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Todd Suomela

The Scholar's Stage: Teaching the Humanities as Terribly as Possible - 0 views

  • Dive into the past and you will see this theme will emerge time and again: the purpose of studying history, philosophy, and poetry is to help us lead better lives and be better people. The humanities are an education for the soul. Placed next to these paeans to education, the aims of the "Theology of Dostoevsky" course are crippling. Reading Dostoevsky will help students will learn how to "contextualize literature within its anthropological milieu." Dostoevsky will teach them to see "the unique interpretive problems inherent in studying creative genres" and discussing his works will help them "communicate more effectively, verbally and in writing, about theological literature." That is the purpose of reading a man regularly called the best novelist in human history! We read him to "meet academics standards for writing and notation!" How painfully limited.
karch10k

4 Ideas for Improving Education From The Chronicle's 2019 'Shark Tank' - The Chronicle ... - 0 views

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    "Bucknell"
karch10k

GPAs don't really show what students learned. Here's why. - 0 views

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    An interesting look into the problem of GPA not being representative to what a student knows, learned, or can demonstrate in any given course. This certainly isn't a new issue and solutions vary - from competency based education (CBE) to utilizing metrics like GPAM. I think one of the big takeaways here is that utilizing any singular metric to measure student achievement is missing the forest for the trees.
Todd Suomela

Tools for Scaffolding Students in a Complex Learning Environment: What Have We Gained a... - 0 views

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    "This article discusses the change in the notion of scaffolding from a description of the interactions between a tutor and a student to the design of tools to support student learning in project-based and design-based classrooms. The notion of scaffolding is now increasingly being used to describe various forms of support provided by software tools, curricula, and other resources designed to help students learn successfully in a classroom. However, some of the critical elements of scaffolding are missing in the current use of the scaffolding construct. Although new curricula and software tools now described as scaffolds have provided us with novel techniques to support student learning, the important theoretical features of scaffolding such as ongoing diagnosis, calibrated support, and fading are being neglected. This article discusses how to implement these critical features of scaffolding in tools, resources, and curricula. It is suggested that if tools are designed based on the multiple levels of the student understanding found in a classroom, tools themselves might be removed to achieve fading."
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