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Contents contributed and discussions participated by mklaas4423

mklaas4423

The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens - Scientific ... - 1 views

  • Magazines are now useless and impossible to understand, for digital natives"
  • using one kind of technology does not preclude them from understanding another.
  • How exactly does the technology we use to read change the way we read? How reading on screens differs from reading on paper is relevant not just to the youngest among us, but to just about everyone who reads—
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • but are we still reading as attentively and thoroughly?
  • do our brains respond differently to onscreen text than to words on paper?
  • Before 1992 most studies concluded that people read slower, less accurately and less comprehensively on screens than on paper. Studies published since the early 1990s, however, have produced more inconsistent results: a slight majority has confirmed earlier conclusions, but almost as many have found few significant differences in reading speed or comprehension between paper and screens.
  • certain tactile experiences of reading on paper that many people miss and, more importantly, prevent people from navigating long texts in an intuitive and satisfying way.
  • and make it a little harder to remember what we read when we are done.
  • There is physicality in reading,"
  • text is a tangible part of the physical world we inhabit. I
  • a text in its entirety as a kind of physical landscape.
  • there's a rhythm to it and a visible record of how far one has traveled.
  • mental map of the text
  • it is there and then it is gone.
  • 72 10th-grade students of similar reading ability to study one narrative and one expository text, each about 1,500 words in length. Half the students read the texts on paper and half read them in pdf files on computers with 15-inch liquid-crystal display (LCD) monitors.
  • making it less taxing cognitively, s
  • serendipity and a sense of control.
  • but also at long-term memory.
mklaas4423

Snow Is Down and Heat Is Up in the Arctic, Report Says - NYTimes.com - 0 views

  • ixth low
  • that melting occurred on almost 40 percent of the ice sheet during the summer, and in August, the ice sheet reflected less of the sunlight than at any time since the beginning of satellite observations in 2000.
  • But she also had no doubts about the long-term trend toward a warmer Arctic with less ice.
  •  
    Saving the Arctic (Module 3 moodle link)
mklaas4423

Best Practices: Creating an LGBT-inclusive School Climate | Teaching Tolerance - 0 views

  • miniature societies
  • how well they interact with their peers.
  • Four of ten LGBT youths say the community in which they live is not accepting of LGBT people, which makes it absolutely imperative that educators respect students’ right to privacy.
  •  
    LGBQT and providing a safe learning environment. 
mklaas4423

How Online School Stacks Up to Traditional College - 0 views

  • Today’s students have a variety of choices when it comes to higher education. They can enroll in traditional “brick-and-mortar” colleges or in online colleges, or even complete their degrees through a combination of both modes, in what are called “hybrid” programs.
  • Both online and traditional higher education has pros and cons. In the end, it is up to each individual to figure out how much time he or she will have to devote to earning a degree, what type of degree program he or she is interested in, and how much he or she can spend on education.
mklaas4423

Consultancy Today for Tomorrow's World.pdf - 0 views

shared by mklaas4423 on 06 Mar 15 - No Cached
  • First the perspective of the classroom must change to become learner centered. Second, students and teachers must enter into a collaboration or partnership with technology in order to create a "community" that nurtures, encourages, and supports the learning process
  • Has the educational system reached the point of development where no further improvement can be expected from current educational technology?
  • This occurs when a teacher consciously decides to designate certain tasks and responsibilities to the technology, so, if the technology is suddenly removed or is unavailable, the teacher cannot proceed with the instruction as planned.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • igure 2. Philosophies of learning and teaching can be viewed as a continuum with extreme educational interpretations of behaviorism (for example, instruction) and cognitivism (for example, construction) at either end. Any one educator's philosophy resides somewhere on this line. The threshold between the two views marks a critical point of "transformation" for an educator.Consider instead a teacher who uses the same spreadsheet to have students build and construct the knowledge themselves, whether it be the principle of mathematical average or a range of "what if" relationships in economics or history. In this case, the product technology of the spreadsheet is directly supporting the idea technology of a "microworld" where students live and experience the content rather than just study it (Dede, 1987; Papert, 1981; Rieber, 1992).What are the most fundamental principles of learning that underlie the most contemporary views of idea technologies that will help all educators enter into the Reorientation phase of adoption? This is the goal of the next section.Contemporary Role of Technology in EducationAmong many educational goals, t
  • Gregory and Denby Associates Figure 2. Philosophies of learning and teaching can be viewed as a continuum with extreme educational interpretations of behaviorism (for example, instruction) and cognitivism (for example, construction) at either end. Any one educator's philosophy resides somewhere on this line. The threshold between the two views marks a critical point of "transformation" for an educator.Consider instead a teacher who uses the same spreadsheet to have students build and construct the knowledge themselves, whether it be the principle of mathematical average or a range of "what if" relationships in economics or history. In this case, the product technology of the spreadsheet is directly supporting the idea technology of a "microworld" where students live and experience the content rather than just study it (Dede, 1987; Papert, 1981; Rieber, 1992).What are the most fundamental principles of learning that underlie the most contemporary views of idea technologies that will help all educators enter into the Reorientation phase of adoption? This is the goal of the next section.Contemporary Role of Technology in EducationAmong many educational goals, three cognitive outcomes are that students should be able to remember, understand, and use information (Perkins, 1992). Apparently, one of these outcomes is very difficult to achieve.
  • Gregory and Denby Associates Figure 2. Philosophies of learning and teaching can be viewed as a continuum with extreme educational interpretations of behaviorism (for example, instruction) and cognitivism (for example, construction) at either end. Any one educator's philosophy resides somewhere on this line. The threshold between the two views marks a critical point of "transformation" for an educator.Consider instead a teacher who uses the same spreadsheet to have students build and construct the knowledge themselves, whether it be the principle of mathematical average or a range of "what if" relationships in economics or history. In this case, the product technology of the spreadsheet is directly supporting the idea technology of a "microworld" where students live and experience the content rather than just study it (Dede, 1987; Papert, 1981; Rieber, 1992).What are the most fundamental principles of learning that underlie the most contemporary views of idea technologies that will help all educators enter into the Reorientation phase of adoption? This is the goal of the next section.Contemporary Role of Technology in EducationAmong many educational goals, three cognitive outcomes are that students should be able to rememb
  • understand, and use information (Perkins, 1992). Apparently, one of these outcomes is very difficult to achieve.
  • Although instruction has traditionally focused on learning specific content, much of contemporary curriculum development focuses on solving problems that require learners to develop ever evolving networks of facts, principles, and procedures. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (1989), for example, suggested that greater emphasis be placed on solving open-ended "real world" problems in small groups, connecting mathematics with other content areas, and using computer-based tools to allow students to speculate and explore interrelationships among concepts rather than spending time on time-consuming calculations. To achieve such goals, learning should take place in environments that emphasize the interconnectedness of ideas across content domains
mklaas4423

Illinois, Chicago Schools Reach Agreement on PARCC Testing - 0 views

  • Becky Vevea, writing for WBEZ Public Radio, reports the CPS CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett said she does not think the test is appropriate for administering to students this year, but added that the state had given her office no choice. One result of this decision is that CPS students will be bombarded with tests for the rest of the school year. Not all students will be taking all the tests, but the number of tests is disruptive, explains Wendy Katten, head of the parent group Raise Your Hand.
  • Currently, Illinois has no “opt out” provision for removal from testing for parents and students.
  • In January, CPS announced it would give the test at only 66 of its over 600 schools, although all schools were instructed to prepare for the test.
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