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Anne Bubnic

Digital Ethics Videos and Lesson Plans - 0 views

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    Learn how to stay out of trouble online by learning about copyright rules, fair use, scams, hoaxes, and flaming. This Nortel LearniT video series offers help on online ethics issues. The site is translated into half-dozen languages, including Spanish.
Anne Bubnic

Internet Safety for Teens: Getting It Right [pdf] - 0 views

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    VERY helpful document!!!

    A growing number of people are promoting Internet Safety Education in effort to keep youngsters safe from Internet sex offenders. But be cautious about some of the statistics that you may find from lectures, pamphlets, videos and web sites. Not all of the data accurately reflects what researchers have learned about cyberpredator crimes. For the real stats and myths vs. realities on child predators , download a copy of: Internet Safety For Teens: Getting it Right . This fact sheet (created by Dr. David Finkelhor at the Crimes Against Children Research Center) is packed with helpful clarifying information for your next presentation.
anonymous

Online Predators and Their Victims - 0 views

  • My (Liz B. Davis ) Summary of Key Points (All are quotes directly from the article): Online "Predators" and Their Victims. Myths, Realities, and Implications for Prevention and Treatment. by: Janis Wolak, David Finkelhor, and Kimberly J. Mitchell - University of New Hampshire and Michele L. Ybarra - Internet Solutions for Kids, Inc.
  • The publicity about online"predators" who prey on naive children using trickery and violence is largely inaccurate.
  • adult offenders who meet, develop relationships with, and openly seduce underage teenagers
  • ...21 more annotations...
  • In the great majority of cases, victims are aware they are conversing online with adults. In the N-JOV Study, only 5% of offenders pretended to be teens when they met potential victims online. (112)
  • Offenders rarely deceive victims about their sexual interests.
  • promises of love and romance
  • 99% of victims of Internet-initiated sex crimes in the N-JOV Study were 13 to 17 years old, and none were younger than 12. 48% were 13 or 14 years old. (115)
  • it was those 15-17 years of age who were most prone to take risks involving privacy and contact with unknown people. (115)
  • take place in isolation and secrecy, outside of oversight by peers, family  members, and others in the youth's face-to-face social networks (115)
  • Most of the online child molesters described in the N-JOV Study met their victims in chatrooms. In a 2006 study, about one third of youths who received online sexual solicitation had received them in chatrooms. (116)
  • Youth internet users with histories of offline sexual or physical abuse appear to be considerably more likely to receive online aggressive sexual solicitations. (117)
  • ..Although Internet safety advocates worry that posting personal information exposes youths to online molesters, we have not found empirical evidence that supports this concern. It is interactive behaviors, such as conversing online with unknown people about sex, that more clearly create risk. (117)
  • Online molesters do not appear to be stalking unsuspecting victims but rather continuing to seek youths who are susceptible to seduction. (117)
  • maintaining online blogs or journals, which are similar to social networking sites in that they often include considerable amounts of personal information and pictures, is not related to receiving aggressive sexual solicitation unless youths also interact online with unknown people. (117)
  • Boys constitute 25% of victims in Internet-initiated sex crimes, and virtually all of their offenders are male. (118
  • Some gay boys turn to the internet to find answers to questions about sexuality or meet potential romantic partners, and there they may encounter adults who exploit them. (118)
  • ..child molesters are, in reality, a diverse group that cannot be accurately characterized with one-dimensional labels. (118)
  • Online child molesters are generally not pedophiles. (118)Online child molesters are rarely violent. (119)
  • Child pornography production is also an aspect of Internet-initiated sex crimes. One in five online child molesters in the N-JOV Study took sexually suggestive or explicit photographs of victims or convinced victims to take such photographs of themselves or friends. (120)
  • Youths may be more willing to talk extensively and about more intimate matters with adults online than in face-to-face environments. (121
  • it may not be clear to many adolescents and adults that relationships between adults and underage adolescents are criminal. (122)
  • Simply urging parents and guardians to control, watch, or educate their children may not be effective in many situations. The adolescents who tend to be the victims of Internet-initiated sex crimes many not themselves be very receptive to the advice and supervision of parents. (122)
  • We recommend educating youths frankly about the dynamics of Internet-initiated and other nonforcible sex crimes. Youths need candid, direct discussions about seduction and how some adults deliberately evoke and then exploit the compelling feelings that sexual arousal can induce. (122)
    • anonymous
       
      Let's remember that although there are direct references to gay and male pedophiles of gay boys, that 99% of child sex offenders identify as heterosexual, online or offline.
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    Cool summary of an article by Liz B. Davis -- Liz took the article and extracted the most valuable bits to her using google Docs. This methodology is fascinating, but even moreso the fact we may all begin doing this together with Diigo.
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    This research article has the facts about sexual predatory behavior.
Anne Bubnic

Snopes.com: Urban Legends Reference Pages - 0 views

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    One of the most comprehensive web sites on the Internet related to Urban Myths and Legends. Whenever I get something even remotely suspicious via email, I always come here first!
Anne Bubnic

Don't Spread that Hoax! - 0 views

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    Students can use this site to learn about sympathy chain letters, urban legends and myths and viruses that are transmitted as email attachments. Generally, these messages are only an annoyance, but internet hoaxes have already cost victims property, reputation, and even endangered their lives.
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