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Bo Adams

Better Brainstorming - 0 views

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    HT Nicole Martin
T.J. Edwards

Human-Centered, Systems-Minded Design | Stanford Social Innovation Review - 1 views

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    Using human centered design and systems thinking to redesign "subs" experience in schools
Bo Adams

The Inspiration Walk - Stanford d.school - 0 views

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    HT @ChrisAndres003
Bo Adams

Education innovator advocates for transdisciplinary 'StudioLab' | Cornell University Co... - 1 views

  • “Design thinking is a collaborative, interdisciplinary problem-solving approach to social innovation, organizational change, and product development that has been used in design, engineering, and education industries,” he says.
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    "A 21st century learning approach requires more than rows of fixed seats, says Jon McKenzie. In a new transdisciplinary pedagogy that encourages active learning, McKenzie has combined the kinds of conceptual, aesthetic, and technical learning found in seminar, studio, and lab spaces into an approach he calls "StudioLab.""
Bo Adams

Using Design Principles to Build a Culture of Innovation | Edutopia - 0 views

  • two essential design practices: changing your point of view and prototyping
  • To get started with prototyping, come up with the smallest possible experiment to see if you’re on the right track and avoid the tyranny of the rollout.
Bo Adams

Yes, Design Thinking Is Bullshit…And We Should Promote It Anyway - 2 views

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    This guy's got it. Lee-Sean Huang FTW. Should have read this before watching the video from Natasha. Either way, I'm glad I did end up reading it. I really love how he went deeper with his research into the stories... dare I say he did a little "Five Whys" work? Or would that just be a buzzword? :-)
Bo Adams

Natasha Jen: Design Thinking is Bullshit on Vimeo - 1 views

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    Not sure I agree with Natasha on her "crit" of design thinking. Not sure her retorts to some of the examples hold water. Would love to hear your takeaways from this video, Bo. I like her endpoint, about designers surrounding themselves with evidence of their work and their high standards, but not much else.
Jim Tiffin Jr

Design Thinking 3: Composting Prototypes on Vimeo - 2 views

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    How failed ideas make the next ideas you grow in your garden richer. HT @MeghanCureton
Jim Tiffin Jr

Your Team Is Brainstorming All Wrong - 2 views

  • demonstrate that groups that use Osborn’s rules of brainstorming come up with fewer ideas (and fewer good ideas) than the individuals would have developed alone.
  • There are several reasons for this productivity loss, as academics call it. For one, when people work together, their ideas tend to converge. As soon as one person throws out an idea, it affects the memory of everyone in the group and makes them think a bit more similarly about the problem than they did before. In contrast, when people work alone, they tend to diverge in their thinking, because everyone takes a slightly different path to thinking about the problem.
  • Early in creative acts it’s important to diverge, that is, to think about what you are doing in as many ways as possible. Later, you want to converge on a small number of paths to follow in more detail.
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  • Many techniques use a structure like this. For example, in the 6-3-5 method, six people sit around a table and write down three ideas. They pass their stack of ideas to the person on their right, who builds on them. This passing is done five times, until everyone has had the chance to build on each of the ideas. Afterward, the group can get together to evaluate the ideas generated.
    • Jim Tiffin Jr
       
      The 6-3-5 technique summarized.
  • allow individual work during divergent phases of creativity and group work during convergent phases.
    • Jim Tiffin Jr
       
      Here is the key to the most productive brainstorming techniques.
  • First, it’s hard for people to describe spatial relationships, so any solution that requires a spatial layout is better described with pictures than with words. Second, a large amount of the brain is devoted to visual processing, so sketching and interpreting drawings increases the involvement of those brain regions in idea generation. Third, it is often difficult to describe processes purely in words, so diagrams are helpful.
  • It’s important that groups have time to explore enough ideas that they can consider more than just the first few possibilities that people generate.
  • Many brainstorming sessions involve people talking about solutions. That biases people toward solutions that are easy to talk about. It may also lead to solutions that are abstract and may never work in practice.
  • a combination of drawing and writing is ideal for generating creative solutions to problems
  • t is often important to spend time agreeing on the problem to be solved. A whole round of divergence and convergence on the problem statement can be done before giving people a chance to suggest solutions. 
    • Jim Tiffin Jr
       
      Wonder if there is a place for this in our HMW work?
  • To develop stronger ideas, you need to manage the conversation so that the team doesn’t converge on a solution before everyone hears what others are thinking.
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    "Early in creative acts it's important to diverge, that is to think about what you are doing in as many ways as possible. Later, you want to converge on a small number of paths to follow in more detail."
Jim Tiffin Jr

Brainswarming: Because Brainstorming Doesn't Work - HBR Video - 0 views

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    HBR video outlining a idea generating technique called Brainswarming. Putting goals at the top, and resources at the bottom, and letting possibilities converge.
T.J. Edwards

When Everyone Is Doing Design Thinking, Is It Still a Competitive Advantage? - 0 views

  • Design thinking has come a long way since I wrote about it here in 2008. The most valuable company in the world places design at the center of everything it does. Designers are on the founding team of countless disruptive startups. Domains such as healthcare, education, and government have begun to prototype, iterate, and build more nimbly with a human-centered focus.

    Now that design thinking is everywhere, it’s tempting to simply declare it dead—to ordain something new in its place. It’s a methodology always in pursuit of unforeseen innovation, so reinventing itself might seem like the smart way forward. But in practice, design thinking is a set of tools that can grow old with us.

  • And I’d argue that in order to create sustained competitive advantage, businesses must be not just practitioners, but masters of the art.
    • T.J. Edwards
       
      A favorite DT story. It is a central chapter in Glimmer by Warren Berger.
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    • T.J. Edwards
       
      This is an incredible document. UK's comprehensive Tech+Design curriculum work has been a favorite of mine to follow. This doc, though, shows a larger scale transformation using design. Worth considering for MVx
  • Company evangelists handed out Moleskines with tips on “how to be better-makers,” and an internal tool (built on IDEO’s OI Engine) helps teams master design thinking through open-platform challenges.
  • Design thinking even shows up in the questions asked during reviews, when employees are evaluated on how successfully they’re building its principles into everyday work.
  • Getting to that kind of mastery is our challenge for the next decade. How might organizations build deep design thinking skills and creative leadership at all levels?
  • host of resources
    • T.J. Edwards
       
      Can MVIFI be added to this list? A void/need to be filled?
  • That’s not an inborn ability, it’s a skill—OK, a mastery—learned over many years of doing
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