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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Despite Administration's Promises, Most Government Transparency Still The Work Of Whist... - 0 views

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    "from the the-government-can-doxx-you,-but-not-itself dept Meet the new transparency/Same as the old transparency: The Justice Department has kept classified at least 74 opinions, memos and letters on national security issues, including interrogation, detention and surveillance, according to a report released Tuesday by the Brennan Center for Justice."
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    "from the the-government-can-doxx-you,-but-not-itself dept Meet the new transparency/Same as the old transparency: The Justice Department has kept classified at least 74 opinions, memos and letters on national security issues, including interrogation, detention and surveillance, according to a report released Tuesday by the Brennan Center for Justice."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

French Government Wants A 'Global Initiative' To Undermine Encryption And Put Everyone ... - 1 views

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    "from the this-is-a-bad,-bad-idea dept Some bad ideas never seem to die. It appears that the French government is working to enlist other countries to try to undermine encryption and put us all at much greater risk. "
Paul Merrell

What to Do About Lawless Government Hacking and the Weakening of Digital Security | Ele... - 0 views

  • In our society, the rule of law sets limits on what government can and cannot do, no matter how important its goals. To give a simple example, even when chasing a fleeing murder suspect, the police have a duty not to endanger bystanders. The government should pay the same care to our safety in pursuing threats online, but right now we don’t have clear, enforceable rules for government activities like hacking and "digital sabotage." And this is no abstract question—these actions increasingly endanger everyone’s security
  • The problem became especially clear this year during the San Bernardino case, involving the FBI’s demand that Apple rewrite its iOS operating system to defeat security features on a locked iPhone. Ultimately the FBI exploited an existing vulnerability in iOS and accessed the contents of the phone with the help of an "outside party." Then, with no public process or discussion of the tradeoffs involved, the government refused to tell Apple about the flaw. Despite the obvious fact that the security of the computers and networks we all use is both collective and interwoven—other iPhones used by millions of innocent people presumably have the same vulnerability—the government chose to withhold information Apple could have used to improve the security of its phones. Other examples include intelligence activities like Stuxnet and Bullrun, and law enforcement investigations like the FBI’s mass use of malware against Tor users engaged in criminal behavior. These activities are often disproportionate to stopping legitimate threats, resulting in unpatched software for millions of innocent users, overbroad surveillance, and other collateral effects.  That’s why we’re working on a positive agenda to confront governmental threats to digital security. Put more directly, we’re calling on lawyers, advocates, technologists, and the public to demand a public discussion of whether, when, and how governments can be empowered to break into our computers, phones, and other devices; sabotage and subvert basic security protocols; and stockpile and exploit software flaws and vulnerabilities.  
  • Smart people in academia and elsewhere have been thinking and writing about these issues for years. But it’s time to take the next step and make clear, public rules that carry the force of law to ensure that the government weighs the tradeoffs and reaches the right decisions. This long post outlines some of the things that can be done. It frames the issue, then describes some of the key areas where EFF is already pursuing this agenda—in particular formalizing the rules for disclosing vulnerabilities and setting out narrow limits for the use of government malware. Finally it lays out where we think the debate should go from here.   
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    "In our society, the rule of law sets limits on what government can and cannot do, no matter how important its goals. "
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    It's not often that I disagree with EFF's positions, but on this one I do. The government should be prohibited from exploiting computer vulnerabilities and should be required to immediately report all vulnerabilities discovered to the relevant developers of hardware or software. It's been one long slippery slope since the Supreme Court first approved wiretapping in Olmstead v. United States, 277 US 438 (1928), https://goo.gl/NJevsr (.) Left undecided to this day is whether we have a right to whisper privately, a right that is undeniable. All communications intercept cases since Olmstead fly directly in the face of that right.
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

For $800 you can buy internet engineers' answer to US government spying * The Register - 0 views

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    Open-source CrypTech board launches in Berlin 18 Jul 2016 at 22:15, Kieren McCarthy The long-awaited response from internet engineers to Edward Snowden's revelations of mass surveillance by the US government has been launched in Berlin."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Tech giants, government struggle with online speech policies | ITworld - 0 views

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    " Officials with Google and State Department are struggling to craft a balanced policy that combats terrorist messages without unduly curbing Internet freedom. By Kenneth Corbin"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Appeals Court Tells Government It Must Extend Educational Institution FOIA Fee Price Br... - 0 views

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    "The perennial FOIA Reform Masquerade Ball is again under way, with legislators attempting to dodge blustery requests to "cut in" by administration officials and similarly-motivated federal agencies. The dance usually ends with Congressional committee chairmen yanking needles from records and booting everyone out of the dancehall. Meanwhile, limited headway is being made in another branch of the government, far from the muffled protests of overwhelming majorities who have been shouted down by parties of one. The DC Appeals Court has just ruled that the government must extend its FOIA fee discounts to students at educational institutions, rather than just to instructors and administration. "
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    "The perennial FOIA Reform Masquerade Ball is again under way, with legislators attempting to dodge blustery requests to "cut in" by administration officials and similarly-motivated federal agencies. The dance usually ends with Congressional committee chairmen yanking needles from records and booting everyone out of the dancehall. Meanwhile, limited headway is being made in another branch of the government, far from the muffled protests of overwhelming majorities who have been shouted down by parties of one. The DC Appeals Court has just ruled that the government must extend its FOIA fee discounts to students at educational institutions, rather than just to instructors and administration. "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

No one should have to use proprietary software to communicate with their government - F... - 0 views

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    "by Donald Robertson - Published on May 04, 2016 12:36 PM The Free Software Foundation (FSF) submitted a comment to the U.S. Copyright Office calling for a method to submit comments that do not require the use of proprietary JavaScript. Proprietary JavaScript is a threat to all users on the Web. When minified, the code can hide all sorts of nasty items, like spyware and other security risks. Savvy users can protect themselves by blocking scripts in their browser, or by installing the LibreJS browser extension and avoiding sites that require proprietary JavaScript in order to function. B"
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    "by Donald Robertson - Published on May 04, 2016 12:36 PM The Free Software Foundation (FSF) submitted a comment to the U.S. Copyright Office calling for a method to submit comments that do not require the use of proprietary JavaScript. Proprietary JavaScript is a threat to all users on the Web. When minified, the code can hide all sorts of nasty items, like spyware and other security risks. Savvy users can protect themselves by blocking scripts in their browser, or by installing the LibreJS browser extension and avoiding sites that require proprietary JavaScript in order to function. B"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

U.S. Congress must act on government hacking, reject Rule 41 - Access Now - 0 views

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    "Washington D.C. - Access Now today calls upon the U.S. Congress to reject a new rule that will expand the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) hacking operations. The call comes as the Supreme Court of the United States reported a change in the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, specifically Rule 41, to Congress. The change enables the FBI to hack into computers regardless of where they are located, and to hack into the computers belonging to the victims of botnet operations. Access Now strongly opposes the update to Rule 41."
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    "Washington D.C. - Access Now today calls upon the U.S. Congress to reject a new rule that will expand the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) hacking operations. The call comes as the Supreme Court of the United States reported a change in the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure, specifically Rule 41, to Congress. The change enables the FBI to hack into computers regardless of where they are located, and to hack into the computers belonging to the victims of botnet operations. Access Now strongly opposes the update to Rule 41."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

French government rejects crypto backdoors as "the wrong solution" | Ars Technica UK - 0 views

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    "Why can't we have cabinet ministers as clued-up as Axelle Lemaire? by Glyn Moody - Jan 14, 2016 3:22pm CET"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Top open source in government stories for 2015 | Opensource.com - 0 views

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    "Each year, I reflect on Opensource.com's top government stories of the year. I look for trends among our most popular stories. Stories about new tools and applications generally top the list, as well as, case studies detailing how governments are implementing those tools."
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    "Each year, I reflect on Opensource.com's top government stories of the year. I look for trends among our most popular stories. Stories about new tools and applications generally top the list, as well as, case studies detailing how governments are implementing those tools."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Pirate Party Beats Iceland's Government Coalition in the Polls - TorrentFreak - 0 views

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    " Ernesto on October 23, 2015 C: 23 Breaking The Pirate Party in Iceland continues to gain support, causing a revolution in the local political arena. According to the latest poll the party now has over a third of all votes in the country, beating the current Government coalition."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

US government won't seek encryption-backdoor legislation | Ars Technica UK [# ! Note] - 0 views

    • Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.
       
      # ! Presidential Elections 2016 coming...
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    "FBI Director James Comey told a congressional panel that the Obama administration won't ask Congress for legislation requiring the tech sector to install backdoors into their products so the authorities can access encrypted data."
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    "FBI Director James Comey told a congressional panel that the Obama administration won't ask Congress for legislation requiring the tech sector to install backdoors into their products so the authorities can access encrypted data."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Spanish Government Claims Success in Internet Piracy Fight - TorrentFreak - 0 views

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    " Andy on July 28, 2015 C: 25 News The Spanish government says it's making headway in its battle against online piracy. In a report issued by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sports, the government claims that illegal downloads are down, with 247 sites responding positively to copyright complaints and 31 shutting down completely."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

US government's reported number of wiretaps don't add up | Ars Technica - 0 views

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    "The government published its latest Wiretap Report on July 1. The headline finding was that encryption wasn't foiling federal and state law enforcement officials, despite a growing chorus of people suggesting that we're all gonna die unless the tech sector builds backdoor access into their products to enable government access."
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    "The government published its latest Wiretap Report on July 1. The headline finding was that encryption wasn't foiling federal and state law enforcement officials, despite a growing chorus of people suggesting that we're all gonna die unless the tech sector builds backdoor access into their products to enable government access."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Tech sector tells Obama encryption backdoors "undermine human rights" | Ars Technica - 1 views

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    "Backdoors "could be exploited by even the most repressive or dangerous regimes." by David Kravets - May 19, 2015 4:48 pm UTC"
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    "Backdoors "could be exploited by even the most repressive or dangerous regimes." by David Kravets - May 19, 2015 4:48 pm UTC"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Movie Studios Give 'Pirate' Sites a 24h Shutdown Ultimatum | TorrentFreak - 1 views

    • Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.
       
      # The Loser: The Culture (supposedly 'defended')... # ! :/
    • Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.
       
      # ! Perfect 'Double Income' for minimum work.
    • Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.
       
      # ! 2nd) from the generous governments' subsidies due to 'Industry'continious complaints...
    • Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.
       
      # ! How it is possible that we take 17 (since DMCA) with this…? # ! Bet that everybody in the entertainment -and else- industry are taking profit... # 1st) From the additional promotion that 'free riding supposes, and
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    [ By Ernesto on April 30, 2015 C: 0 Breaking On behalf of the major Hollywood movie studios the Motion Picture Association (MPA) is demanding that pirate site operators shut down within 24 hours, or else. The recent push targets a wide variety of services, including some of the top torrent sites. Thus far, the only casualty appears to be a rather small linking site.]
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

When AT&T promises broadband-but delivers only 300Kbps | Ars Technica - 0 views

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    "For new homeowners, accurate information from Internet providers is hard to find. by Jon Brodkin - Apr 28, 2015 1:00 pm UTC"
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    "For new homeowners, accurate information from Internet providers is hard to find. by Jon Brodkin - Apr 28, 2015 1:00 pm UTC"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Google and Facebook Say Weak Encryption Makes Law Enforcement Less Accountable | MIT Te... - 0 views

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    "Privacy bosses at Google and Facebook say letting the U.S. government unlock encrypted customer data would make law enforcement less accountable. "
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    "Privacy bosses at Google and Facebook say letting the U.S. government unlock encrypted customer data would make law enforcement less accountable. "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Leaked Secret TPP Doc Reveals Sovereignty-destroying Courts - OSNet Daily [# ! Note...] - 0 views

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    "The New American Why has the Obama administration kept the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement text secret from Congress and the American people? A newly leaked TPP chapter reveals at least one huge reason: The TPP text proposes creating tribunals (courts) that could overrule the decisions of our state and federal courts, as well as our local, state and federal laws - and our state and national constitutions."
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    "The New American Why has the Obama administration kept the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement text secret from Congress and the American people? A newly leaked TPP chapter reveals at least one huge reason: The TPP text proposes creating tribunals (courts) that could overrule the decisions of our state and federal courts, as well as our local, state and federal laws - and our state and national constitutions."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

French Government Starts Blocking Websites With Views The Gov't Doesn't Like - 0 views

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    "from the liberte?-egalite? dept We had been noting, in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo attacks in France, how the country that then held a giant "free speech" rally appeared to be, instead, focusing on cracking down on free speech at every opportunity. And target number one: the internet."
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    "from the liberte?-egalite? dept We had been noting, in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo attacks in France, how the country that then held a giant "free speech" rally appeared to be, instead, focusing on cracking down on free speech at every opportunity. And target number one: the internet."
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