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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

El futuro periodista tiene que ser la combinación de un hacker y un DJ - Clas... - 0 views

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    "¿Cómo tiene que ser el periodista hoy? Para Víctor Sampedro, catedrático de Opinión Pública y autor del libro "El cuarto poder en red", el periodista tiene que tener algo de hacker. Público.es realizó una interesante entrevista y compartimos algunos fragmentos."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Is Biometrics Technology Safe? - 0 views

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    "Biometrics is a step forward, but it increases risks. What happens when the digital code for a fingerprint, iris scan, voice print or facial geometry is hacked?"
Paul Merrell

What to Do About Lawless Government Hacking and the Weakening of Digital Security | Ele... - 0 views

  • In our society, the rule of law sets limits on what government can and cannot do, no matter how important its goals. To give a simple example, even when chasing a fleeing murder suspect, the police have a duty not to endanger bystanders. The government should pay the same care to our safety in pursuing threats online, but right now we don’t have clear, enforceable rules for government activities like hacking and "digital sabotage." And this is no abstract question—these actions increasingly endanger everyone’s security
  • The problem became especially clear this year during the San Bernardino case, involving the FBI’s demand that Apple rewrite its iOS operating system to defeat security features on a locked iPhone. Ultimately the FBI exploited an existing vulnerability in iOS and accessed the contents of the phone with the help of an "outside party." Then, with no public process or discussion of the tradeoffs involved, the government refused to tell Apple about the flaw. Despite the obvious fact that the security of the computers and networks we all use is both collective and interwoven—other iPhones used by millions of innocent people presumably have the same vulnerability—the government chose to withhold information Apple could have used to improve the security of its phones. Other examples include intelligence activities like Stuxnet and Bullrun, and law enforcement investigations like the FBI’s mass use of malware against Tor users engaged in criminal behavior. These activities are often disproportionate to stopping legitimate threats, resulting in unpatched software for millions of innocent users, overbroad surveillance, and other collateral effects.  That’s why we’re working on a positive agenda to confront governmental threats to digital security. Put more directly, we’re calling on lawyers, advocates, technologists, and the public to demand a public discussion of whether, when, and how governments can be empowered to break into our computers, phones, and other devices; sabotage and subvert basic security protocols; and stockpile and exploit software flaws and vulnerabilities.  
  • Smart people in academia and elsewhere have been thinking and writing about these issues for years. But it’s time to take the next step and make clear, public rules that carry the force of law to ensure that the government weighs the tradeoffs and reaches the right decisions. This long post outlines some of the things that can be done. It frames the issue, then describes some of the key areas where EFF is already pursuing this agenda—in particular formalizing the rules for disclosing vulnerabilities and setting out narrow limits for the use of government malware. Finally it lays out where we think the debate should go from here.   
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    "In our society, the rule of law sets limits on what government can and cannot do, no matter how important its goals. "
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    It's not often that I disagree with EFF's positions, but on this one I do. The government should be prohibited from exploiting computer vulnerabilities and should be required to immediately report all vulnerabilities discovered to the relevant developers of hardware or software. It's been one long slippery slope since the Supreme Court first approved wiretapping in Olmstead v. United States, 277 US 438 (1928), https://goo.gl/NJevsr (.) Left undecided to this day is whether we have a right to whisper privately, a right that is undeniable. All communications intercept cases since Olmstead fly directly in the face of that right.
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

U.S. Congress must act on government hacking, reject Rule 41 - Access Now - 0 views

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    "Washington D.C. - Access Now today calls upon the U.S. Congress to reject a new rule that will expand the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) hacking operations. The call comes as the Supreme Court of the United States reported a change in the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, specifically Rule 41, to Congress. The change enables the FBI to hack into computers regardless of where they are located, and to hack into the computers belonging to the victims of botnet operations. Access Now strongly opposes the update to Rule 41."
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    "Washington D.C. - Access Now today calls upon the U.S. Congress to reject a new rule that will expand the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) hacking operations. The call comes as the Supreme Court of the United States reported a change in the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, specifically Rule 41, to Congress. The change enables the FBI to hack into computers regardless of where they are located, and to hack into the computers belonging to the victims of botnet operations. Access Now strongly opposes the update to Rule 41."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Dynamic Malware Analysis Tools - Hacking Tutorials - 0 views

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    "In this tutorial we will be covering dynamic malware analysis tools which are being used to determine the behaviour of malware after it has been executed. This tutorial is part 2 of 6 in our Malware Analysis tutorials on www.hackingtutorials.org. If you haven't read part 1 of this series please read it first before continuing on this malware analysis tutorial."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

The Top Ten Hacker Tools of 2015 - 2 views

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    "List of top ten hacker tools of 2015 Every task requires a good set of tools.This because having right tools in hand one can save much of its energy and time.In the world of Cyber Hacking ("Cyber Security" formally) there are millions of tools which are available on the Internet either as Freewares or as Sharewares."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Exposed: NSA program for hacking any cell phone network, no matter where it is | Ars Te... - 1 views

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    "The National Security Agency has spied on hundreds of companies and groups around the world, including in countries allied with the US government, as part of an effort designed to allow agents to hack into any cellular network, no matter where it's located, according to a report published Thursday."
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    "The National Security Agency has spied on hundreds of companies and groups around the world, including in countries allied with the US government, as part of an effort designed to allow agents to hack into any cellular network, no matter where it's located, according to a report published Thursday."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

How citizens can participate in their local government | opensource.com - 0 views

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    "Civic hacking is people working together quickly and creatively to help improve government.-Jake Levitas"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Village:LaQuadratureduOhm - OHM2013 - 0 views

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    [from the 31st of July to the 4th of August!] "A village for all friends of La Quadrature du Net, all freedom fighters, datalovers & technology philosophers!
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