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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Diceware Passphrase Home - 0 views

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    "This page offers a better way to create a strong, yet easy to remember passphrase for use with encryption and security programs."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Harvard study refutes 'going dark' argument against encryption | ITworld - 0 views

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    "Unencrypted data, which will be accessible to law enforcement, will continue to dominate the Internet By Jeremy Kirk "
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

French government rejects crypto backdoors as "the wrong solution" | Ars Technica UK - 0 views

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    "Why can't we have cabinet ministers as clued-up as Axelle Lemaire? by Glyn Moody - Jan 14, 2016 3:22pm CET"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Linux 4.2 Released Improving Cryptography Options - 0 views

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    "After eight release candidates, Linux 4.2 is now available, marking one of the longer development cycles in the last few years. The longer cycle was likely only the result of an abundance of caution on Linus Torvalds' part and some travel (Linuxcon) too."
Gary Edwards

EDWARD SNOWDEN: Email Encryption Works Against The NSA - Business Insider - 0 views

  • PGP stands for "Pretty Good Privacy." It uses two "keys," one publicly viewable to the world, the other kept solely to yourself. You can generate PGP keys to your heart's content using the free tool at iGolder and a number of other services around the web.
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    Article covers encryption method "PGP', and encryption tools from "iGolder".  There is also a Chrome Browser plugin for gmail based on "OpenPGP" available but comes with lousy reviews.  Seems there are difficulties with the interface and a complicated method. "Article 12 of the UN's Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that "no one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home, or correspondence." It's that last one that's gotten everyone's attention lately. Just how private is your correspondence online? Depending on your politics, NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden is either a vile turncoat or a revered hero, but either way he has advice on how to stay two steps ahead of the NSA. He held an awesome "press conference" of sorts on The Guardian's website, taking written questions from readers and typing out his answers online. We were most intrigued by his response to a question about encryption. If someone wants to stay off the NSA's radar, could he or she encrypt emails and send them without arousing any suspicion? Snowden's response: "Encryption works. Properly implemented strong crypto systems are one of the few things that you can rely on. Unfortunately, endpoint security is so terrifically weak that NSA can frequently find ways around it.""
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