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Elizabeth Merritt

Study: Climate change could lead to more hurricanes hitting Northeastern cities | TheHill - 0 views

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    the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's 2021 assessment, which projected an increase in the most intense categories for hurricanes, 4 and 5.
Megan Conn

Climate Change and Us: What Does the Future Hold? - FORA.tv - 0 views

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    Climate Change overview by Long Now Foundation
Ruth Cuadra

Global Insurance Firms offer Resiliency Tools to Climate Risk Cities | Planetizen: The ... - 0 views

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    A report aims to find a common global method for evaluating and addressing climate risk in response to the increasing frequency of catastrophic storms to use by cities in their redevelopment processes.
Megan Conn

California Enters Regional Climate Pact: The California Report | The California Report - 0 views

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    CA joins regional climate pact with OR, WA and British Columbia.
Lisa Eriksen

This wonder of the world has turned off. Are you worried about the climate yet? | Hugh ... - 0 views

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    Environmental concerns must be integrated into personal, political and commercial decisions on every level.
Paul Spitzzeri

Saving Collections - 0 views

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    the future of museum collections and climate change
Megan Conn

Archeologists Race Against Time In Warming Arctic Coasts : NPR - 0 views

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    Forecasting climate change effects on coastal national parks.
Ruth Cuadra

Scientists: Let's Change How We Talk About Climate Change - 0 views

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    What's needed...is a lot more public debate about the risks of inaction. "Risk is something we all understand in our daily lives...and if people were to think more about the risk of inaction, we think they would be more inclined to take action." How can museums help move the conversation forward?
Megan Conn

Around The World, Cities Plan For Extreme Weather : NPR - 1 views

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    A look at how cities are planning for climate change.
Ruth Cuadra

The Future is Fiction: Playful Future-Thinking About Climate Change with FutureCoast - 2 views

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    The heart of the game design seeks to create a playful, inclusive common ground where information and idea sharing happens, where everyone's thoughts about the future have a place, and where a meaningful dialog and a common ground can be created to replace the animosity that these topics can evoke.  And this is done using an "old-time" technology: voicemails!
Megan Conn

Hydropower With a Shrinking Snowpack | KQED's Climate Watch - 0 views

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    "BRec estimates Sierra snowpack could be reduced by half as soon as a decade from now"  Implications for electricity bills.
Megan Conn

Severe Ancient Droughts: A Warning to California - New York Times - 1 views

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    "megadroughts likely to occur"
Elizabeth Merritt

Heatwaves Are Shutting Down Data Centers, Breaking the Internet - 1 views

  • Despite heat waves becoming a common occurrence globally, companies such as Twitter are grossly underprepared for the havoc that intense heat can wreak on the technology industry.
  • backup generators and external power equipment can also be affected by heat waves
Elizabeth Merritt

How Germany Changed Its Mind, and Gave Benin Bronzes Back to Nigeria - The New York Times - 2 views

  • by a changing social consensus about the ethics of holding on to such items, and further strengthened by a backlash against Germany’s flagship cultural project: the Humboldt Forum,
  • Germany’s approach also contrasts with those of the United States and British governments, which have left decisions up to individual institutions
  • some of the most important museums in England cannot return their Benin Bronzes, even if they wanted to, without a change in the law. That includes the British Museum, which owns about 900 of the artifacts, arguably the world’s finest collection.
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  • a key turning point there occurred in 2019, amid growing public pressure.
  • a rising awareness in Germany of its own colonial crimes — including the killing of tens of thousands of Nama and Herero people in what is now Namibia. The atrocity, carried out between 1904 and 1908, is widely seen as the first genocide of the 20th century.
  • Until then, the main vehicle for discussing the return of the Benin Bronzes had been the Benin Dialogue Group, a network founded in 2010 that brought together Nigerian representatives and figures from European museums with bronzes in their collections. The group, however, favored loans over transfers of ownership.
  • The agreement stipulated that all objects that had been obtained “unethically” would be liable for return and directed institutions to facilitate claims by producing publicly available inventories.
  • obstacles remained on the Nigerian side. Although the country had requested the return of the bronzes since the 1970s, there was conflict over who would take ownership of the artifacts. Both the Nigerian government and the oba of Benin, whose family ruled the historical Kingdom of Benin from which they were looted, claimed that they owned the items. Godwin Obaseki, the governor of Edo State, where Benin City is, said he acted as a facilitator to resolve the dispute.
  • Ultimately, he said, the oba’s family, Nigeria’s museum commission and the government of Edo State agreed to join a trust together, with independent directors that oversee the construction and operation of the new museum.
  • the agreement allows for 168 pieces chosen by Nigeria’s museum commission to remain in Germany “so that Benin’s art can be shown to the world.” The approximately 350 other bronzes that were part of the Berlin museum collections will be transported to Nigeria once the pavilion is completed.
  • Edo Museum of West African Art
  • It remains unclear who will pay for the shipment and insurance of the remaining items in Germany, and he noted that the bronzes’ storage and upkeep will come at a considerable cost, including electrical bills for climate control.
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    The foreign minister's trip is the culmination of a yearslong process that upended Germany's approach to handling cultural items unjustly obtained during the colonial period. It is also part of a pioneering model for large-scale restitution, in which ownership is swapped before any artifacts change hands. Crucially, that approach allows for items to be restituted even if the country of origin does not yet have the facilities to store and exhibit them.
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