Skip to main content

Home/ ARIN6902 Internet Cultures and Governance/ Group items tagged iran

Rss Feed Group items tagged

Javier Velandia

Pakistan Blocks YouTube Facebook: Muslim Nation Cracks Down on "Sacrilegious" Content - 0 views

  •  
    Since May 20, some Muslim Nations ban Facebook and You Tube after the publication of groups and videos like "Everybody Draw Mohammed Day!" a Facebook group that encourages users to post images of Islam's Prophet Muhammad.
Eliza Hansell

Iranian computer game makes reformist Mousavi a target - 0 views

  •  
    An interesting article that surrounds the current political unrest in Iran as the anniversary of the 2009 'election' comes around. It's interesting to see how a computer game can be used in political games...
Allison Jones

Iran protest - fire festival - 0 views

  •  
    Back in March, Iranian's took part in the traditional fire festival, held at night time.

    A trend I've noticed with reporting in mainstream news is the use of a live blog with bloggers taking shifts to report on big events - The Guardian recently did this with the UK election and may do it for the World Cup coming up.

    To see this level of detail in live reporting in a mainstream news source is great, especially when it's not related to something as boring as sport ;)

    The reporter has contacts on the ground and also encourages other Iranians who may be reading to send him secure emails with updates from the event. Videos posted on YouTube are also linked to as soon as they're made available.
Javier Velandia

Bombard Iran ... with broadband - 0 views

  •  
    This article argues that the best alternative to fight against the Iranian Government, is providing the country with free satellite internet access. The flow of information and the use of Internet like a democratic tool will allow the own citizens to defeat the regime
Javier Velandia

Worldwide web goes truly global with Arabic urls - 0 views

  •  
    Following on from ICANN's approval 6 months ago to start using non-Latin scripts for domain names, Egypst has introduced .misr (the Arabic name for Egypt). Depending on the browser and language packs installed, if a user mouses over a .misr link on a web page, they may see this in Arabic script.

    Will be interesting to see how this and forthcoming addtional non-Latin domain names impact on the language barrier aspect of the digital divide.

    Saudi Arabia and UAE have also set up their own new domain names - ".Al-Saudiah" and ".Emarat".
  •  
    Six Months after the ICANN, approved the use of non-Latin domain names, Egypt launched "Misr" domain (the Arabic name for Egypt). A new perspective of Internet in the Arabic world.
César Albarrán Torres

Women and boobs take on Iran cleric | Technology | BigPond News - 0 views

  • Breasts were big on Facebook on Monday as a female blogger called on women to prove wrong an Iranian cleric who preached that cleavage causes earthquakes.
  • McCreight, who lives in the US state of Indiana, used the world's leading social network and microblogging service Twitter to enlist women worldwide to test the cleric's assertion that sexy women can make the ground shake.
Javier Velandia

Iran: State Reaps Real Dividends of Double-edged Persecution - 0 views

  •  
    A document that explores the difficulties of Iranian Cyber Activist to fight against the regime. Explain how Web Pages, Blogs and other internet initiatives like Radio Zamaneh, Jaras and Kalameh have been victims of persecution, filtering, and jail.
Javier Velandia

Interview: Helping Iranians Beat Internet Censorship - 1 views

  •  
    Austin Heap, Director of the San Francisco Based Censorship Research Center, explained the development of "HAYSTACK" a software that has been distributed to Iranians since last March to beat internet censorship.

    "we can through technology allow people to have their basic human right of free speech without fear of retaliation." Austin Heap.
Eliza Hansell

Iran blocks news website: French broadcaster - 0 views

  •  
    The Iranian government has allegedly blocked a popular French broadcaster website because of its reliance on social networking sites and other amateur techniques of online journalism.
Allison Jones

How the internet is being used for oppression rather than freedom - 0 views

  •  
    "Don't believe the hype", should be the sub title for this article...let's get real people!

    Questions whether the internet is a tool for freedom or whether it is just an instrument enabling further oppression in certain countries.

    Features quotes and examples from academic and former "cyber-utopian" Evgeny Morozov.

    The comments section of the article also provides more insight.
Eliza Hansell

MediaGuardian Innovation Awards: Austin Heap v Iran's censors - 0 views

  •  
    This article discusses Austin Heap, a US citizen being awarded for his innovative program Haystack, which sidesteps Iran's heavy internet filtering through servers located elsewhere in the world. This article is important in today's internet censorship debate, as it promotes the awarding of individual's who openly seek ways around censorship.
Sandra Rivera

Google Searches for a Foreign Policy - NYTimes.com - 2 views

  •  
    Google in the articulation of a 'foreign policy'??? Could Internet companies develop these kinds of policies?? 
  •  
    Google's position about internet filtering on China reveals the need for internet companies to develop their own foreign policies. Clay Shirky is interviewed on the topic and he shares his view about how the social effects of internet and how different are the mentalities behind microsoft and google
Eliza Hansell

Iran arrests 30 for involvement in US-led 'cyber war' - 2 views

  •  
    This is the Iranian government's answer to US anti-internet censorship groups who aim to undermine the regime's strict filtering rules through funding from the CIA. It brings up questions of international involvement in extreme national governance of the internet.
Amanda Lansdowne

Austin Heap: how I helped Iran's citizens to beat the censor | Technology | The Observer - 0 views

  •  
    An interesting interview with Austin Heap, a programmer from California who created 'Haystack', software that allows people to avoid the internet censorship imposed by governments.

    This software was created as a reaction to the increased censorship imposed by the Iranian Government during and after the elections. It allowed Iranians to skype, email and surf the net in relative safety.

    Other points of discussion include the apparent values of free speech embedded in the software, the relationship between Google and China, and Australia's proposal of censorship.
Katharina Otulak

Nobel laureate accuses European companies Siemens and Nokia to help Iran regime - 0 views

  •  
    Nobel prizewinner Shirin Ebadi accused German engineering giant Siemens and Finnish telecoms firm Nokia of supplying Iran with technology to help it suppress democratic dissent.

    The European Parliament also supports that arguement and strongly criticised international companies, in particular Nokia Siemens for giving Iranian authorities the tools needed for censorship and surveillance.

    Both companies argue that they could not be blamed for the misuse but that their technologies "play a significant role in the development of societies and the advancement of democracy"
David Sams

Iran Disrupts Internet Service Ahead of Protests - NYTimes.com - 0 views

  •  
    In an effort to disrupt communications and head off huge opposition demonstrations planned for Thursday, the Iranian authorities on Wednesday drastically slowed Internet service in Iran and shut down text messaging services, and an official said that Gmail, the Google e-mail service, would be blocked.
Rachael Bolton

Al Jazeera offers reality check for the Twitterverse - 1 views

  •  
    The head of new media for Middle East broadcaster and news service Al Jazeera has poured cold water on the much-hyped role of Twitter as the technology that started grass-roots revolution in Iran.

    Despite the US government's moves to prevent scheduled maintenance of the site to enabled Iranians to "Tweet out" to the world about the election, it seems a torrent of on-the-ground Tweets simply doesn't add up.

    After analyzing information about the alleged Iranian-based Tweeters, just 6 accounts could be verified as actually being on the ground.
1 - 17 of 17
Showing 20 items per page