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Nigel Coutts

Realising the benefits of reflective practice - The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    It is generally accepted that learning is enhanced by the inclusion of deliberate, reflective practice. Indeed the act of reflecting on the impact that our actions have towards the achievement of any goal (learning oriented or other) is shown to have a positive impact. Reflective practice is defined as the praxis (interdependent and integrated theory, practice, research, thought and action) of individuals or groups to move from 'better thinking to better action' as a result of reflection for, in and on learning (Harvey et al. 2010 p140). With this in mind, it is worth considering what reflective practice might look like and to consider it in a range of contemporary contexts. 
Nigel Coutts

Mathematical thinking presents teachers and students with new challenges - The Learner'... - 0 views

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    The shift away from teaching for the rote memorisation of prescribed methods requires teachers to rethink their approach to the discipline. With this new pedagogy comes a need to understand the processes of mathematical thinking in ways not previously required. When we require our students to be able to reason and problem-solve through unique challenges we also require our teachers to have an understanding of the mathematical moves that their learners are likely to call upon.
Nigel Coutts

Bringing Computational Thinking into the Primary Classroom - The Learner's Way - 0 views

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    Primary teachers in New South Wales (NSW) are this year and next integrating a new Science & Technology Curriculum. It brings with it a number of challenges and opportunities and while it has much in common with the existing curriculum, it will require some significant changes.
Nigel Coutts

Thinking in the Wild - Thinking routines beyond the classroom - The Learner's Way - 2 views

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    Despite this being a 'thinking' conference, despite us all being advocates for structured and scaffolded models of thinking, not one group had applied any thinking routines, utilised a collaborative planning protocol or talked about applying an inquiry model or design thinking cycle. It wasn't that we didn't know about them. It wasn't that we don't know how to use them. It wasn't that we don't value them. We had all the knowledge we could desire on the how to and the why of a broad set of thinking tools and anyone of these would have enhanced the process, but we did not use any of them. Why was this the case and what does this reveal about our teaching of these methods to our students?
Nigel Coutts

Initial Reflections on ICOT 2018 - The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    The past five days have provided me with an amazing learning experience as I have attended ICOT 2018. With the conference just wrapped up and with Florida providing another remarkably wet afternoon, here are some initial reflections.  
Nigel Coutts

Project Zero Turns 50 - The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    This year is the fiftieth birthday of Harvard's Project Zero, a research project designed to explore the nature of thinking and learning and from this suggest pedagogies which align with what we know about the mind. For its birthday celebration Project Zero shared insights from its five decades of research with presentations from Howard Gardner, David Perkins, Shari Tasman, Steve Seidel and Daniel Wilson. The presentations revealed the changing nature of the work of Project Zero from its early days and focus on arts education to its current position as a research organisation with broad interests across education but with a focus on thinking, understanding and the workings of the mind.
Nigel Coutts

Learning vs Work in a Culture of Thinking - The Learner's Way - 2 views

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    Earlier this year a group of teachers I work with explored the 'Eight Cultural Forces' identified by Ron Ritchhart of Harvard's Project Zero. In doing so we decided to focus on our use of the term learning instead of the word work. Our goal was to bring our language choices into the spotlight and explore how a more deliberate focus on learning might alter the culture of our classrooms. Two terms later this focus persists and it is worth reflecting on the effect that this has had.
Nigel Coutts

Making the most of opportunities for thinking - The Learner's Way - 4 views

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    What should our goal for student thinking be? How do we scaffold student thinking in ways that are meaningful while developing autonomy and encouraging students to think effectively when we are not there? What would success with thinking strategies look like? These were the challenging questions that Mark Church presented to teachers at the most recent 'Cultures of Thinking Teach Meet' hosted by Masada College.
Nigel Coutts

Tools for sharing thinking - The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    Fortunately there are a number of free tools that do these things and they are available for use on any technology platform as they require nothing more than access to the internet. Recently Eric Sheninger used a set of these tools to give his audience at the Hawker Brownlow Conference on Thinking and Learning in Melbourne a voice.
Nigel Coutts

Ideas - The Learner's Way - 0 views

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    Ask any teacher what they wish they had more of and the most common answer is likely to be time. Schools are inherently busy places and there is always much to be done. We all want to meet the needs of every student, add value to their education with breadth and depth, ensure adequate coverage of the curriculum and include aspects of play and discovery. Add up all that is done in a day over and above face-to-face teaching and you can only wonder at how we manage to fit it all into the time we have. So is there an answer to this dilemma, is there a secret method to finding more time in our schedules to achieve all that we want to?
Dennis OConnor

35 Educational Resources to Encourage Inquiry & Inventive Thinking | Childhood101 - 4 views

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    k-12 flipped / blended ideas. Makes me want to get back into the real time classroom.
Nigel Coutts

Hold your ideas lightly - The Learner's Way - 2 views

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    The history of teaching is littered with ideas that have come and gone. In their day each was the new bright hope, set to transform what we do as teachers and how our students learn. Each new idea had its supporters and detractors and each in turn was replaced by an alternative or simply disappeared from view. Those who have experienced this ebb and flow of ideas have learned to approach the shiny and the new with caution and yet we have all encountered ideas that are so compelling it is difficult to ignore. How might we approach new ideas and innovative practices in ways that ensure our students benefit?
lovinget2

SP15-932C-3608: Green Group: "Moodles and Tools" - Alison Chouinard - Janesville, WI - 0 views

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    "Works Cited: "Mike Schmoker -Webinar". 4 March 2012. YouTube Video. 21 Jan.      2015. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XXsfuqHah4U."
eaglejack

Archive | WIRED - 0 views

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    An awesome web version of a tech-themed magazine. Can provide great subjects for discussion in tech classes. May want to install Google AdBlock Plus if reading with younger groups, but a fun, forward-thinking resource for interesting technology topics!
Sarah Oliver

Transportation Alternatives: T.A. Magazine Article: Provocateur: The Sacred "Rac" - 1 views

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    November/December 1997, p.2An Indian anthropologist, Chandra Thapar, made a study of foreign cultures which had customs similar to those of his native land. One culture in particular fascinated him because it reveres one animal as sacred, much as the people in India revere the cow. This article is to provoke thought in students about the way we view other cultures beliefs and customs. The 'arc' is a car, and the foreign culture is the USA.
Rick Patterson

Jun05_02 - 8 views

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    Critical Thinking is a question that comes up in many of the online classes I've attended, this is a very good article explaining some strategies that may be used
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    Thank you Rick! (Rick is a participant in our Summer 2012 E-Learning Practicum.)
Maggie Rouman

Cognitive Styles | UX Magazine - 3 views

  • But how deep does our understanding of users actually go
  • For over a century, psychologists have been trying to account for the range of individual differences people exhibit when interacting with new information. At the heart of their research lie cognitive styles—the stable attitudes, preferences, and habitual strategies that determine how an individual processes information. Understanding cognitive styles will help us design better experiences for users.
  • Analytic vs. Holistic Thinkers
  • ...9 more annotations...
  • So what?
  • Holistic thinkers: big-picture visionaries
  • Analytic thinkers: brick-by-brick craftsmen
  • Design for wayfinding
  • What do these differences between analytic and holistic thinkers mean for the design of websites and applications? Above all, they should remind us that users are not uniform; there are vast differences between them, and we must design experiences that meet the needs of both types of thinkers
  • Design for learnability
  • Use strong information scent
  • Designing for Cognitive Styles
  • In the words of Edward Tufte, "There are some universal cognitive tasks that are deep and profound—indeed, so deep and profound that it is worthwhile to understand them in order to design our displays in accord with those tasks."
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    This is important to keep in mind when designing f2f or online programs.
Debra Kane

The Critical Thinking Community - 2 views

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    "Critical thinking is the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication as a guide to belief and action. In its exemplary form, it is based on universal intellectual values that transcend subject matter divisions: clarity, accuracy, precision, consistency, relevance, sound evidence, good reasons, depth, breadth, and fairness" (Scriven and Paul, National Council for Excellence in Critical Thinking Instruction)
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    Hi Debra, This is a great website that some of us at my school have been looking at over the last decade. We use the classroom posters and like the way the materials focus on analyzing the parts of the thinking, evaluating thinking with the universal intellectual standards and developing thinking dispositions (and how they are all interconnected). We've used readings from the textbooks and mini-guides with our students extensively. I've considered attending the annual conference or signing up for their online course but have yet to do so. My only criticism is a lot of their material is repackaged under different names and books. However, that wouldn't stop me form giving this a 5-star rating. They even have material translated into Thai which my students in Lao can read if their English isn't strong enough to grasp all the important concepts. Thanks for recommending it!
Dennis OConnor

ISTE | Computational Thinking - 7 views

  • Computational Thinking Toolkit Available CT advocates can use these materials for conference presentations, study groups, or meetings with educators, parents, community, or industry leaders.The toolkit includes a presentation, multimedia, handouts and other materials to help introduce CT to non-computing educators. Download the Computational Thinking Teacher Resources. CSTA and ISTE intend for the CT Teacher Resources to reflect our commitment to the universal idea that CT can work across all disciplines and with all school-age children. The CT Teacher Resources are an introductory package of prototype materials which include:
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