Skip to main content

Home/ History with Holman/ Group items matching "nobles" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
km21dcs

Feudal System - 1 views

  • prisoner of war, his life was saved by his nobility, and his ransom had practically to be raised by the "villains" of his domains.
    • Garth Holman
       
      So, Nobles would not be killed and the people below in the social class had to raise money to pay his ransom.  Sweet deal, if you are a noble. 
  • The Feudal System Right of Hunting
  • privileges dearest to and most valued by the nobles.
  • ...16 more annotations...
    • Garth Holman
       
      With the Right of Hunting: What would peasants not have access to in their diet? 
    • Gilmore Dashon
       
      Maybe meat
    • Austin David
       
      Meat
    • Dakota Houston
       
      Meat
    • Luke Jennings Sanders
       
      Meat
    • Tolga Cavusoglu
       
      meat
    • Maximilian Uhlir
       
      meat
    • Teren Landis
       
      Meat
    • Alexander Johnson
       
      Meat
  • Feudal System Right of Jurisdiction
  • which gave judicial power to the nobles and lords in cases arising in their domains, had no appeal save to the King himself.
  • The Feudal System Right of Safe Convoy
  • that it even applied itself to the lower orders, and its violation was considered the most odious crime.
  • The Feudal System Right of Wearing Spurs
  • privileges that of wearing spurs of silver or gold according to their rank of knighthood
  • Feudal System Rights of Knighthood
  • Knights had the right of receiving double rations when prisoners of war; the right of claiming a year's delay when a creditor wished to seize their land; and the right of never having to submit to torture after trial, unless they were condemned to death for the crime they had committed.
  • Feudal System Right of having seats of honour in churches and Monuments
  • Feudal System Right of Disinheritance
  • The nobles enjoyed also the right of disinheritance, that is to say, of claiming the goods of a person dying on their lands who had no direct heir
  • Feudal System Right of Shelter
  • The right of shelter, was the principal charge imposed upon the noble. When a great baron visited his lands, his tenants were not only obliged to give him and his followers shelter, but also provisions and food, the nature and quality of which were all arranged beforehand with the most extraordinary detail.
  • The Feudal System was sustained by the rights and privileges given to the Upper Classes and in most cases enacted by laws. Everything was a source of privilege for the nobles.
  • villains
    • km21dcs
       
      This is a type of Peasant. Meaning Peasants weren't allowed to hunt
Garth Holman

Untitled - 2 views

  • Warlike Games of the Nobles; the Tournament. So eager for war and adventure were the Nobles that times of peace seemed dull. Even hunting, of which they were very fond, was not exciting enough. So they had "tournaments." These were simply play-wars in which knights contended, either in single combat or in opposing troops.
  • Galleries were erected from which the ladies might view the combats and applaud their champions; and high nobles and even kings in splendid costume eagerly attended. The knights in their shining armor, with colored streamers fluttering from their lances, made a gallant picture.
  • One of them was "chivalry," which taught that every boy of noble birth should strive to be a true "knight" and every girl a "lady."
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • A true knight was a brave warrior who feared nothing, who was always ready to fight for the poor or the unfortunate, and who would never do a mean or underhand thing. To perform a gallant feat of arms, or to help any one in distress, he would gladly risk any danger and never ask for pay. A true knight must be a good Christian and serve the church. But most of all he was to select some noble lady for whose sake he would win renown and whose smile would be his highest reward.
  • chivalry marked out for each young noble what he was to learn. At about the age of seven his training began. Usually he was sent by his father to the castle of his lord or to that of some other famous knight. Here he became a "page." He waited constantly upon the lord and his wife, and by the ladies of the castle was taught courtly manners and perhaps how to play and sing. But when he grew strong enough for more active tasks, perhaps at fourteen or fifteen, he became a "squire." He now attended more especially upon the lord. He must care for his horses, keep his arms bright, and go with him on his campaigns. Meanwhile, under the direction of his lord, he practiced constantly in the use of arms, learning to ride, to wear the heavy armor, and to wield the lance. The older squires fought beside their lords in battle.
  • The giving of "knighthood" was an impressive ceremony. After bathing and arraying himself in the required costume of red, white, and black, the young man was required to watch for a whole night before the altar of a church in which his weapons and armor had been placed. In the morning he attended mass and then, in the presence of all his family, friends, and vassals, advanced to his lord and knelt. The lord drew his sword and with the flat of the blade smote the young man on the shoulder, saying as he did so, "In the name of God,’ St. Michael, and St. George, I dub thee knight. Be brave and loyal." Then the newly made knight arose joyfully, and leaping upon his horse showed his skill in riding and in the use of his sword and lance. The ceremony ended with a great feast.
Garth Holman

Feudal System - 11 views

  • Feudal SystemThe Feudal System was sustained by the rights and privileges given to the Upper Classes and in most cases enacted by laws. Everything was a source of privilege for the nobles. They had a thousand pretexts for establishing taxes on their vassals, who were generally considered "taxable and to be worked at will." Kings and councils waived the necessity of their studying, in order to be received as bachelors of universities. If a noble was made a prisoner of war, his life was saved by his nobility, and his ransom had practically to be raised by the "villains" of his domains.
  • The Feudal System Right of Hunting
  • The Feudal System Right of Jurisdiction
  • ...19 more annotations...
  • The Feudal System Right of Safe Convoy
  • The Feudal System Right of Wearing Spurs
  • The Feudal System Rights of Knighthood
  • The Feudal System Right of having seats of honour in churches and Monuments
  • The Feudal System Right of Disinheritance
  • The Feudal System Right of common oven
  • Feudal System Rights of Treasure Trove
  • The Feudal System Right of Shipwrecks
  • The Feudal System Right of Shelter
    • Garth Holman
       
      What does the word Villains mean, as it is used here?  
  • all privileges dearest to and most valued by the nobles.
    • Garth Holman
       
      If you are not a noble, what would happen if you killed an animal on the nobles land? 
    • anonymous
       
      you would get punished
    • Garth Holman
       
      Who was the judge of in all cases on a manor? 
    • Olivia A
       
      The Lord
    • Garth Holman
       
      This right applied to what members of society? 
    • Olivia A
       
      All member of society
  • Knights had the right of receiving double rations when prisoners of war; the right of claiming a year's delay when a creditor wished to seize their land; and the right of never having to submit to torture after trial, unless they were condemned to death for the crime they had committed.
    • Garth Holman
       
      What are three rights a KNIGHT had? 
    • Sridhar U
       
      Reviving Double Rations when Prisoner of war. The right to not pay money for the land for a year. The right to have no tourture after a trail.
  • of claiming the goods of a person dying on their lands who had no direct heir. They also had the right of claiming a tax when a fief or domain changed hands.
  • the right of common oven required serfs to make use of the mill, the oven, of the lord
    • Garth Holman
       
      What did this force all peasant and serfs to do? 
  •  
    Laws and rights of the middle ages.
Garth Holman

Medieval Civilization: Lecture Notes - 2 views

  • Feudalism and Manorialism
  • The noble class developed a value system (later called chivalry)
  • Three-field system was used, with one field planted in the autumn, one in the spring, and one fallow.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • Power and prestige of the noble class based on land (the fief)
  • feudalism was a political arrangement that provided for the performance of these functions of government by a class of landed nobles.  nobles bound by an interdependent system of personal ties; the heart was the feudal contract, which established relations between lord and vassal, the most important of which were protection and service.
  • knights were to be Christian, brave, faithful, generous, and protective of women and the poor; evidence of this code may be found the French epic The Song of Roland and the Spanish El Cid.
  • which supported the lord, his family, and his soldiers.  Landed estate organized as manors; each a self-supporting economic unit; the lord provided the land and protection; serfs provided the labor.
  • Serfs (=landless peasants) bound to the soil; could not be bought or sold individually; they passed new owners when land changed hands.  Medieval farming methods primitive; yield was low
  •  
    Scroll about one-third of the way down, and you can find a great diagram of how the feudal system works. There is also a map of what a fief would look like. I highlighted where they have some information on feudalism and manorialism.
Garth Holman

Castles in Medieval Times - 0 views

  •      Large stone castles were built in Europe from about the 1100’s to about the 1500’s. These huge buildings served not only to defend the country from foreign invaders but as the basic tool in preserving the king’s and the nobles’ power over the land. The social system was very rigid in the Middle Ages.
  • Under Feudalism, the basic social structure in this time, all land was held by the king. The king gave pieces of this land to various high nobles, in return for their help in fighting his wars or in putting down rebellions. Not only did the higher nobles have to fight for the king themselves, they had to supply a certain number of lesser lords and other knights to help fight also. These higher nobles then gave some of their land to lesser knights, in return for their help in battle. Below all the knights were the serfs, who actually farmed the land. They gave a portion of their crops each year to the lord who ruled over them, in return for use of the land and protection.
  • castles as symbols of their power for all to see.
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • A man’s son inherited his lands and his obligations to fight
  • The castle was both a residence for the lord and his family, and a fortification. It was a strong place for the lord to defend himself against his enemies (and the king’s enemies, and his overlord’s enemies), a safe place for him and his knights to return to, and a place to live which emphasized his power.
  •   Castles were built to keep out enemies. When an attack was expected, the drawbridge was raised, the gates and portcullis were closed, and archers were stationed on the towers.
  • The walls were not only high, in a well-planned castle, but they were arranged as much as possible so that anyone climbing the walls could be shot at from two directions.
  • The castle’s defenses invited a great deal of ingenuity from the attackers. Rolling wooden towers, covered with thick hides to stop arrows and kept wet so they could not be set on fire, were brought up to the walls in an attack. Sometimes they even worked. Catapults threw heavy stones at the walls to make a breach or loads of rocks (or diseased livestock, or fire bombs) over the walls. The battering ram—generally used against a door—was an old favorite.
  • he knights and their servants and their mounts all had to eat, as did the lord, his family, and his servants and officials, and their families. Many castles grew certain types of food inside their walls, to add variety to the diet of those inside the castle, but it was not nearly enough to feed the people in the castle, much less their guests. Castles might have beehives, herb gardens, fruit trees or a fishpond. Because the land inside the castle walls was not enough to feed all these people, they got their food from the peasants who farmed outside, and from hunting. There were restrictions on hunting by the peasants, and sometimes it was forbidden entirely, so that the lord and his retainers would have plenty of game to hunt. Hunting was also a major recreation for the lord and his men.
Yuke Z

The Middle Ages for Kids - King John and the Magna Carta - 0 views

  • Without an army behind him, some pretender would soon steal his throne. The king was furious about it, but he signed the Magna Carta.
  • desert him
  • They could seize his castles if he did not keep his word. 
  • ...11 more annotations...
  • This made the archbishop furious. The archbishop called all the nobles together
  • He would promise anything to anybody, especially if there was money in it for him, but he soon broke his word.
  • King John was an English king. He was not a very pleasant person. He told lies.
  • discover that King John was breaking the law
  • King John promised he would do better.
  • he raised taxes again without consulting anyone.
  • they gathered a huge force of nobles at the town of Runnymede. They brought the king there.
  • parchment called the Magna Carta
  • if he did not sign, his nobles would
  • Most rights were already law.
  • The Magna Carta added new rights.
Cameron G.

Nobility - Knighthood - 2 views

  •  
    This site provides information regarding nobility, including Kings, Queens, Knights and other nobles.
Shira H

Noble Women in Middle Ages - 2 views

    • Shira H
       
      The education of noble women in the middle ages concentrated on the practical as opposed to academic
Garth Holman

Feudal Justice - 1 views

  • it was also a system of local justice.
  • right of jurisdiction gave judicial power to the nobles and lords in cases arising in their domains and had no appeal but the King himself.
  • Knights, barons, and dukes had their separate courts, and the king had his court above all.
  • ...6 more annotations...
  • Since most wrongs could be atoned for by the payment of a fine
    • Garth Holman
       
      Does this mean that Nobles used the "courts" as a way to make money? 
  • he court did not act in the public interest, as with us, but waited until the plaintiff requested service. Moreover, until the case had been decided, the accuser and the accused received the same treatment. Both were imprisoned; and the plaintiff who lost his case suffered the same penalty which the defendant, had he been found guilty, would have undergone.
  • not require the accuser to prove his case by calling witnesses and having them give testimony. The burden of proof lay on the accused, who had to clear himself of the charge,
  • Feudal Justice - The Ordeals
  • Ordeals, however, formed a method of appealing to God, the results of which could be immediately observed.
  • A form of trial which especially appealed to the warlike nobles was the judicial duel - a trial by combat. The accuser and the accused fought with each other; and the conqueror won the case. God, it was believed, would give victory to the innocent party, because he had right on his side.
  •  
    How did justice work in Feudal Europe?  Did they have Police? Courts? Rights? 
Garth Holman

Microsoft Word - Medieval People.doc.pdf - 1 views

  • Kings needed the good will and support of the Nobles and Knights so they granted them lands in return for their military services. The Nobles and Knights would in turn grant some of their lands to Freemen. Life lived under the Medieval Feudal System demanded that everyone owed allegiance to the King and their immediate superior. Everyone was expected to pay for the land by providing the following services:
  • Medieval Castle was governed by the pyramid-shaped Feudal System. This was based on the belief that the land belonged to God - but that the Kings, who ruled by Divine Right, managed the land and used it as they wished.
  • land belonged to God
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • Divine Right,
  • ope, as God's vicar on Earth, had the right to intervene and impose sanctions on an unjust King.
  • Feudalism pyramid the King was answerable to the Pope.
  • a King, depose a King, forfeit his Kingdom, put another King in his place or excommunicate a King.
  • The King claimed ownership of the land
  • these nobles then pledged their loyalty by swearing to serve and protect the king
  • military men (the knights) who were called vassals
  • The land was worked by the peasants or serfs. They belonged to the land and could not leave without permission - the bottom of the Feudalism pyramid.
Garth Holman

Medieval education in Europe: Schools & Universities - 0 views

  • It is estimated that by 1330, only 5% of the total population of Europe received any sort of education
  • Even then education, as we understand it, was not accessible or even desired by everyone. Schools were mostly only accessible to the sons of high lords of the land.
  • In most kingdoms in Europe, education was overseen by the church.
  • ...16 more annotations...
  • The very fact that the curriculum was structured by the church gave it the ability to mould the students to follow its doctrine
  • Unofficially, education started from a very young age. This sort of early education depended on the feudal class of the child’s parents
  • Even the children of serfs would be taught the skills needed to survive by their parents. The boys would be taken out into the fields to observe and to help their parents with easy tasks, while the girls would work with the animals at home, in the vegetable garden with their mothers, or watch them weave.
  • Children of craftsmen and merchants were educated from a very young age in the trade of their fathers. Trade secrets rarely left a family and they had to be taught and understood by all male (and unusually, female) heirs, in order to continue the family legacy.
  • Young boys of noble birth would learn how to hunt and swing a weapon, while the young ladies of nobility would learn how to cook
  • The main subject of study in those schools was Latin (reading and writing). In addition to this, students were also taught rhetoric – the art of public speaking and persuasion – which was a very useful tool for both men of the cloth and nobles alike.
  • Lessons frequently started at sunrise and finished at sunset
  • University education, across the whole of the continent, was a luxury to which only the wealthiest and brightest could ever aspire
  • Since the creation of the first university in 1088
  • Students attended the Medieval University at different ages, ranging from 14 (if they were attending Oxford or Paris to study the Arts) to their 30s (if they were studying Law in Bologna)
  • The dynamic between students and teachers in a medieval university was significantly different from today. In the University of Bologna students hired and fired teachers by consensus. The students also bargained as a collective regarding fees, and threatened teachers with strikes if their demands were not met
  • A Master of Arts degree in the medieval education system would have taken six years; a Bachelor of Arts degree would be awarded after completing the third or fourth year. By “Arts” the degree was referring to the seven liberal arts – arithmetic, geometry, astronomy, music theory, grammar, logic, and rhetoric
  • The sons of the peasants could only be educated if the lord of the manor had given his permission
  • Any family caught having a son educated without permission was heavily fined
  • Historians today believe that this policy was another way in which authority figures attempted to control the peasants, since an educated peasant/villein might prove to question the way things were done and upset the balance of power which kept the nobles strong.
  • Students held the legal status of clerics which, according to the Canon Law, could not be held by women; women were therefore not admitted into universities.
  •  
    This explains the importance of education and how each group got an education.
David W

Pope Urban II orders first Crusade - Nov 27, 1095 - HISTORY.com - 5 views

  • On November 27, 1095, Pope Urban II makes perhaps the most influential speech of the Middle Ages, giving rise to the Crusades by calling all Christians in Europe to war against Muslims in order to reclaim the Holy Land, with a cry of "Deus vult!" or "God wills it!"
  • By the end of the 11th century, the Holy Land—the area now commonly referred to as the Middle East—had become a point of conflict for European Christians. Since the 6th century, Christians frequently made pilgrimages to the birthplace of their religion, but when the Seljuk Turks took control of Jerusalem, Christians were barred from the Holy City. When the Turks then threatened to invade the Byzantine Empire and take Constantinople, Byzantine Emperor Alexius I made a special appeal to Urban for help. This was not the first appeal of its kind, but it came at an important time for Urban. Wanting to reinforce the power of the papacy, Urban seized the opportunity to unite Christian Europe under him as he fought to take back the Holy Land from the Turks.
  • Urban delivered a rousing speech summoning rich and poor alike to stop their in-fighting and embark on a righteous war to help their fellow Christians in the East and take back Jerusalem. Urban denigrated the Muslims, exaggerating stories of their anti-Christian acts, and promised absolution and remission of sins for all who died in the service of Christ.
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • European nobles were tempted by the prospect of increased land holdings and riches to be gained from the conquest. These nobles were responsible for the death of a great many innocents both on the way to and in the Holy Land, absorbing the riches and estates of those they conveniently deemed opponents to their cause. Adding to the death toll was the inexperience and lack of discipline of the Christian peasants against the trained, professional armies of the Muslims. As a result, the Christians were initially beaten back, and only through sheer force of numbers were they eventually able to triumph
    • Garth Holman
       
      God Wills it  -- this was the call.  All who went on Crusade were to paint a RED cross on their shirt to show they were on a mission for GOD. 
    • Garth Holman
       
       So Jews, Christians and Muslims all "share" the holy land.  But the Muslim Turks closed the pilgrimage route and said they were going to attack their neighbors, so Byzantine Emperor asks for help and Pope URBAN II sees a way to gain more power.  And The crusades begin. 
    • Garth Holman
       
      Urban asks rich (Kings/Nobles) and poor (peasants) alike to travel and free the holy land. He did not tell the whole truth, but added a little to make it sound worse.  Then he promised "A FREE PASS TO HEAVEN" for all who go and destroy Muslims.  The words Absolution (forgiveness) and Remission (take away) all sins=your free pass. 
    • Garth Holman
       
      People did not just go to "Serve G-D" but to gain wealth and power.  Christians only win one time and then lose the next six Crusades, but the impact of these events changed history forever. 
    • Nicole G
       
      Pope Urban II died in 1099 that was two weeks after the fall of Jerusalem and The Christians won and made it back to the Europe. 
    • parker g
       
      Truuuu
    • Garth Holman
       
      This is the key phrase: promised absolution and remission of sins for all who died in the service of Christ.  What does this mean? 
    • Kanrry K
       
      It means that your sins will be forgiven.
    • David W
       
      This is the beginning of all wars.
Shira H

The First Crusade - 1 views

    • Shira H
       
      has information for quest 8 and has a lot of information on the 1st and 3rd crusade. 
  • waiting for the main body of nobles, which was to assemble at Constantinople in the summer of 1096  a horde of poor men, women, and children set out, unorganized and almost unarmed, on the road to the Holy Land.
  • Without waiting for the main body of nobles, which was to assemble at Constantinople in the summer of 1096  a horde of poor men, women, and children set out, unorganized and almost unarmed, on the road to the Holy Land.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • This was called the Peoples Crusade, it is also referred to as the Peasants Crusade. Dividing command of the mixed multitudes with a poor knight, called Walter the Penniless, and followed by a throng of about 80,000 persons, among whom were many women and children, Peter the Hermit set out for Constantinople leading the Peoples Crusade
  • The Peoples Crusade was badly organised - most of the people were unarmed and lacked the command and discipline of the military crusaders. The Byzantium emperor Alexius I sent his ragged allies as quickly as possible to Asia Minor, where most of them were slaughtered by the Turks.
  • Peoples Crusade were slaughtered. Peter the Hermit did survive and eventually led the Crusaders in a procession around the walls of Jerusalem just before the city was taken.
  • a book about her father and the crusaders called the Alexiad which provides historical details about the first crusaders
  • The daughter of Alexius, called Anna Comnena wrote
  • Those crusaders who crossed the Bosphorus were surprised by the Turks
  • Peoples Crusade fell in battle with the natives of the countries through which they marched, and thousands more perished miserably of hunger and exposure.
Garth Holman

Feudalism at mrdowling.com - 0 views

  • Feudalism was the system of loyalties and protections during the Middle Ages. As the Roman Empire crumbled, emperors granted land to nobles in exchange for their loyalty. These lands eventually developed into manors. A manor is the land owned by a noble and everything on it. A typical manor consisted of a castle, a small village, and farmland
  • During the Middle Ages, peasants could no longer count on the Roman army to protect them. German, Viking and Magyar tribes overran homes and farms throughout Europe. The peasants turned to the landowners, often called lords, to protect them. Some peasants remained free, but many became serfs. A serf was bound to the land. He could not leave without buying his freedom, an unlikely occurrence in the Middle Ages. Life for a serf was not much better than the life of a slave. The only difference was that a serf could not be sold to another manor.
Maya G

Medieval Manors - 2 views

  • Medieval manors varied in size but were typically small holdings of between 1200 - 1800 acres. Every noble had at least one manor; great nobles might have several manors, usually scattered throughout the country;
  • A substantial number of manors (estimated by value at 17% in England in 1086) belonged directly to the king. An even greater proportion (rather more than a quarter) were held by bishoprics and monasteries.
  • A manor was the district over which a lord had domain and could exercise certain rights and privileges in medieval England. A typical manor would include a Manor House which was built apart from the village where the peasants lived.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • Servant: Servants were house peasants who worked in the lord's manor house, doing the cooking, cleaning, laundering, and other household chores
  • Peasant or Villein - A peasant or villein was a low status tenant who worked as an agricultural worker or laborer. A peasant or villein usually cultivated 20-40 acres of land
Cameron G.

Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris, France - 1 views

  •  
    Notre Dame in France. French Knights, Nobles, and Royalty would make a pilgrimage to this Cathedral. 
Shira H

Daily Life in the Middle Ages - 5 views

    • Shira H
       
      great site for quest 4 blog There is daily life of a peasant, lord, noble, noblewoman, Knight.
  • Daily Life of a Knight in the Middle Ages
  • Daily Life of a Noblewoman in the Middle Ages
  • ...4 more annotations...
  • Daily Life of a Peasant in the Middle Ages
  • Daily Life for Peasant Women in the Middle Ages
  • Daily Life in the Middle Ages - the Entertainment, Festivals and Holidays
  • ights and privileges given to the Upper Classes and in most cases enacted by laws. Everything was a source of privilege for the nobles.
Shira H

Middle Ages Food and Diet - 0 views

    • Shira H
       
      Great site for quest 4 includes what food nobles and peasants eat. For example peasants eat meat, fish home grown vegetables and herbs. nobles were allowed to hunt deer ,boar, hares and rabbits. 
Garth Holman

HISTORY OF FEUDALISM - 0 views

  •  
    "The top players in feudal Europe come from a small group of people - an aristocracy, based on skill in battle, with a shared commitment to a form of Christianity (at once power-hungry and idealistic) in which the pope in Rome has special powers as God's representative on earth. As a great feudal lord with moral pretensions, holding the ring between secular sovereigns, the pope can be seen as Europe's headmaster. Bishops and abbots are part of the small feudal aristocracy, for they are mostly recruited from the noble families holding the great fiefs. Indeed bishops can often be found on the battlefield, fighting it out with with the best. As in any other context, the strongest argument in feudalism - transcending the niceties of loyalty - is naked force. The Normans in England or in Sicily rule by right of conquest, and feudal disputes are regularly resolved in battle. But feudalism also provides many varieties of justification for force. And the possession of a good justification is almost as reassuring to a knight as a good suit of armour. One excellent excuse for warfare is the approval of the church. In 1059 the pope virtually commands the Normans to attack Sicily, by giving them feudal rights over territory not as yet theirs. Similarly Rome lets it be known that the Holy See is on the side of William when he invades England in 1066. Another important form of justification is a dynastic claim to a territory. Generations of marriages, carefully arranged for material gain, result in an immensely complex web of relationships - reflected often in kingdoms of very surprising shape on the map of Europe.
mrs. b.

Oligarchy - History for Kids! - 0 views

  • Oligarchy means the rule of the few, and those few are generally the people who are richer and more powerful than the others, what you might call the aristocrats or the nobles.
  • Usually the way it works is that there is a group of people who are in charge, somehow. Sometimes they may be elected, and sometimes they are born into their position, and at other times you might have to have a certain amount of money or land in order to be in the council. Then this group of people meets every so often - every week or every month - to decide important questions, and to appoint somebody to deal with things. Like they might decide that it should be illegal to steal, and then they would appoint one of the nobles to be a judge, and decide if people were guilty of stealing, and decide what to do with them if they were.
1 - 20 of 54 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page