Skip to main content

Home/ CTAP4 Data Assessment/ Group items tagged formative_assessment

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Anne Bubnic

Formative Assessment, Secondary Ed [Video] - 1 views

  •  
    In this program, Paul Black and Chris Harrison, authors of the influential pamphlet Working Inside the Black Box, outline what they see as the key features of formative assessment. They focus on effective questioning, peer and self-assessment, feedback and marking.
Anne Bubnic

Enhancing Student Learning [Rick Stiggins, Jan 2008] - 0 views

  • Both formative assessment and assessment for learning are intended to provide information early enough in the decision-making process to influence student learning. As traditionally conceived, formative assessment helps teachers group students more effectively and select appropriate instructional interventions. The teacher uses the assessment information. However, the litmus test of an effective assessment for learning is that it informs students about their own learning, helping them focus their learning energies where they are likely to be most effective. So formative assessment enlightens the teacher, while assessment for learning enlightens the student
  •  
    Create profound achievement gains through formative assessments
Anne Bubnic

Formative and Summative Assessment in the Classroom - 0 views

  •  
    Successful middle schools engage students in all aspects of their learning. There are many strategies for accomplishing this. One such strategy is student-led conferences. As a classroom teacher or administrator, how do you ensure that the information shared in a student-led conference provides a balanced picture of the student's strengths and weaknesses? The answer to this is to balance both summative and formative classroom assessment practices and information gathering about student learning.
Anne Bubnic

Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards Through Classroom Assessment - 0 views

  •  
    Firm evidence shows that formative assessment is an essential component of classroom work and that its development can raise standards of achievement, Mr. Black and Mr. Wiliam point out. Indeed, they know of no other way of raising standards for which suc
Anne Bubnic

Online Assessment: Put Down Your Pencils - 0 views

  • Online testing will require skills beyond those finely honed copying, collating and stapling skills we have acquired from our years of paper-and-pencil testing. Selecting the online assessment tool that works best for your school district can be facilitated by ensuring communication among all potential users of the application from the beginning of the selection process.

  • While online testing shares many of the same preparation requirements as traditional paper-based tests, they now take different forms. Rather than making sure you have enough printed copies of a test, an evaluation of the viability of online testing should involve a review of a district’s ability to provide for sufficient online access within the schedule for administration.

    For example, based on the number of computers and the network load, how many students can take the assessment during an exam period? Does the software restrict the number of concurrent users? Teachers likely will want the ability to create multiple forms of the test for security within the test administration. Can the application easily provide for this function?  

  • Further, the use of computers for online testing necessitates that students and teachers are already comfortable with using this technology as a regular part of daily instruction. Focused professional development on the usage of the application as well as what to do if things go awry will help the transition for staff. Issues to address could include what to do if a student needs to change an answer after a section of the testing is complete, how are unique log-ins provided for the students or if there is a technical problem during an administration can students resume where they were in the test.

  • ...1 more annotation...
  • While many students are digital natives, they also should be involved in the preparation for the transition to online testing. Their feedback on the format and presentation of the items and the applications’ usability should not be overlooked. A key part of the selection process should also focus on whether the assessment application can provide for accommodations for all learners. For example, does the application provide read-aloud functionality or large print for students with visual impairments? A related consideration is whether the application can provide assessments in a variety of languages for non-native speakers.
  •  
    No. 2 lead pencils might be suffering from "bubbling withdrawal" in many school systems across the country as more schools introduce online testing to assess student learning. Ranging from handheld devices to web-based and local server applications, online testing is now a viable option for formative and summative assessments.
Anne Bubnic

Assessment without victims: An interview with Rick Stiggins. - 0 views

  •  
    Coaching moves beyond the gym. Assessment without victims: An interview with Rick Stiggins. [Journal of Staff Development]
Anne Bubnic

What a difference a word makes. [Rick Stiggins] - 0 views

  •  
    Article by Rick Stiggins [Journal of Staff Development]. Assessment FOR learning rather than assessment OF learning helps students succeed.
Anne Bubnic

How Should We Measure Student Learning? | Edutopia - 0 views

  •  
    We know that the typical multiple-choice and short-answer tests aren't the only way, or necessarily the best way, to gauge a student's knowledge and abilities. Many states are incorporating performance-based assessments into their standardized tests or adding assessment vehicles such as student portfolios and presentations as additional measures of student understanding.
1 - 8 of 8
Showing 20 items per page