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Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Wikipedia:Asistente para la creación de artículos - Wikipedia, la enciclopedi... - 0 views

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    "Asistente para la creación de artículos ¡Bienvenido(s) al asistente para la creación de artículos de Wikipedia! Este asistente te ayudará durante el proceso de creación de un artículo en Wikipedia. Para la redacción de un artículo válido, has de seguir unos breves pasos. A medida que avances, el siguiente paso será accesible. En esta página, te ayudaremos a utilizar las herramientas necesarias para redactar tus artículos."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

To Promote the Progress of Science and Useful Arts - 0 views

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    "The Congress shall have power . . . . To promote the progress of science and useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries." (U.S. Constitution, 1787)"
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

How to find free music, images, and video you can use or remix in your own creative wor... - 0 views

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    "Creative Commons Resources Below you will find a list of services and websites that provide content that you can use as building blocks in your own works. From music, to video, to images, these services give you public domain and/or openly licensed (ie. Creative Commons licensed) content that you can reuse in your own work."
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    "Creative Commons Resources Below you will find a list of services and websites that provide content that you can use as building blocks in your own works. From music, to video, to images, these services give you public domain and/or openly licensed (ie. Creative Commons licensed) content that you can reuse in your own work."
Gonzalo San Gil, PhD.

Statute of Anne - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 0 views

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    "The Statute of Anne (c.19), an act of the Parliament of Great Britain, was the first statute to provide for copyright regulated by the government and courts, rather than by private parties. Prior to the statute's enactment in 1710, copying restrictions were authorized by the Licensing Act of 1662. These restrictions were enforced by the Stationers' Company, a guild of printers given the exclusive power to print-and the responsibility to censor-literary works. The censorship administered under the Licensing Act led to public protest; as the act had to be renewed at two-year intervals, authors and others sought to prevent its reauthorisation.[1] In 1694, Parliament refused to renew the Licensing Act, ending the Stationers' monopoly and press restrictions.[2]"
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