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Welsh police wrongly identify thousands as potential criminals | UK news | The Guardian - 0 views

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    "However, according to data on the force's website, 92% (2,297) of those were found to be "false positives".

    South Wales police admitted that "no facial recognition system is 100% accurate", but said the technology had led to more than 450 arrests since its introduction. It also said no one had been arrested after an incorrect match."
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'Being cash-free puts us at risk of attack': Swedes turn against cashlessness | World n... - 0 views

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    ""When you have a fully digital system you have no weapon to defend yourself if someone turns it off," he says.

    "If Putin invades Gotland [Sweden's largest island] it will be enough for him to turn off the payments system. No other country would even think about taking these sorts of risks, they would demand some sort of analogue system.""
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Software 'no more accurate than untrained humans' at judging reoffending risk | US news... - 0 views

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    "The algorithm, called Compas (Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions), is used throughout the US to weigh up whether defendants awaiting trial or sentencing are at too much risk of reoffending to be released on bail.

    Since being developed in 1998, the tool is reported to have been used to assess more than one million defendants. But a new paper has cast doubt on whether the software's predictions are sufficiently accurate to justify its use in potentially life-changing decisions."
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How white engineers built racist code - and why it's dangerous for black people | Techn... - 0 views

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    "The lack of answers the Jacksonville sheriff's office have provided in Lynch's case is representative of the problems that facial recognition poses across the country. "It's considered an imperfect biometric," said Garvie, who in 2016 created a study on facial recognition software, published by the Center on Privacy and Technology at Georgetown Law, called The Perpetual Line-Up. "There's no consensus in the scientific community that it provides a positive identification of somebody.""
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Computer says no: why making AIs fair, accountable and transparent is crucial | Science... - 0 views

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    "In October, American teachers prevailed in a lawsuit with their school district over a computer program that assessed their performance.

    The system rated teachers in Houston by comparing their students' test scores against state averages. Those with high ratings won praise and even bonuses. Those who fared poorly faced the sack.

    The program did not please everyone. Some teachers felt that the system marked them down without good reason. But they had no way of checking if the program was fair or faulty: the company that built the software, the SAS Institute, regards its algorithm a trade secret and would not disclose its workings."
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College installs facial recognition to make sure students don't get friends to sign in ... - 0 views

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    "The facial recognition system is currently being rolled out across six of Prof Shen's classes.

    "The new system saves time and reduces the workload of students," Prof Shen told the Beijing News. "Out of one hundred students, it usually only fails to recognise one student."

    But obviously, not everyone is a fan."
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Harvard Study Proves Apple Slows Down old iPhones to Sell Millions of New Models - Anon... - 0 views

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    "People have made the anecdotal observation that their Apple products become much slower right before the release of a new model.

    Now, a Harvard University study has done what any person with Google Trends could do, and pointed out that Google searches for "iPhone slow" spiked multiple times, just before the release of a new iPhone each time."
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Techniques for reliably fooling AI machine-vision classifiers / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "The Open AI researchers were intrigued by a claim that self-driving cars would be intrinsically hard to fool (tricking them into sudden braking maneuvers, say), because "they capture images from multiple scales, angles, perspectives, and the like.""
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Researchers demonstrate attack for pwning entire wind-farms / Boing Boing - 0 views

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    "Worse: turbines are networked, so once one turbine is compromised, the rest of the turbines in the field can be poisoned, with attacks that include "paralyzing turbines, suddenly triggering their brakes to potentially damage them, and even relaying false feedback to their operators to prevent the sabotage from being detected.""
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Meet Dr. A.I.: Can an App Diagnose Your Health Issues? - 0 views

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    "The results may seem similar to what you'd get if you'd searched WebMD, Mayo Clinic, etc. The difference is that Dr. A.I. pulls in many more data points than those sites do, then combines artificial intelligence with a massive database to pinpoint the most likely results in your specific case. It doesn't just find all possible ailments and list them for you to explore further on your own."
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Japanese firms plan to launch self-driving cargo ships within decade | World news | The... - 0 views

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    "The ships would use the internet of things - connecting a range of devices over the internet - to gather data, such as weather conditions and shipping information, and plot the shortest, most efficient and safest routes.

    By removing the potential for human error, the companies believe the technology could dramatically cut the number of accidents at sea."
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JetBlue is the latest to use facial recognition technology in airports - 0 views

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    "However, there is some concern about how accurate these new procedures will be. Apparently the facial recognition technology doesn't recognize all people will the same accuracy. White women and black people aren't as easily recognized as white men, meaning there could be some mismatching of identities. Some are also concerned that this is crossing the line in terms of passenger privacy."
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Tim Berners-Lee calls for tighter regulation of online political advertising | Technolo... - 0 views

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    "The 61-year-old British computer scientist described how political advertising has become a sophisticated and targeted industry, drawing on enormous pools of personal data on Facebook and Google. This means that campaigns create precisely targeted ads for individuals - as many as 50,000 variations each day on Facebook during the 2016 US election, he said."
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When Bad Code Caused Disaster: 10 Worst Programming Mistakes in History - 0 views

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    "Plus, programming can teach valuable life lessons. However, in its storied past, coding wrought destruction as well. Instances of a little bit of bad code caused disaster on a major level. The following are 10 of the worst programming mistakes in history."
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Robot monitors in homes of elderly people can predict falls, says study | Technology | ... - 0 views

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    "The study found that when a person's gait-speed dropped by 5cm/second within a week, this was a sign that they were at increased risk of a fall - in fact, 86% had a fall within three weeks when such a drop in walking speed was observed. By contrast, the elderly residents who had no change in walking speed had a background probability of falling of 19.5%."
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Driverless trucks: economic tsunami may swallow one of most common US jobs | Technology... - 0 views

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    "It seems highly likely that competition between the various companies developing these technologies will produce practical, self-driving trucks within the next five to 10 years. And once the technology is proven, the incentive to adopt it will be powerful: in the US alone, large trucks are involved in about 350,000 crashes a year, resulting in nearly 4,000 fatalities. Virtually all of these incidents can be traced to human error. The potential savings in lives, property damage and exposure to liability will eventually become irresistible.

    There's only one problem: truck driving is one of the most common occupations in the US. "
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Talking to a Computer May Soon Be Enough to Diagnose Illness - 0 views

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    "Participants used an app on their phones to record 30-second intervals of themselves reading a piece of text, describing a positive experience, then describing a negative experience. Doctors also took recordings from a control group of 25 patients who were either healthy or getting non-heart-related tests.

    The doctors found 13 different voice characteristics associated with coronary artery disease. Most notably, the biggest differences between heart patients and non-heart patients' voices occurred when they talked about a negative experience."
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