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Garth Holman

This dissident poet says elections and the nuclear pact give him hope for Iran | Public... - 0 views

  • The 44-year-old journalist and poet might have ended up dead, like some of his writer friends back home in Iran. Several of them were murdered in a series of political assassinations that began in the late 1990s.
  • freedom of expression, the Islamic Republic of Iran is among the worst of the worst. The country is ranked 169th, out of a total of 180 countries, on the 2016 World Press Freedom Index published by Reporters Without Borders.
  • Rafizadeh looks every bit the intellectual — glasses, leather jacket, cigarette. As a child, he would wake up early and recite Persian poetry out loud, annoying his father and his siblings. 
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  • “The [Iranian] government intrudes into your personal life no matter who you are. That’s why, after the murders started happening, I decided to write political poems,” he says. 
  • “Other intellectuals were killed, too,” he says. “The Iranian regime was murdering innocent people just because they dared to call for political change and reform.” 
  • afizadeh managed to shine a light on the killings with his writings in the pages of pro-reformist newspapers. But only for a time. Eventually, Rafizadeh was arrested.“I spent 86 days in a cell that was 1.5 meters by 2 meters,” Rafizadeh says. “And I was tortured.” 
  • Even after he was released, pending trial, he says authorities threatened to harm his children if he didn’t make public statements saying he was treated well in prison and that his past writings were false.
  • Rafizadeh says he did what he was being pressured to do. But he adds that, “the Iranian public knew who was lying and who was telling the truth.” “Other journalists besides me wrote about the human rights situation in Iran and we did have an impact,” Rafizadeh says. Nonetheless, he felt he had to leave the country after the courts sentenced him to 20 lashes and nine months in prison. He escaped into Turkey in 2005. Two years later, he got asylum in Canada. 
  • “But, as it happened, there is in Iran what you might call a ‘deep state.’” 
  • None of these political actors are entirely answerable to Iran’s elected government. That enabled the hardliners to launch a brutal crackdown against the pro-reform camp of then-president Mohammad Khatami and his supporters. The crackdown began in in the late '90s and continued into the early 2000s.
  • “You can fight for rights and freedoms in the political space all you like, but if there is not judicial protection of them, that is a fundamental problem,” she says. 
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    Dissident and actions in the modern world. 
Garth Holman

Spanish Inquisition Trials - How the Spanish Inquisition Worked | HowStuffWorks - 0 views

  • the inquisitions were tribunals -- a type of trial where the judge (or judges) tries the accused and passes judgment. But these trials were unique in several ways. The accused was required to testify, and he didn't get a lawyer or any assistance. If he refused to testify, the Inquisitor took this refusal as proof of his guilt. Anybody could testify against him, including relatives, criminals and other heretics, and he wasn't told who his accusers were. The accused usually didn't have any witnesses testify on his behalf, because they could also fall under suspicion of being a heretic. He also wasn't always immediately informed of the charges against him.
Garth Holman

The De Soto expedition - North Carolina Digital History - 0 views

  • De Soto’s expedition through the southeastern United States in 1539–43 was one of the earliest of the early contacts between Europeans and native peoples. Research on the expedition has contributed in no small way to the “quantum leap” in our understanding of the age. In a cluster of related projects that have drawn on an unusual cross-fertilization between historical and archaeological research, a group of scholars in the Southeast is attempting to plot the route that de Soto took, as a way of understanding the “social geography” of the native societies he met. The work on the de Soto expedition offers a revealing snapshot of the growing body of research on the earliest encounters between the civilizations of Europe and the Americas.
  • Hoping to find the riches that other Spanish explorers had discovered in Central and South America, de Soto landed in May 1539 near Tampa Bay, Fla., with about 600 men, a few hundred horses, packs of dogs, and a large herd of pigs. The army set out north and west through Florida.
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    de Soto Route in the southeast United States.  
Sami Z

The Truth About the Spanish Inquisition - 0 views

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    this is based on catholic perspective 
Mia K

Interesting Facts About the Spanish Inquisition | Doug Lawrence's Catholic Weblog - 0 views

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    This website is really good for straight to the point information about the spanish inquisition it basically summarizes up what we have been working on in class. 
aelepele a

Secrets of the Spanish Inquisition Revealed | Catholic Answers - 0 views

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    This was a really good website that gives you detailed back ground history on the spanish inquisition. 
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    Secrets Revealed
gpinhasi g

HowStuffWorks "How the Spanish Inquisition Worked" - 0 views

  • The Inquisition officially began with Pope Gregory XI (the Papal Inquisition). In 1231, he issued a bull, or decree, that set up a tribunal court system to try heretics and punish them.
  • The Spanish Inquisition was unique in that it was established by secular rulers, King Ferdinand II and Queen Isabella, with the approval of Pope Sixtus IV.
Kyle W

The Inquisition - 0 views

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    Another website on the Spanish Inquisition.
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    This source is very descriptive and it is a good source about the inquisition. 
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    Inquisition 
jyslain

HowStuffWorks "How the Spanish Inquisition Worked" - 0 views

    • cglosser c
       
      Priests tortured people who refused to admit that they were heretics.
  • The Spanish Inquisition was just one of several inquisitions that occurred between the 12th and 19th centuries
    • cglosser c
       
      This proves that the Spanish Inquisition didn't just last for just months, for hundreds of years!
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  • Circa 1500, A prisoner undergoing torture at the hands of the Spanish Inquisition. Monks in the background wait for his confession with quill and paper.
  • The term "inquisition" has a third meaning also -- the trials themselves
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    How the spanish inquisition worked.
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    Have you ever heard someone say "Nobody expects the Spanish Inquisition"? The line comes from a series of sketches by British comedy troupe Monty Py­thon. In the sketches, one character gets annoyed at another character for asking him question after question. At the height of his frustration, he yells, "Well, I wasn't expecting the Spanish Inquisition!"
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    This a website I found on how the Spanish Inquisition works.
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    Inquisition 
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    info on the spanish inquisition
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    This is an how stuff works web article explaining the Spanish Inquisition.  For those who are reading this article, you will see lots of ads. Do not let those distract you.
jyslain

Spanish Inquisition: 1478-1834 - 1 views

  • The Spanish Inquisition was used for both political and religious reasons. Spain is a nation-state that was born out of religious struggle between numerous different belief systems including Catholicism, Islam, Protestantism and Judaism.
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    A website on the Spanish Inquisition.
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    A website describing the spanish inquisition.
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    This is a great source for more detail on the inquisition. 
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    This describes why the inquisition was started and how it had an effect
bridget l

Dgh - Spanish Inquisition - 0 views

  • Records show about 2,000 people were sentenced to die in Spain alone and over the course of the inquisition thousands were killed. Many things caused the Inquisition, and there were many lasting effects.
    • bridget l
       
      These lasting effects stated here was that now in Spain 97% of the population is now catholic which conveys how the Spanish Inquisition is close to becoming all-catholic however, many perished to come to this state.
  • This made Spain a predominantly Catholic society,which changed many aspects of their country and impacted the life in Spanish colonies in the new world.
    • bridget l
       
      The Spanish Inquisition was also brought towards the lands Spain colonized spreading Catholicism and dominating over other religions.
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    The website I used for the May 2 DA.
cglosser c

Spanish Inquisition - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 1 views

  • The Tribunal of the Holy Office of the Inquisition (Spanish: Tribunal del Santo Oficio de la Inquisición), commonly known as the Spanish Inquisition (Inquisición española), was established in 1478 by Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand II of Aragon and Isabella I of Castile.
    • cglosser c
       
      These rulers hired people from the church to kill of those accused of heretics.
    • cglosser c
       
      These are events that made the Spanish Inquisition possible.
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  • The Inquisition was extremely active between 1480 and 1530. Different sources give different estimates of the number of trials and executions in this period; Henry Kamen estimates about 2,000 executed, based on the documentation of the autos-da-fé, the great majority being conversos of Jewish origin. He offers striking statistics: 91.6% of those judged in Valencia between 1484 and 1530 and 99.3% of those judged in Barcelona between 1484 and 1505 were of Jewish origin.[12] "In 1498 the pope was still trying to...gain acceptance for his own attitude towards the New Christians, which was generally more moderate than that of the Inquisition and the local rulers."
  • Alonso de Hojeda, a Dominican friar from Seville, convinced Queen Isabella of the existence of Crypto-Judaism among Andalusian conversos during her stay in Seville between 1477 and 1478.[7] A report, produced by Pedro González de Mendoza, Archbishop of Seville, and by the Segovian Dominican Tomás de Torquemada, corroborated this assertion
    • cglosser c
       
      The churches all over Europe Started killing people
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    This is about the Spanish Inquisition. What it is, and who was involved in it. 
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    The King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella Killed many of heretics. Heretics had to make a choices. 
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    This is a website that I found on the Spanish Inquisition.
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    Info on the spanish inquisition
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    This is a Wikipedia article on the Spanish Inquisition.
mukul g

Dgh - Spanish Inquisition - 1 views

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    This website gives us some details of the spanish Inquisition. 
Garth Holman

BURNING AT THE STAKE - Awesome Stories - 1 views

    • Garth Holman
       
      Do you believe Thomas Hobbes ideas?  Are we really what he says? 
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