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Garth Holman

History: Middle Ages Monasteries for Kids - 6 views

  • A monastery was a building, or buildings, where people lived and worshiped, devoting their time and life to God.
  • The people who lived in the monastery were called monks. The monastery was self contained, meaning everything the monks needed was provided by the monastery community. They made their own clothes and grew their own food. They had no need for the outside world. This way they could be somewhat isolated and could focus on God. There were monasteries spread throughout Europe during the Middle Ages.
  • only people in the Middle Ages who knew how to read and write. They provided education to the rest of the world.
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  • place where travelers could stay during
  • helped to feed the poor, take care of the sick, and provided education to boys in the local community.
  • day in the Middle Ages was spent praying, worshiping in church, reading the Bible, and meditating.
  • different jobs depending on their talents and interests.
  • Abbot - The Abbot was the head of the monastery or abbey.
  • A part of this vow was that they were dedicating their life to the monastery and the order of monks they were entering.
  • They were to give up worldly goods and devote their lives to God and discipline. They also took vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience.
  • Monks and nuns were generally the most educated people during the Middle Ages. They spent much of their day in silence.
  • A scribe may spend over a year copying a long book like the Bible.
Garth Holman

St. John Lateran - VR Tours - 1 views

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    First Catholic Cathedral, given to POPE from Roman Emperor. If you take this tour, compare it to the Middle ages cathedrals we will be studying. NOTE the major differences: Not Gothic.
nshore n

An Introduction to the Protestant Reformation | The Protestant Reformation | Khan Academy - 1 views

  • The sale of indulgences was a practice where the church acknowledged a donation or other charitable work with a piece of paper (an indulgence), that certified that your soul would enter heaven more quickly by reducing your time in purgatory.
  • Luther sparked the Reformation in 1517 by posting, at least according to tradition, his "95 Theses" on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg, Germany - these theses were a list of statements that expressed Luther's concerns about certain Church practices - largely the sale of indulgences, but they were based on Luther's deeper concerns with Church doctrine.
  • but none of these efforts successfully challenged Church practice until Martin Luther's actions in the early 1500s.
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  • Pope Leo X had granted indulgences to raise money for the rebuilding of St. Peter's Basilica in Rome. These indulgences were being sold by Johann Tetzel not far from Wittenberg, where Luther was Professor of Theology.
  • He concluded that no matter how "good" he tried to be, no matter how he tried to stay away from sin, he still found himself having sinful thoughts. He was fearful that no matter how many good works he did, he could never do enough to earn his place in heaven
  • The Reformation was a very violent period in Europe, even family members were often pitted against one another in the wars of religion. Each side, both Catholics and Protestants, were often absolutely certain that they were in the right and that the other side was doing the devil's work.
  • It is also during this period that the Scientific Revolution gained momentum and observation of the natural world replaced religious doctrine as the source of our understanding of the universe and our place in it.
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    Very Good Understanding of the Reformation and Indulgences, without going into too much detail. 
Lily S

The Medieval Church - 0 views

  • very rich and powerful
  • organized like a government with laws
  • job of praying for everyone else.
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  • Monks were often teachers who taught noble children
  • Some even had the
  • The windows would tell bible stories and the lives of the saints
  • made of stone
  • provided spiritual guidance and a place were people could get an education
  • Almost all
  • Monks lived in monasteries or abbeys. They worked and prayed. Women could also serve a religious life as a nun
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    A good website on the Medieval Church
Garth Holman

HISTORY OF FEUDALISM - 0 views

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    "The top players in feudal Europe come from a small group of people - an aristocracy, based on skill in battle, with a shared commitment to a form of Christianity (at once power-hungry and idealistic) in which the pope in Rome has special powers as God's representative on earth. As a great feudal lord with moral pretensions, holding the ring between secular sovereigns, the pope can be seen as Europe's headmaster. Bishops and abbots are part of the small feudal aristocracy, for they are mostly recruited from the noble families holding the great fiefs. Indeed bishops can often be found on the battlefield, fighting it out with with the best. As in any other context, the strongest argument in feudalism - transcending the niceties of loyalty - is naked force. The Normans in England or in Sicily rule by right of conquest, and feudal disputes are regularly resolved in battle. But feudalism also provides many varieties of justification for force. And the possession of a good justification is almost as reassuring to a knight as a good suit of armour. One excellent excuse for warfare is the approval of the church. In 1059 the pope virtually commands the Normans to attack Sicily, by giving them feudal rights over territory not as yet theirs. Similarly Rome lets it be known that the Holy See is on the side of William when he invades England in 1066. Another important form of justification is a dynastic claim to a territory. Generations of marriages, carefully arranged for material gain, result in an immensely complex web of relationships - reflected often in kingdoms of very surprising shape on the map of Europe.
Garth Holman

Bishops in the Middle Ages | Middle Ages - 1 views

  • The Bishops being a key figure of the society and being wealthy by virtue of his position in the clergy used to live either in a castle or a manor
  • Every king was supposed to have one Bishop in his court for consultation.
  • The rulings of the clergy affected everyone during the Middle Ages.
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  • Bishops had become so powerful that it was mandatory for the king to take orders and consult the Bishop in everyday affairs over the state.
  • f you were born in one class of the society, you belonged to that class for your entire life with no chances of improving your status through hard work.
  • They were generally from a noble family or a wealthy family from some town.
  • He used to take tours around the country to many churches within the country. There was a seat reserved for the Bishop in every church in the country.
  • Listening to the plights of all the priests and clergymen below him; Levy taxes on the peasants; Settling of important issues such as annulment of marriage; Maintaining an army of his own to assist the king during war; Leading his army in the war was common in the Early Middle Ages for Bishops; Take care of the spiritual soundness of his diocese; Implement the code of the church in the diocese; Take care of the business of the church in their diocese and supervise the priests, nuns and monks in their activities.
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    tells about key ideas a being a bishop 
Katelyn H

Confession - 0 views

  • Most people, even non-Catholics, know what going to confession involves. One travels to a church, in a corner of which is situated a confessional booth.
  • "Bless me Father, for I have sinned. It has been three months since my last confession."
  • he priest listens to the confession and assigns an appropriate penance
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  • Public confession of sins was part of this (although private confession followed by public penance gained acceptance after the official conversion of Rome)
  • Penitents were required to kneel outside the church, wearing sackcloth and ashes, during Mass and were not allowed to participate in the Eucharist
  • For major, or "deadly" sins, the length of this penance could number in years, and one could only be absolved once of such a sin before one was excommunicated
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    This goes more into the confession process of the Middle Ages.
Garth Holman

The Medieval Church - 3 views

  • From the very earliest of ages, the people were taught that the only way they could get to Heaven was if the Roman Catholic Church let them. Everybody would have been terrified of Hell and the people would have been told of the sheer horrors awaiting for them in Hell in the weekly services they attended.
  • The control the Church had over the people was total. Peasants worked for free on Church land. This proved difficult for peasants as the time they spent working on Church land, could have been better spent working on their own plots of land producing food for their families.
  • They paid 10% of what they earned in a year to the Church (this tax was called tithes). Tithes could be paid in either money or in goods produced by the peasant farmers. As peasants had little money, they almost always had to pay in seeds, harvested grain, animals etc. This usually caused a peasant a lot of hardship as seeds, for example, would be needed to feed a family the following year.
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  • What the Church got in tithes was kept in huge tithe barns; a lot of the stored grain would have been eaten  by rats or poisoned by their urine.
  • A failure to pay tithes, so the peasants were told by the Church, would lead to their souls going to Hell after they had died. 
  • People were too scared not to pay tithes despite the difficulties it meant for them.
  • You also had to pay for baptisms (if you were not baptised you could not go to Heaven when you died), marriages (there were no couples living together in Medieval times as the Church taught that this equaled sin) and burials - you had to be buried on holy land if your soul was to get to heaven. Whichever way you looked, the Church received money.
  • The Church also did not have to pay taxes.
  • Important cities would have cathedrals in them.
  • To work on the building of a cathedral was a great honour. Those who did the skilled work had to belong to a guild. They would have used just the most basic of tools and less than strong scaffolding to do the ceilings. However, if you were killed in an accident while working in a cathedral or a church, you were guaranteed a place in Heaven - or so the workers were told.
  • Their sheer size meant that people would see them from miles around, and remind them of the huge power of the Catholic Church in Medieval England.
    • Shira H
       
      Great site for quest 5
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    Medieval Church
Aryeh C

Weird religious practices of the middle ages - 0 views

  • Puss-Drinking and Scab-Eating--The general populace scorned lepers for their appearance and disease. As an act of humility and caring, many female saints such as St. Catherine would care for these "untouchables" by licking away the puss in their wounds then eating the scabs. People considered these saints especially holy.
  • These men would take a ladder, climb up to the top of a ruined Roman column, sit down, and then kick away the ladder, vowing to remain there contemplating God until they died.
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    These are some of the most bizarre medieval religious practices.
Jenny L.

http://www.schoolhistory.co.uk/year7links/life/foulfood.pdf - 1 views

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    Explains about what people ate in the Middle ages
ca21dcs

Feudalism and Religion in the Middle Ages - 7 views

  • eudalism was the main political system in the Middle Ages.
  • The Church had the same amount, if not more, power and wealth than the kings.
  • All schools taught religion, most politicians were also priests, and no food was eaten without first saying thanks to God.
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  • priests had quite a lot of influence over the people.
  • Priests also collected a tenth of whatever the peasants had produced from their land over the course of the year. This was called a "tithe."
  • Anyone who was suspected of disagreeing with the church's teachings was called a heretic and burnt at the stake.
  • even if they did make it to heaven in the afterlife, they would have to spend a thousand years in purgatory to be cleansed of their sins on earth. So, many rich people would pay the church to say extra masses for them in the hope that it would reduce the amount of time in purgatory.
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    This site is very good for finding out important things about the middle ages.
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