Skip to main content

Home/ History with Holman/ Group items matching "Middleages" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Garth Holman

The Middle Ages | Feudalism - 1 views

    • John Woodbridge
       
      This shows that there were more than one type of monk or nun.
  • Working hard did not change your status. Your clothing, food, marriage, homes, etc., were determined for you. After the rank of king, the hierarchy was the nobles, the knights, the clergy (religious people), the tradesmen and the peasants.
  • You were born into a class of people and generally stayed in that class for your entire life.
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • profoundly affected by the rulings of the church.
  • One of the most unifying elements of the Middle Ages was the Roman Catholic Church.
  • In the Middle Ages, there was a definite structure in society.
  • Following the pope, in order of rank, there were bishops, priests, monks and nuns.
  • Bishops
  • Priests
  • Monks
  • were very holy and lived in a convent.
Angela W

The Middle Ages: Religion - 6 views

  •  
    This is a great website about religion in the Middle Ages and what people did. For more info click the Read More link.
Kalina P

Middle Ages Art and Architecture - 4 views

    • Kalina P
       
      This website has pretty much all you need to know for Quest 5 & 6. 
Alexander AER

Medieval Cult - 1 views

  •  
    Great website to learn about medieval cult. Contains some inappropriate content under "Law, Sex, and Christian Society in Medieval Europe".
Garth Holman

STORY PREFACE - Awesome Stories - 3 views

  • CAUTION: THIS STORY, AND ITS LINKS, CONTAIN GRUESOME REFERENCES OR IMAGES  
    • Garth Holman
       
      Again, As noted in the quest, you can skip this question. 
Swathi S

King Richard the Lionheart - 0 views

  • Richard on the Third Crusad
  • Richard on the Third Crusade
  • Richard's tactics ensured success at the siege of Acre and on the subsequent march south, Saladin's men being unable to harass the Crusader army into an impulsive action which might not have gone their way.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • the desertion of the French king had been a major blow, from which they could not hope to recover
  • Realising that he had no hope of holding Jerusalem even if he took it, Richard sadly ordered a retreat.
  • Richard I (September 8, 1157 – April 6, 1199) was King of England from 1189 to 1199. He was often referred to as Richard the Lionheart
  • sons of Henry II
  • Richard had limited respect for his father and lacked foresight and a sense of responsibility
  •  
    This is a really good site about King Richard the Lionhearted. It tells about his personal life and his attempts to seize Jerusalem.
Jenny L.

Saladin - 0 views

  • On his journey back to England, his ship got wrecked in a storm. He found that he had to travel through Austria.
  • Richard was betrayed to Leopold who held him captive for two years until a ransom was paid for him. Richard arrived home in 1194.
  •  
    King Richard
Garth Holman

Vikings: History and Legacy - 1 views

  • Northmenn or Normans is more correct way of calling them.
  • used in reference with the act of pirating.
  • "fara í viking" in English meant sailing off to far away shores to pillage.
Garth Holman

Feudalism Pyramid - 0 views

  • Feudalism - The Pyramid of PowerThe pyramid of power which was the Feudal system ran to a strict 'pecking' order - during the Medieval period of the Middle Ages everyone knew their place. The order of rank and precedence in the Medieval Feudal System was as follows:The PopeThe KingNoblesKnights / VassalsFreemenYeomenServantsPeasants / Serfs / Villeins
  • Feudalism PyramidFeudalism in the Middle Ages resembles a pyramid, with the lowest peasants at its base and the lines of authority flowing up to the peak of the structure, the king. Under Feudalism the King was only answerable to the Pope. Feudalism was based on the exchange of land for military service. Life lived under the Medieval Feudal System, or Feudalism, demanded that everyone owed allegiance to the King and their immediate superior.
  • Feudalism Pyramid - Fealty and HomageDuring the Middle Ages a portion of land called a fief would be granted by the King. This reward would be granted to him by his lord in exchange for his services. The recipient of the fief would be one of his vassals. The fief, or land, was usually granted following a Commendation Ceremony. The commendation ceremony was designed to create a lasting bond between a vassal and his lord. Fealty and homage were a key element of feudalism.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • Feudalism was based on the belief that the land belonged to God - but that the Kings, who ruled by Divine Right, managed the land and used it as they wished. However, under the Feudalism pyramid the King was answerable to the Pope. The Pope, as God's vicar on Earth, had the right to intervene and impose sanctions on an unjust King. Under the feudalism pyramid the Pope had the power to pronounce judgement against a King, depose a King, forfeit his Kingdom, put another King in his place or excommunicate a King.
  •  
    "Yeomen"
Garth Holman

Feudalism at mrdowling.com - 0 views

  • Feudalism was the system of loyalties and protections during the Middle Ages. As the Roman Empire crumbled, emperors granted land to nobles in exchange for their loyalty. These lands eventually developed into manors. A manor is the land owned by a noble and everything on it. A typical manor consisted of a castle, a small village, and farmland
  • During the Middle Ages, peasants could no longer count on the Roman army to protect them. German, Viking and Magyar tribes overran homes and farms throughout Europe. The peasants turned to the landowners, often called lords, to protect them. Some peasants remained free, but many became serfs. A serf was bound to the land. He could not leave without buying his freedom, an unlikely occurrence in the Middle Ages. Life for a serf was not much better than the life of a slave. The only difference was that a serf could not be sold to another manor.
Jack S

The Middle Ages: Feudal Life - 2 views

shared by Jack S on 20 Dec 11 - Cached
  • or safety and for defense, people in the Middle Ages formed small communities around a central lord or master. Most people lived on a manor, which consisted of the castle, the church, the village, and the surrounding farm land. These manors were isolated, with occasional visits from peddlers, pilgrims on their way to the Crusades, or soldiers from other fiefdoms.
  • n this "feudal" system, the king awarded land grants or "fiefs" to his most important nobles, his barons, and his bishops, in return for their contribution of soldiers for the king's armies. At the lowest echelon of society were the peasants, also called "serfs" or "villeins." In exchange for living and working on his land, known as the "demesne," the lord offered his peasants protection.
    • Jack S
       
      Property Takes a big role
    • josh j
       
      Religion takes a bigger role than property I think. :)
Cameron G.

The Middle Ages for Kids - Common People, the Manorial System - 1 views

  • If the manor land was sold or reassigned to a new owner, the serfs stayed with the land.
  • Serfs had many jobs on the manor including craftsmen, bakers, farmers, and tax collectors
  • They had to do the job they were assigned to do. 
  • ...15 more annotations...
  • Serfs could buy their freedom from the manor, but where would they get the money?
  • If a new lord took over the manor, he would need the serfs for labor.
  • Peasants were free to leave if they wished
  • Peasants worked the land and made the goods in exchange for protection.
  • Other than that, their life was just like a serf's life.
  • A few peasants escaped the hard work on the farm by joining the church. But most lived and died on the manor where they were born.
  • Everyone had to pay taxes to the lord
  • To pay the crop tax, some crops went to the lord, and some they kept. To pay the bread tax, some bread they made went to the lord, and some they kept. To pay the coat tax, some of the warm coats they made went to the lord, and some they kept.
  • Everything was paid in barter. Coinage or money did not exist on the manor. 
  • People believed that the only way to get to Heaven was to follow the teachings in the Bible.
  • The common people could not read or write.
  • The priest told them who they must marry and when. You had to do everything the priest said if you wanted to get to heaven. 
  • peasants and serfs were mostly content with their lot.
  • work kept everyone on the manor fed and comfortable, including themselves. 
  • They were not slaves. These people could not be bought and sold. But they could not leave the manor without permission.
Brandon M.

Middle ages link site - 1 views

  •  
    This has many sites but I highlighted some that seemed most important
Lauren M

The Middle Ages | Feudalism - 3 views

  • You were born into a class of people and generally stayed in that class for your entire life.
  • Working hard did not change your status. Your clothing, food, marriage, homes, etc., were determined for you.
  • Fancy clothes were a status symbol. Laws were passed that forbade peasants from wearing fancy clothes, which they couldn’t afford anyway.
  • ...10 more annotations...
  • Nobles ate rich and fancy food prepared by the servants.
  • About 20 percent of women and 5 percent of babies died during childbirth.
  • There were plenty of toys and games. Medieval children had dolls, spinning tops, rattles, hobby horses, blocks, balls, whistles and puppets. Little girls had glass jewelry for dress-up, while little boys played with wooden soldiers, whips, toy horses and wooden swords.
  • Women sewed, took care of children and ran the estate.
  • At age 7, boys were sent to another castle to begin learning to become a knight.
  • At age 7, girls were sent to another castle to learn to become a lady.
  • Marriages were never based on love. They were arranged by the parents and often involved land issues and strategic bonds.
  • Girls as young as age 12 were married to anyone who met the requirements of the girl’s parents. Grooms could be from 20 years to 50 years old.
  • Royal children learned a few manners, a little reading, writing and dancing.
  • Clothing
  •  
    Great Thanks!
Garth Holman

http://library.thinkquest.org/10949/fief/lofeudal.html - 8 views

  • They often formed their own manorial courts, called halimotes.
  • "Noone shall enter the fields to carry grain after sunset" This law was made to prevent grain from being stolen surreptitiously.
  • The lord also had a great deal of control over his peasants, known as serfs.
  • ...13 more annotations...
  • The people were bound to their land plots
  • The court was overseen by a representative of the lord, usually his steward.
  • They had grazing and field rights around their village.
  • They did not have right to hunt most wild game
  • . The average farmer was given a plot of land on which he could farm.
  • The kings held this land by what they believed was "divine right"
  • The barons were given a large portion of the king's land, known as fiefs or manors.
  • "shield money" was often used to maintain a somewhat regular army.
  • . The class of lords solidified into an upper nobility class.
  • Whenever a baron was granted or inherited a fief, he was made into a vassal of the king.
  • "homage and fealty"
  • During the period of history known as the Middle Ages, feudalism was the law of the land.
  • Projects by Students for Students
  •  
    An intermediate reading level description of the Middle Ages Feudal System.
  •  
    Huge list of Medieval Terminology and Glossary.  What is an Arrow Loop? Look here.  
Garth Holman

Free Video Clips - The Middle Ages - 0 views

  •  
    Lots of film clips on the middle ages 
Garth Holman

Medieval Peasant Cottage - YouTube - 2 views

  •  
    Great for Peasants to find out how their cottage/house was built
  •  
    How was a peasant cottage made? Check out this explanation in youtube for 3:18
Cameron G.

Guide to Life on a Medieval Manor - 0 views

  •  
    This has a great picture that visually explains a medieval manor and it's contents. It also gives some good information. Check it out! 
Alexander R.

http://library.thinkquest.org/10949/fief/hifeudal.html - 0 views

  •  
    This is a nice place to look at. It is great for all the classes.
1 - 20 of 132 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page