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Walter Antoniotti

Modern Western Civilization Economic History - 0 views

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    One-Page handout for For Use in History Classes
Walter Antoniotti

Class Project - 3 views

http://www.textbooksfree.org/U.S.%20Terror%20Episodes%20Since%201900.htm

political economy

started by Walter Antoniotti on 12 Aug 16 no follow-up yet
Walter Antoniotti

Building America's Democratic Fedefalist Republic a 2-pqge class handout - 2 views

Building America's Democratic Fedefalist Republic a 2-pqge class handout Important background for everyone especially in an election year. http://www.textbooksfree.org/Building%20America's%20Democr...

poitical economy

started by Walter Antoniotti on 28 Apr 16 no follow-up yet
Walter Antoniotti

Collection of brief studies for economics, history, civivs - 2 views

http://www.textbooksfree.org/Political%20Economy%20Book%20Summaries.htm

learning politics information history government civics economics

started by Walter Antoniotti on 21 Nov 15 no follow-up yet
Walter Antoniotti

Economics Class Notes - 20 views

I add materials and current data weekly http://www.textbooksfree.org/Economics%20Notes.htm suggestions welcome

economics current events data history

started by Walter Antoniotti on 14 May 13 no follow-up yet
Jason Welker

Introduction to Game Theory | Yale Political Science Lecture - 12 views

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    A summer course on game theory from Yale... 
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    Really interesting! The professor, Ben Polak, I believe is hilarious, energetic, great to watch and learn from. Definitely worthwhile watching.
Jason Welker

Economic View - A Dose of Skepticism on Government Spending - NYTimes.com - 5 views

  • the centerpiece is likely to be a huge increase in government spending
  • John Maynard Keynes
  • A main focus was how to avoid, or at least mitigate, the recurring slumps in economic activity.
  • ...17 more annotations...
  • Economic downturns, Mr. Keynes and Mr. Samuelson taught us, occur when the aggregate demand for goods and services is insufficient.
  • Higher consumer spending expands aggregate demand further, raising the G.D.P. yet again. And so on. This positive feedback loop is called the multiplier effect.
  • these Keynesian prescriptions make avoiding depressions seem too easy.
  • each dollar of government spending can increase the nation’s gross domestic product by more than a dollar
  • The solution, they said, was for the government to provide demand when the private sector would not.
  • less than a third of the increase takes the form of private consumption and investment.
  • Professor Ramey estimates that each dollar of government spending increases the G.D.P. by only 1.4 dollars.
  • In practice, however, the multiplier for government spending is not very large
  • If you hire your neighbor for $100 to dig a hole in your backyard and then fill it up, and he hires you to do the same in his yard, the government statisticians report that things are improving.
  • it is unlikely that, having wasted all that time digging and filling, either of you is better off.
  • inefficient spending
  • bridges to nowhere,
  • increase in economic well-being.
  • a rigorous cost-benefit analysis of each government project.
  • To this day, we have yet to come to grips with how to pay for all that the government created during that era
  • a temporary crisis as a pretense for engineering a permanent increase in the size and scope of the government. Believers in limited government have reason to be wary.
  • tax cuts will be a larger piece of the Obama recovery plan than was previously expected.
Walter Antoniotti

Economics Internet Library - 33 views

I have added a two three-parts test reviews for macro and micro. http://www.businessbookmall.com/Economics%20Test%20Review%20Notes.htm Some may also be interested in the Economics section of the ...

economics learning students teachers history current events

Jason Welker

Economics of Disasters « Foundation for Teaching Economics - 4 views

  • This set of lessons looks at a variety of natural disasters – from the Black Death of the Middle Ages to Hurricane Katrina in our too-recent memory, to fears of avian flu pandemics that haunt the future – through the lens of economic analysis. The contexts were chosen to facilitate the teaching of economic reasoning principles not only in economics courses, but also in history and the other social studies disciplines. Each lesson addresses a question that reflects people’s compassionate reaction to news of disaster and develops one or two key tools of economic analysis in answering that question. Case studies of past disasters provide real-world illustrations.
  • disasters
  • This set of lessons looks at a variety of natural disasters – from the Black Death of the Middle Ages to Hurricane Katrina in our too-recent memory, to fears of avian flu pandemics that haunt the future – through the lens of economic analysis. The contexts were chosen to facilitate the teaching of economic reasoning principles not only in economics courses, but also in history and the other social studies disciplines. Each lesson addresses a question that reflects people’s compassionate reaction to news of disaster and develops one or two key tools of economic analysis in answering that question. Case studies of past disasters provide real-world illustrations.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • This set of lessons looks at a variety of natural disasters – from the Black Death of the Middle Ages to Hurricane Katrina in our too-recent memory, to fears of avian flu pandemics that haunt the future – through the lens of economic analysis. The contexts were chosen to facilitate the teaching of economic reasoning principles not only in economics courses, but also in history and the other social studies disciplines. Each lesson addresses a question that reflects people’s compassionate reaction to news of disaster and develops one or two key tools of economic analysis in answering that question. Case studies of past disasters provide real-world illustrations. Program Topics Introduction Addendum to Introduction Lesson 1: Are Disasters Good for the Economy? Lesson 2: When Disaster Strikes, What Can Markets Do? Lesson 3: When Disaster Strikes, What Can Government Do? Lesson 4: When Disaster Strikes, What Can We Do? Lesson 5: Are Disasters “A Disaster” for Lesson Planning? Activities
  • This set of lessons looks at a variety of natural disasters – from the Black Death of the Middle Ages to Hurricane Katrina in our too-recent memory, to fears of avian flu pandemics that haunt the future – through the lens of economic analysis. The contexts were chosen to facilitate the teaching of economic reasoning principles not only in economics courses, but also in history and the other social studies disciplines. Each lesson addresses a question that reflects people’s compassionate reaction to news of disaster and develops one or two key tools of economic analysis in answering that question. Case studies of past disasters provide real-world illustrations.
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    Lesson plans for the Economics classroom for teaching the effects of natural disasters
Bret Willhoit

It's the Inequality, Stupid | Mother Jones - 7 views

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    Some great charts that visually show just how unequal the two America's have become in the last 35 years.  
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