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Mark Morton

Female and Minority Law Professors Said to Need Mentors - Faculty - The Chronicle of Hi... - 0 views

  • Law schools should be sure that female and minority professors have mentors and other support to improve their chances of winning tenure,
  • female and minority professors were less likely to win tenure than their white, male colleagues
Mark Morton

A Helping Hand for Young Faculty Members - Faculty - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • "She wasn't really familiar with my discipline, but she was able to give me perspectives about the institution from a different vantage point. I really grew to appreciate that."
  • an increasing number of colleges now rely on formal mentor programs, many of them campuswide, to give new faculty members guaranteed access to senior professors who can help them.
  • These days, actively seeking career guidance within the ivory tower doesn't hold the stigma for new professors that it once did
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • "It used to be sink or swim." Either you were cut out for the professoriate, or you weren't, she says. "But now you walk into a new place and it's not shameful to need help."
  • baffling task of pinning down the right mix of research, teaching, and service that will lead to tenure.
  • On a scale of 1 to 5, with the highest number representing "very important," the mean score for informal mentoring was 4.49. Formal mentoring was slightly less important with a mean score of 4.04.
  • "We try to have multiple pathways for people to engage in finding mentors,"
  • Officials at Yale University are fast-tracking efforts to shape the informal faculty mentors that is common on its campus into a more formal mentor process
  • Ms. Trower says that the more corporate mentorship mode — which includes training mentors and protégés, setting goals, and measuring the end result — isn't yet common in academe. Meanwhile, formal mentor programs do have at least one drawback: a mismatch can result in a strained relationship from which neither party sees a way out.
  • the future of mentor programs for faculty members should include outreach to midcareer professors
Mark Morton

The Catalytic Mentor - Faculty - The Chronicle of Higher Education - 0 views

  • = Premium Content Log In | Create a Free Account | Subscribe Now Wednesday, November 25, 2009 Subscribe Today! Home News Opinion & Ideas Facts & Figures Topics Jobs Advice Forums $('#navbarbtnForums').attr("href", "/forums/"); Events Faculty Administration Technology Community Colleges International Special Reports People The Ticker Current Issue Faculty Home News Faculty function check() { if (document.getElementById("searchInput").value == '' ) { alert('Please enter search terms'); return false; } else return true; } $().ready(function() { $('#email-popup').jqm({trigger: 'a.show-email', modal: 'true'}); $('#share-popup').jqm({trigger: 'a.show-share', modal: 'true'}); }); E-mail function printPage() { window.print(); } $(document).ready(function(){ $('.print-btn').click(printPage); }); Print Share August 1, 2003 The Catalytic Mentor By PIPER FOGG An award-winning chemist at Rutgers U. takes students under her wingHere on the main campus of Rutgers University, Martha Greenblatt often passes buildings that were once part of Camp Kilmer, a military base that received European refugees in the 1950s. An internationally known chemist, the Rutgers professor remembers the camp from her days as a teenager from Hungary, alone and unsure of what lay ahead. Now her lab is filled with smart young graduate students from China, Russia, Turkey, and the United States. Over the years, she has had 27 graduate students and 25 postdoctoral students in her lab. Because of her own personal and professional experiences, she understands what they are going through, and she goes out of her way to guide them. That means pushing them in their research, encouraging them to make outside contacts, even coaching some in English, all to develop in them the skills to become independent thinkers and successful scientists. In the spring, Ms. Greenblatt, 62, received the Francis P. Garvan-John M. Olin Medal, given annually in recognition of significant achievements by a female chemist in America. The American Chemical Society honored her as "a leading solid-state chemist and scholar, teacher, science advocate, and outstanding role model." The award is particularly satisfying to her because it celebrates her serving as a mentor to young scientists. In addition, the university has made her a Board of Governors professor, the highest rank a Rutgers faculty member can hold. In any field, a great mentor can make a big difference. But, in the sciences, such a figure can mean the difference between a lackluster dissertation and a mediocre job offer, on the one hand, and a publication that is a catalys
  • In any field, a great mentor can make a big difference. But, in the sciences, such a figure can mean the difference between a lackluster dissertation and a mediocre job offer, on the one hand, and a publication that is a catalyst for a promising career in academe or industry, on the other. An effective mentor acts as an advocate, a role model, and a guide to academic and professional development.
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