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dr tech

8 Skilled Jobs That May Soon Be Replaced by Robots - 0 views

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    "Unskilled manual laborers have felt the pressure of automation for a long time - but, increasingly, they're not alone. The last few years have been a bonanza of advances in artificial intelligence. As our software gets smarter, it can tackle harder problems, which means white-collar and pink-collar workers are at risk as well. Here are eight jobs expected to be automated (partially or entirely) in the coming decades. Call Center Employees call-center Telemarketing used to happen in a crowded call center, with a group of representatives cold-calling hundreds of prospects every day. Of those, maybe a few dozen could be persuaded to buy the product in question. Today, the idea is largely the same, but the methods are far more efficient. Many of today's telemarketers are not human. In some cases, as you've probably experienced, there's nothing but a recording on the other end of the line. It may prompt you to "press '1' for more information," but nothing you say has any impact on the call - and, usually, that's clear to you. But in other cases, you may get a sales call and have no idea that you're actually speaking to a computer. Everything you say gets an appropriate response - the voice may even laugh. How is that possible? Well, in some cases, there is a human being on the other side, and they're just pressing buttons on a keyboard to walk you through a pre-recorded but highly interactive marketing pitch. It's a more practical version of those funny soundboards that used to be all the rage for prank calls. Using soundboard-assisted calling - regardless of what it says about the state of human interaction - has the potential to make individual call center employees far more productive: in some cases, a single worker will run two or even three calls at the same time. In the not too distant future, computers will be able to man the phones by themselves. At the intersection of big data, artificial intelligence, and advanced
dr tech

A $7 PC: Keepod Launches Project To Give African Slums Computer Access | Social Awareness - 0 views

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    "Since Keepod's technology enables the computer to boot from the USB device and use the Keepod OS, old computers can be reused, since hardware requirements are not an issue. This way, each person can be given their "own" computer by using an old computer as a "shell." The cost of each system is a mere $7 - a fraction of the cost of an actual PC"
dr tech

CryptoLocker Is The Nastiest Malware Ever - Here's What You Can Do - 0 views

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    "Ransomware is an especially odious type of malware. The way it works is simple. Your computer will be infected with some malicious software. That software then renders your computer entirely unusable, sometimes purporting to be from local law enforcement and accusing you of committing a computer crime or viewing explicit pictures of children. It then demands monetary payment, either in the form of a ransom or a 'fine' before access to your computer is returned."
dr tech

Computer Scientist Publishes Manifesto for Expressive Algorithmic Music | Motherboard - 0 views

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    "Generally, it questions the advance of computing in the absence of a deeper knowledge of how the human brain perceives the world to be computed. We want computers to have perception, yet we know little about the workings of our own human perception."
dr tech

Massive Disruption Is Coming With Quantum Computing - 0 views

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    "Moore's Law (or the exponential growth of integrated circuits) is actually referring to the fifth paradigm of computation. Here's the list of the underlying technologies: (1) Electromechanical; (2) Vacuum Tube; (3) Relay; (4) Transistors; and (5) Integrated Circuits. Quantum computers may well be the sixth paradigm, given that they work in a fashion that is entirely different from "classical" computers"
dr tech

Breathe Easy Bitcoiners, Quantum Computing No Match For Sha-2 Encryption | Hacked - 0 views

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    "Some people assume that once quantum computing comes along modern encryption technologies will be outpowered. But experts are starting to posit that hash functions and asymmetric encryption could defend not only against modern computers, but also against quantum attackers from the future."
dr tech

US nuclear arsenal controlled by 1970s computers with 8in floppy disks | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "The US military's nuclear arsenal is controlled by computers built in the 1970s that still use 8in floppy disks. A report into the state of the US government, released by congressional investigators, has revealed that the country is spending around $60bn (£40.8bn) to maintain museum-ready computers, which many do not even know how to operate any more, as their creators retire."
dr tech

Google, NASA's quantum computer is 100 million times faster than yours - 0 views

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    "Google and NASA announced at an event at NASA's Ames Research Center that the D-Wave quantum computer they bought in 2013 has proven itself to be 100 million times faster than a conventional single-core computer"
dr tech

Hey, Computer Scientists! Stop Hating on the Humanities | WIRED - 0 views

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    "My personal coding projects have presented similarly thorny ethical questions. Should I write a computer program that will download the communications of thousands of teenagers suffering from eating disorders posted on an anorexia advice website? Write a program to post anonymous, suicidal messages on hundreds of college forums to see which colleges offer the most support? My answer to these questions, incidentally, was "no". But I considered it. And the glory and peril of computers is that they magnify the impact of your whims: an impulse becomes a program that can hurt thousands of people."
dr tech

The Guardian view on machine learning: a computer cleverer than you? | Editorial | Opinion | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "It is in the nature of AI that makers do not, and often cannot, predict what their creations do. We know how to make machines learn. But programmers do not understand completely the knowledge that intelligent computing acquires. If we did, we wouldn't need computers to learn to learn."
dr tech

NSA Building Computer to Break 'Nearly Every Kind of Encryption' [REPORT] - 0 views

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    "The agency has invested nearly $80 million to build a computer that could break "nearly every kind of encryption," according to a Washington Post report published online Thursday. Based on documents provided by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, the Post reports the NSA is racing to build a "cryptologically useful quantum computer" research program called "Penetrating Hard Targets.""
dr tech

Chaos Computer Club claims it can reproduce fingerprints from people's public photos | VentureBeat | Security | by Emil Protalinski - 0 views

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    "Chaos Computer Club, Europe's largest association of hackers, claims it can reproduce your fingerprints from a couple of photos that show your fingers. At the 31st annual Chaos Computer Club convention in Hamburg, Germany, Jan Krissler, also known by his alias "Starbug," explained how he copied the thumbprint of German Defense Minister Ursula von der Leyen"
dr tech

US military aims to create cyborgs by connecting humans to computers | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "The US government is researching technology that it hopes will turn soldiers into cyborgs, allowing them to connect directly to computers. The US military's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Darpa) has unveiled a research programme called Neural Engineering System Design (NESD) which aims to develop an implantable neural interface, connecting humans directly to computers."
dr tech

Science relies on computer modelling, but what happens when it goes wrong? -- Science & Technology -- Sott.net - 0 views

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    Much of current science deals with even more complicated systems, and similarly lacks exact solutions. Such models have to be "computational" - describing how a system changes from one instant to the next. But there is no way to determine the exact state at some time in the future other than by "simulating" its evolution in this way. Weather forecasting is a familiar example; until the advent of computers in the 1950s, it was impossible to predict future weather faster than it actually happened.
dr tech

Computer science students should learn to cheat, not be punished for it - 0 views

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    "There's a certain irony that, in fields outside of computer science, plagiarism is a sign that you didn't understand the question. Within computer science, the opposite is true. Not only have you found an acceptable solution, you've understood it enough to use it within the parameters of your own project."
dr tech

Physicists reverse time using quantum computer | EurekAlert! Science News - 0 views

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    "Interestingly, the time reversal algorithm itself could prove useful for making quantum computers more precise. "Our algorithm could be updated and used to test programs written for quantum computers and eliminate noise and errors," Lebedev explained."
dr tech

Computer Programing Could Soon Be Considered a Foreign Language in One State - PolicyMic - 0 views

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    "Legislation passed last week by the Kentucky Senate will allow computer programming classes to count toward fulfilling high school foreign-language requirements in public schools."
dr tech

How do Optical and Quantum Computers work? - 0 views

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    "…in about ten years or so, we will see the collapse of Moore's Law. In fact, already, we see a slowing down of Moore's Law. Computer power simply cannot maintain its rapid exponential rise using standard silicon technology. - Dr. Michio Kaku - 2012"
dr tech

The Downfall of Computers - David Koff - Medium - 0 views

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    "These exploits are based on chip engineering flaws, not on software flaws. Apple, Google, Abode, Microsoft, and other software companies didn't write poor software or bad Operating Systems to cause these problems to occur. Rather, the chip manufacturers - Intel, AMD and ARM - designed and then engineered computer chips with flaws built into them. Once discovered, those flaws allow the Meltdown and Spectre exploits to be run. Worse, these chips have been sold with consumer computers, servers and mobile devices since 1995. so the impact is, potentially, both personal and global in scope."
dr tech

Computer says: um, er... | Computers v humans | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    Great article - worth a read through...
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