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Anne Bubnic

Putting comprehensive staff development on target - 0 views

  • Many professional development efforts are organized as a smorgasbord of courses offered to educators. The district measures the effort's effectiveness by how many courses staff complete or how satisfied teachers are with the classes offered. District leaders who use the smorgasbord approach may view professional development as an extra that potentially helps an individual's performance but is not absolutely essential. They probably invest little in professional development planning because they don't expect great results.
  • Other district leaders recognize how much professional learning contributes to the district's learning goals for students, and so they align individual, team, school, and system learning plans. At each level, participants consider what outcomes they want for students, the knowledge and skills teachers need, and the professional learning that will help staff achieve the system goals. To be results-driven means following Stephen Covey's advice (1989): "Begin with the end in mind." Once student outcomes are selected, professional development leaders identify the knowledge and skills adults need to help students achieve the district's standards of success. The knowledge and skills linked to the student learning goals become part of the comprehensive professional development curriculum
  • In too many schools, staff development is limited to teachers attending workshops, courses, and conferences. School districts can no longer afford staff development efforts that are predominately "adult pull-out programs." That kind of learning alone will not produce high-level results. Schools will achieve high levels of performance when professional learning is embedded in every school day.
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    Professional development planning focuses attention on how the system as a whole and individuals must change to achieve the district's goals. Rather than being outlined in its own plan, comprehensive professional development becomes a compilation of plans, each supporting different district and/or school priorities. These individual plans are most effective when they attend to what we know about effective professional learning and ensure that staff development is results-driven, standards-based, and focused on educators' daily work.
Anne Bubnic

Assessment without victims: An interview with Rick Stiggins. - 0 views

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    Coaching moves beyond the gym. Assessment without victims: An interview with Rick Stiggins. [Journal of Staff Development]
Anne Bubnic

Nancy Love: Taking Data To New Depths [PDF] - 0 views

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    There's a ton of data being collected. The trick is to know how to use it effectively.
Anne Bubnic

What a difference a word makes. [Rick Stiggins] - 0 views

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    Article by Rick Stiggins [Journal of Staff Development]. Assessment FOR learning rather than assessment OF learning helps students succeed.
Anne Bubnic

Assessment FOR Learning: What a Difference A Word Makes [pdf] - 5 views

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    Article by Rick Stiggins.
Anne Bubnic

Taking data to new depths [Nancy Love] - 0 views

  • While collaborative inquiry is appropriate for any content area, it is particularly relevant for mathematics and science because the process mirrors for the adults what students experience in our best mathematics and science classrooms. Data teams investigate not scientific phenomena or mathematics problems, but how to improve teaching and learning. They raise questions, examine student learning and other data, test their hypotheses, and share findings with their colleagues.
  • Typically, one or two teachers, one administrator, and one NSF project staff member become data facilitators for a school. They then convene school-based data teams to focus on improving mathematics and science. Sometimes team members are from the mathematics or science department or are existing grade-level teams. Other times, the team is schoolwide.
  • If data facilitators have only one source of data on student learning, they collect additional data such as local assessments or common grade-level and course assessments for the next data facilitator session. The process emphasizes triangulating data, using three different sources of student learning data before identifying the student learning problem. By triangulating, data facilitators guide data teams to test hunches with other data instead of drawing conclusions from a single measure.
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  • In their data facilitator workshops, data facilitators use the "go visual" principle, first developed by nonverbal communications expert Michael Grinder (1997). Grinder revealed the power of large, visually vibrant and color-coded displays of data in fostering group ownership and engagement. Data facilitators work with the team on one data report at a time to avoid overload and confusion. For each report, they create a colorful newsprint-sized graph displaying the results and post it on their "data wall." Then they record their observations and inferences on additional pieces of newsprint that they post under their chart. As they work with additional data, they add more graphs and more observations and inferences to their data wall.
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    There's a ton of data being collected. The trick is to know how to use it effectively.
Anne Bubnic

Data Intersections [Victoria Bernhardt] - 0 views

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    Journal of Staff Development. New routes open when one type of data crosses another. As educators become more familiar with collecting and interpreting school data, they can begin "running data at each other," framing questions that require analysis of multiple types of information. Educators can cross two, three, and four categories of data in ways that can provide new insight into student learning and how to improve it.
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