights these features (SQL, offline application caching APIs as well as online/offline events, status, and the localStorage API) from HTML 5 and provides brief tutorials on how these features might be used to create Web applications that work offline.
Gary Edwards

WebKit and the Future of the Open Web - 0 views

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    I reformatted my response to marbux concerning HTML5 and web application lack of interoperability. The original article these comments were posted to is titled, "Siding with HTML over XHTML, My Decision to Switch.... ".
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