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This AI Knows Who You Are by the Way You Walk - 0 views

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    "Neural networks can find telltale patterns in a person's gait that can be used to recognize and identify them with almost perfect accuracy, according to new research published in IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence. The new system, called SfootBD, is nearly 380 times more accurate than previous methods, and it doesn't require a person to go barefoot in order to work. It's less invasive than other behavioral biometric verification systems, such as retinal scanners or fingerprinting, but its passive nature could make it a bigger privacy concern, since it could be used covertly."
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This school scans classrooms every 30 seconds through facial recognition technology - 0 views

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    "The system is called as"Intelligent Classroom Behavior Management System" and it is being used at Hangzhou No. 11 High School. With scanning facial expressions the system has the ability to even analysis six types of behaviors by the students such as standing up, reading, writing, hand raising, listening to the teacher, and leaning on the desk."
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Chinese schools are testing AI that grades papers almost as well as teachers | VentureBeat - 0 views

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    "It is also self-improving. The 10-year-old grading software leverages deep learning algorithms to "compare notes" with human teachers' scores, suggestions, and comments. An engineer involved in the project compared its capabilities to those of AlphaGo, the record-breaking AI Go player developed by Google subsidiary DeepMind."
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Police trial AI software to help process mobile phone evidence | UK news | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "Cellebrite, the Israeli-founded and now Japanese-owned company behind some of the software, claims a wider rollout would solve problems over failures to disclose crucial digital evidence that have led to the collapse of a series of rape trials and other prosecutions in the past year. However, the move by police has prompted concerns over privacy and the potential for software to introduce bias into processing of criminal evidence."
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Welsh police wrongly identify thousands as potential criminals | UK news | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "However, according to data on the force's website, 92% (2,297) of those were found to be "false positives".

    South Wales police admitted that "no facial recognition system is 100% accurate", but said the technology had led to more than 450 arrests since its introduction. It also said no one had been arrested after an incorrect match."
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'Being cash-free puts us at risk of attack': Swedes turn against cashlessness | World n... - 0 views

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    ""When you have a fully digital system you have no weapon to defend yourself if someone turns it off," he says.

    "If Putin invades Gotland [Sweden's largest island] it will be enough for him to turn off the payments system. No other country would even think about taking these sorts of risks, they would demand some sort of analogue system.""
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Software 'no more accurate than untrained humans' at judging reoffending risk | US news... - 0 views

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    "The algorithm, called Compas (Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions), is used throughout the US to weigh up whether defendants awaiting trial or sentencing are at too much risk of reoffending to be released on bail.

    Since being developed in 1998, the tool is reported to have been used to assess more than one million defendants. But a new paper has cast doubt on whether the software's predictions are sufficiently accurate to justify its use in potentially life-changing decisions."
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How white engineers built racist code - and why it's dangerous for black people | Techn... - 0 views

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    "The lack of answers the Jacksonville sheriff's office have provided in Lynch's case is representative of the problems that facial recognition poses across the country. "It's considered an imperfect biometric," said Garvie, who in 2016 created a study on facial recognition software, published by the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown Law, called The Perpetual Line-Up. "There's no consensus in the scientific community that it provides a positive identification of somebody.""
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Computer says no: why making AIs fair, accountable and transparent is crucial | Science... - 0 views

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    "In October, American teachers prevailed in a lawsuit with their school district over a computer program that assessed their performance.

    The system rated teachers in Houston by comparing their students' test scores against state averages. Those with high ratings won praise and even bonuses. Those who fared poorly faced the sack.

    The program did not please everyone. Some teachers felt that the system marked them down without good reason. But they had no way of checking if the program was fair or faulty: the company that built the software, the SAS Institute, regards its algorithm a trade secret and would not disclose its workings."
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College installs facial recognition to make sure students don't get friends to sign in ... - 0 views

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    "The facial recognition system is currently being rolled out across six of Prof Shen's classes.

    "The new system saves time and reduces the workload of students," Prof Shen told the Beijing News. "Out of one hundred students, it usually only fails to recognise one student."

    But obviously, not everyone is a fan."
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Harvard Study Proves Apple Slows Down old iPhones to Sell Millions of New Models - Anon... - 0 views

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    "People have made the anecdotal observation that their Apple products become much slower right before the release of a new model.

    Now, a Harvard University study has done what any person with Google Trends could do, and pointed out that Google searches for "iPhone slow" spiked multiple times, just before the release of a new iPhone each time."
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Techniques for reliably fooling AI machine-vision classifiers / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "The Open AI researchers were intrigued by a claim that self-driving cars would be intrinsically hard to fool (tricking them into sudden braking maneuvers, say), because "they capture images from multiple scales, angles, perspectives, and the like.""
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Researchers demonstrate attack for pwning entire wind-farms / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "Worse: turbines are networked, so once one turbine is compromised, the rest of the turbines in the field can be poisoned, with attacks that include "paralyzing turbines, suddenly triggering their brakes to potentially damage them, and even relaying false feedback to their operators to prevent the sabotage from being detected.""
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Meet Dr. A.I.: Can an App Diagnose Your Health Issues? - 0 views

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    "The results may seem similar to what you'd get if you'd searched WebMD, Mayo Clinic, etc. The difference is that Dr. A.I. pulls in many more data points than those sites do, then combines artificial intelligence with a massive database to pinpoint the most likely results in your specific case. It doesn't just find all possible ailments and list them for you to explore further on your own."
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Japanese firms plan to launch self-driving cargo ships within decade | World news | The... - 0 views

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    "The ships would use the internet of things - connecting a range of devices over the internet - to gather data, such as weather conditions and shipping information, and plot the shortest, most efficient and safest routes.

    By removing the potential for human error, the companies believe the technology could dramatically cut the number of accidents at sea."
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JetBlue is the latest to use facial recognition technology in airports - 0 views

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    "However, there is some concern about how accurate these new procedures will be. Apparently the facial recognition technology doesn't recognize all people will the same accuracy. White women and black people aren't as easily recognized as white men, meaning there could be some mismatching of identities. Some are also concerned that this is crossing the line in terms of passenger privacy."
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Tim Berners-Lee calls for tighter regulation of online political advertising | Technolo... - 0 views

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    "The 61-year-old British computer scientist described how political advertising has become a sophisticated and targeted industry, drawing on enormous pools of personal data on Facebook and Google. This means that campaigns create precisely targeted ads for individuals - as many as 50,000 variations each day on Facebook during the 2016 US election, he said."
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