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Barbara Lindsey

udtechtoolkit - home - 0 views

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    Web 2.0 tools with universal design for learning approach
Barbara Lindsey

National Education Technology Plan - 0 views

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    Page 33 discusses eportfolios
Barbara Lindsey

Personalizing Learning - The Important Role of Technology - Open Education - 0 views

  • In Europe, students in each and every school are expected to have access to a safe and secure personal online learning space. In fact, that commitment has been in place since March of 2008.
  • personalization requires an end to the days of teachers going inside a classroom and closing their door to the outside world.
Barbara Lindsey

eduTecher.net - 0 views

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    Incredibly well-organized, collaborative resource for educationally focused tech environments, including reviews, how-tos, iPhone app.
Barbara Lindsey

eduTecher.net - 0 views

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    Awesome videos showing ed tech tools
Barbara Lindsey

The Edge of Tomorrow - 0 views

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    A blog, wiki and podcast about education, technology and technologically educational revolution by Ben Grey and others.
Barbara Lindsey

Interesting Ways | edte.ch - 0 views

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    Great set of presentations showcasing how to use tech tools for classroom learning by Tom Barrett and colleagues around the world. Wonderful example of crowdsourcing.
Barbara Lindsey

Microsoft is Dead - 0 views

  • everyone can see the desktop is over. It now seems inevitable that applications will live on the web—not just email, but everything, right up to Photoshop.
  • The third cause of Microsoft's death was broadband Internet. Anyone who cares can have fast Internet access now. And the bigger the pipe to the server, the less you need the desktop.
  • All the computer people use Macs or Linux now. Windows is for grandmas, like Macs used to be in the 90s. So not only does the desktop no longer matter, no one who cares about computers uses Microsoft's anyway.
Barbara Lindsey

CITE Journal Article: If We Didn't Have the Schools We Have Today, Would We Create the... - 0 views

  • chools resist change, because they are designed to resist change. They are cultural organizations, and cultural organizations are not supposed to change. Cultures are designed to preserve existing solutions to problems—considerable social and economic capital goes into developing culturally valued solutions to problems and change is risky.   Stability reduces risk—“change is bad”—and our schools have been designed to focus on the knowledge transmission mode of learning.
  • This is just what many teachers and faculty members are saying, “We don’t have time for this. We are good teachers, and we can continue to serve our students well with the instructional strategies we have always used. Besides, with the time demands on us, we don’t have time to learn this new technology. As good teachers, we are doing well with our students and we don’t need to go through this transition.”
  • The learning revolution is about constructivist learning, and these new communication and information technologies allow us to facilitate constructive learning in ways that we could never do before. They are becoming cognitive amplifiers that will accelerate learning and the development of new knowledge in the same ways that machines accelerated production during the industrial revolution.
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  • The third reason schools will be driven to change is that we have now reached a point where work is learning . Work in the workplace is learning.   Work in the larger community surrounding the schools is about learning every day.   It's not just about putting bolts on things anymore.
  • The fourth force is that learning communities have no boundaries .   In a networked learning community, schools and classrooms will simply become nodes in a larger learning environment.
  • The fifth factor affecting schools is that the home is becoming a learning place .
  • The final force driving change in schools is kid power.  
  • New learning teams are emerging, which consist of college faculty, the teacher candidates, and the in-service teachers. The high school students themselves are sometimes members of these teams, developing new applications of technology. They are becoming learning communities, “communities of practice,” as some would call it.   And in these learning communities, the distinctions between “teacher” and “student” no longer serve us well. That is why I believe education is rapidly moving toward new learning environments that will have no teachers or students—just learners with different levels and areas of expertise collaboratively constructing new knowledge.
  • There is no way for the faculty or teachers to collaboratively learn and construct new knowledge in this system—no way for them to know whether the knowledge that might have been acquired by the student teacher is actually the knowledge the student teacher then conveys as a teacher to the K-12 students. Few, if any, of the educators know anything about what the K-12 students might be doing with any of the knowledge they may have acquired after they leave the K-12 classroom.   This is a linear, fragmented teaching approach—the epitome of the factory-era assembly line approach to teaching and learning—which defeats any opportunity for collaborative learning or feedback across the various levels of teaching and teacher preparation.
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    expert learners (we call them teachers, educators, scientists, and researchers today) are going to be recognized for their ability to learn and help others learn, as they continue to construct new knowledge and develop their own expertise.
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