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Contents contributed and discussions participated by Debora Gomez

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Handbook of Cross-cultural Psychology: Basic processes and human development - John W. ... - 0 views

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    Literacy actually develops skills for life, it has not just academic pourposes
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Redefining roles: librarians as partners in information literacy education - 0 views

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    The importance of a multidisciplinary educational team
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AARL issue 33.3 - 0 views

    • Debora Gomez
       
      How do international associations are handling this concept
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Health Information Literacy and Competencies of Information Age Students: Results From ... - 0 views

  • This study aimed to measure the proficiency of college-age health information consumers in finding and evaluating electronic health information; to assess their ability to discriminate between peer-reviewed scholarly resources and opinion pieces or sales pitches; and to examine the extent to which they are aware of their level of health information competency.
  • health information resources,
  • 55% of Americans with Internet access seek health information online
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • A sample of 400 college-age students was selected because this cohort is the first Information Age generation that has been exposed, for up to one-half of their lives, to the Internet.
  • How proficient are university students at searching for and evaluating health-related information? How well do they understand the difference between peer-reviewed scholarly resources and opinion pieces or sales pitches? How aware are they of their own level of health information competencies?
  • Today, health consumers are actively seeking information and using it to make health decisions
  • Individuals with less education and exposure to information-related activities are expected to have even lower health information competencies than our study participants
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    Develop health information competencies
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Learning and Teaching Information Technology--Computer Skills in Context. ERIC Digest. - 0 views

  • There is clear and widespread agreement among the public and educators that all students need to be proficient computer users or "computer literate." However, while districts are spending a great deal of money on technology, there seems to be only a vague notion of what computer literacy really means. Can the student who operates a computer well enough to play a game, send e-mail or surf the Web be considered computer literate? Will a student who uses computers in school only for running tutorials or an integrated learning system have the skills necessary to survive in our society? Will the ability to do basic word processing be sufficient for students entering the workplace or post-secondary education?
  • Learning and Teaching Information Technology--Computer Skills in Context. ERIC Digest.
  • Learning and Teaching Information Technology--Computer Skills in Context. ERIC Digest.
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  • Curriculum Based on the Big6 Skills Approach
  • Approach
  • Approach
  • technology
  • Learning and Teaching Information Technology--Computer Skills in Context. ERIC Digest.
  • technology

  • ERIC Identifier: ED465377
    Publication Date: 2002-09-00
    Author: Eisenberg, Michael B. - Johnson, Doug
    Source: ERIC Clearinghouse on Information and Technology Syracuse NY.

    Learning and Teaching Information Technology--Computer Skills in Context. ERIC Digest.

    There is clear and widespread agreement among the public and educators that all students need to be proficient computer users or "computer literate." However, while districts are spending a great deal of money on technology, there seems to be only a vague notion of what computer literacy really means. Can the student who operates a computer well enough to play a game, send e-mail or surf the Web be considered computer literate? Will a student who uses computers in school only for running tutorials or an integrated learning system have the skills necessary to survive in our society? Will the ability to do basic word processing be sufficient for students entering the workplace or post-secondary education?

    Clearly not. In too many schools, teachers and students still use computers only as the equivalent of expensive flash cards, electronic worksheets, or as little more than a typewriter. The productivity side of computer use in the general content area curriculum is neglected or grossly underdeveloped (Moursund, 1995).

    Recent publications by educational associations are advocating for a more meaningful use of technology in schools (ISTE, 2000). Educational technologists are clearly describing what students should know and be able to do with technology. They are advocating integrating computer skills into the content areas, proclaiming that computer skills should not be taught in isolation and that separate "computer classes" do not really help students learn to apply computer skills in meaningful ways. There is increasing recognition that the end result of computer literacy is not knowing how to operate computers, but to use technology as a tool for organization, communication, research, and problem solving. This is an important shift in approach and emphasis.

    Moving f

  • Moving from teaching isolated technology skills to an integrated approach
  • Moving from teaching isolated technology skills to an integrated approach

  • ERIC Identifier: ED465377
    Publication Date: 2002-09-00
    Author: Eisenberg, Michael B. - Johnson, Doug
    Source: ERIC Clearinghouse on Information and Technology Syracuse NY.

    Learning and Teaching Information Technology--Computer Skills in Context. ERIC Digest.

    There is clear and widespread agreement among the public and educators that all students need to be proficient computer users or "computer literate." However, while districts are spending a great deal of money on technology, there seems to be only a vague notion of what computer literacy really means. Can the student who operates a computer well enough to play a game, send e-mail or surf the Web be considered computer literate? Will a student who uses computers in school only for running tutorials or an integrated learning system have the skills necessary to survive in our society? Will the ability to do basic word processing be sufficient for students entering the workplace or post-secondary education?

    Clearly not. In too many schools, teachers and students still use computers only as the equivalent of expensive flash cards, electronic worksheets, or as little more than a typewriter. The productivity side of computer use in the general content area curriculum is neglected or grossly underdeveloped (Moursund, 1995).

    Recent publications by educational associations are advocating for a more meaningful use of technology in schools (ISTE, 2000). Educational technologists are clearly describing what students should know and be able to do with technology. They are advocating integrating computer skills into the content areas, proclaiming that computer skills should not be taught in isolation and that separate "computer classes" do not really help students learn to apply computer skills in meaningful ways. There is increasing recognition that the end result of computer literacy is not knowing how to operate computers, but to use technology as a tool for organization, communication, research, and problem solving. This is an important shift in approach and emphasis.

    Moving f

  • Moving from teaching isolated tech
  • Learning and Teaching Information Technology--Computer Skills in Context. ERIC Digest.
  • Learning and Teaching Information Technology--Computer Skills in Context. ERIC Digest.
  • Learning and Teaching Information Technology--Computer Skills in Context. ERIC Digest.
  • Learning and Teaching Information Technology--Computer Skills in Context. ERIC Digest.
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    Introduction to infolit & basis of Big 6
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UNICEF - Basic education and gender equality - Quality of education - 0 views

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    Imagine a textbook written in an indecipherable language, or a blackboard without chalk. Imagine a class being held in a loud concert hall, or a child trying to do homework in the midst of a hurricane. Clearly, when key components of the learning process and context are lacking, education itself is doomed to fail.
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Integrate tech into your classroom - 0 views

started by Debora Gomez on 24 Feb 12 no follow-up yet
  • Debora Gomez
     
    It is a web page specially dedicated for professionals who want to integrate tech into their classrooms so their students become more engaged
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Teacher Reviews New Student Participation App - 0 views

started by Debora Gomez on 21 Feb 12 no follow-up yet
  • Debora Gomez
     
    Many of us have experienced a class with no students participation but we can offer an intresting way to get students involved
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