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dr tech

Report: someone is already selling user data from defunct Canadian retailer's auctioned-off servers / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "When Vancouver tech retailer NCIX went bankrupt, it stopped paying its bills, including the bills for the storage where its servers were being kept; that led to the servers being auctioned off without being wiped first, containing sensitive data -- addresses, phone numbers, credit card numbers, passwords, etc -- for thousands of customers. Also on the servers: tax and payroll information for the company's employees."
dr tech

What happens when most of China visits your website? It dies a horrible death | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "DNS (Domain Name System) is the system which translates web addresses, such as google.com, into an IP address, such as 74.125.224.72/. A network requires the latter to actually access a website, but if the look-up system gets confused, it can give the wrong IP address - which appears to be what happened in the Iconfactory's case. Except that rather than one DNS server messing up, it was the server for the whole of China."
dr tech

What is HTTP/2 and is it going to speed up the web? | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "HTTP/2 is a more modern protocol that essentially speeds web browsing up using new ways of transporting data between the browser and server across the internet. It is backwards compatible with HTTP1.1 and uses most of the same technologies, but it is more efficient and allows servers to respond with more content than was originally requested, removing the need for the user's computer to continually send requests for more information until a website is fully loaded."
Max van Mesdag

Gamasutra - News - World Of Warcraft China Downtime Continues In NetEase Transition - 1 views

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    The world's most popular multiplayer online role-playing game, World of Warcraft, has lost half of its players as servers in China have been taken offline. Will this be their downfall?
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    Do you think this is in the area of business and employment or arts, entertainment and leisure?
dr tech

Web host 123-reg deletes sites in clean-up error - BBC News - 0 views

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    "The company, which hosts 1.7m sites in the UK, said an error made during maintenance "effectively deleted" what was on some of its servers. "We can conclude that the issues faced have resulted in some data loss for some customers," the firm admitted. It started a "recovery process", but advised customers with their own data backup to rebuild their own websites."
dr tech

Lavabit competitor Silent Circle shuts down its secure email service, destroys servers - Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "Silent Circle, a secure communications company founded by PGP creator Phil Zimmerman, has pre-emptively shut down its secure, encrypted email service and destroyed the servers so that it cannot be forced to reveal its customers' secrets to NSA spooks. "
Ali Atakan

Hardware and software approaches to improve virtual server reliability - 0 views

  • Hardware and software approaches to improve virtual server reliability
dr tech

Face recognition app taking Russia by storm may bring end to public anonymity | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Unlike other face recognition technology, their algorithm allows quick searches in big data sets. "Three million searches in a database of nearly 1bn photographs: that's hundreds of trillions of comparisons, and all on four normal servers. With this algorithm, you can search through a billion photographs in less than a second from a normal computer," said Kabakov, during an interview at the company's modest central Moscow office. The app will give you the most likely match to the face that is uploaded, as well as 10 people it thinks look similar."
dr tech

Viral anime photo filter app Meitu sparks security and privacy concerns - 0 views

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    "But when you dive into the code of Meitu, that's where things get interesting. Security researchers have jumped in to assess the photo editing app and found that it was indeed collecting information, including a phone's IMEI number (a handset's unique ID number), and sending it back to remote servers:"
dr tech

Major sites including New York Times and BBC hit by 'ransomware' malvertising | Technology | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "The malware was delivered through multiple ad networks, and used a number of vulnerabilities, including a recently-patched flaw in Microsoft's former Flash competitor Silverlight, which was discontinued in 2013. When the infected adverts hit users, they redirect the page to servers hosting the malware, which includes the widely-used (amongst cybercriminals) Angler exploit kit. That kit then attempts to find any back door it can into the target's computer, where it will install cryptolocker-style software, which encrypts the user's hard drive and demands payment in bitcoin for the keys to unlock it."
dr tech

Man accidentally 'deletes his entire company' with one line of bad code | News | Lifestyle | The Independent - 0 views

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    "A man appears to have deleted his entire company with one mistaken piece of code. By accidentally telling his computer to delete everything in his servers, hosting provider Marco Marsala has seemingly removed all trace of his company and the websites that he looks after for his customers."
dr tech

Your iPhone is now encrypted. The FBI says it'll help kidnappers. Who do you believe? | Trevor Timm | Comment is free | theguardian.com - 0 views

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    "Given the government's obsession with passing cybersecurity legislation, you would think they'd be happy that Apple and Google are making it harder for foreign governments and criminals to break into people's phones or company servers to steal your data. But you'd be forgetting that the head of the FBI and his fellow fear-mongerers are still much more concerned with making sure they retain control over your privacy, rather than protecting everyone's cybersecurity."
dr tech

Hundreds of US police forces have distributed malware as "Internet safety software" - Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "But Computercop isn't security software -- quite the opposite; it's classic malware. The software, made in New York by a company that markets to law enforcement, is a badly designed keylogger that stores thingstyped into the keyboard -- potentially everything typed on the family PC -- passwords, sensitive communications, banking logins, and more, all stored on the hard drive, either in the clear, or with weak, easily broken encryption. And Computercop users are encouraged to configure the software to email dumps from the keylogger to their accounts (to spy on their children's activity), so that all those keystrokes are vulnerable to interception by anyone between your computer and your email server. "
dr tech

Shellshock: The 'Bash Bug' That Could Be Worse Than Heartbleed - 0 views

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    "Security researchers have discovered a vulnerability in the system software used in millions of computers, opening the possibility that attackers could execute arbitrary commands on web servers, other Linux-based machines and even Mac computers."
dr tech

Beware of This Dangerously Convincing Google Docs Phishing Scam - 0 views

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    ""The fake page is actually hosted on Google's servers and is served over SSL, making the page even more convincing," Symantec security expert Nick Johnston explained in a blog post. "The scammers have simply created a folder inside a Google Drive account, marked it as public, uploaded a file there, and then used Google Drive's preview feature to get a publicly accessible URL to include in their messages.""
dr tech

Turkey orders block of Twitter's IP addresses - Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "Just a few days after Turkey's scandal-rocked government banned Twitter by tweaking national DNS settings, the state has doubled down by ordering ISPs to block Twitter's IP addresses, in response to the widespread dissemination of alternative DNS servers, especially Google's 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 (these numbers were even graffitied on walls). "
dr tech

ISPs caught sabotaging their customers' email encryption - Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "But ISPs in the USA and Thailand have been caught sabotaging STARTTLS, interrupting the negotiation between mail-servers to prevent the encryption bit from being turned on, leaving millions of peoples' email liable to snooping by crooks, governments, spies and others. "
dr tech

Why US elections remain 'dangerously vulnerable' to cyber-attacks | US news | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Cybersecurity experts have warned for years that malfeasance, technical breakdown or administrative incompetence could easily wreak havoc with electronic systems and could go largely or wholly undetected. This is a concern made much more urgent by Russia's cyber-attacks on political party servers and state voter registration databases in 2016 and by the risk of a repeat - or worse - in this November's midterms. "
dr tech

The Downfall of Computers - David Koff - Medium - 0 views

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    "These exploits are based on chip engineering flaws, not on software flaws. Apple, Google, Abode, Microsoft, and other software companies didn't write poor software or bad Operating Systems to cause these problems to occur. Rather, the chip manufacturers - Intel, AMD and ARM - designed and then engineered computer chips with flaws built into them. Once discovered, those flaws allow the Meltdown and Spectre exploits to be run. Worse, these chips have been sold with consumer computers, servers and mobile devices since 1995. so the impact is, potentially, both personal and global in scope."
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