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Garth Holman

The Assassination of Julius Caesar, 44 BC - 4 views

  • In January of 49 BC, Julius Caesar led his army across the Rubicon River in Northern Italy (see Caesar Crosses the Rubicon, 49 BC) and plunged the Roman Republic into civil war. Caesar's rival, Pompey, fled to Greece. Within three months Caesar controlled the entire Italian peninsula and in Spain had defeated the legions loyal to Pompey. Caesar now pursued Pompey to Greece. Although outnumbered, Caesar crushed the forces of his enemy but not before Pompey escaped to Egypt. Following Pompey to Egypt, Caesar was presented with his rival's severed head as a token of friendship. Before leaving the The Assassination of Caesar region, Caesar established Cleopatra as his surrogate ruler of Egypt. Caesar defeated his remaining rivals in North Africa in 47 BC and returned to Rome with his authority firmly established. Caesar continued to consolidate his power and in February 44 BC, he declared himself dictator for life. This act, along with his continual effort to adorn himself with the trappings of power, turned many in the Senate against him. Sixty members of the Senate concluded that the only resolution to the problem was to assassinate Caesar
  • The Plan: "The conspirators never met openly, but they assembled a few at a time in each others' homes. There were many discussions and proposals, as might be expected, while they investigated how and where to execute their design. Some suggested that they should make the attempt as he was going along the Sacred Way, which was one of his favorite walks. Another idea was for it to be done at the elections during which he bad to cross a bridge to appoint the magistrates in the Campus Martius; they should draw lots for some to push him from the bridge and for others to run up and kill him. A third plan was to wait for a coming gladiatorial show. The advantage of that would be that, because of the show, no suspicion would be aroused if arms were seen prepared for the attempt. But the majority opinion favored killing him while he sat in the Senate, where he would be by himself since non-Senators would not be admitted, and where the many conspirators could hide their daggers beneath their togas. This plan won the day."
  • "...his friends were alarmed at certain rumors and tried to stop him going to the Senate-house, as did his doctors, for he was suffering from one of his occasional dizzy spells. His wife, Calpurnia, especially, who was frightened by some visions in her dreams, clung to him and said that she would not let him go out that day. But Brutus, one of the conspirators who was then thought of as a firm friend, came up and said, 'What is this, Caesar? Are you a man to pay attention to a woman's dreams and the idle gossip of stupid men, and to insult the Senate by not going out, although it has honored you and has been specially summoned by you? But listen to me, cast aside the forebodings of all these people, and come. The Senate has been in session waiting for you since early this morning.' This swayed Caesar and he left."
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  • The Attack: "The Senate rose in respect for his position when they saw him entering. Those who were to have part in the plot stood near him. Right next to him went Tillius Cimber, whose brother had been exiled by Caesar. Under pretext of a humble request on behalf of this brother, Cimber approached and grasped the mantle of his toga, seeming to want to make a more positive move with his hands upon Caesar. Caesar wanted to get up and use his hands, but was prevented by Cimber and became exceedingly annoyed. That was the moment for the men to set to work. All quickly unsheathed their daggers and rushed at him. First Servilius Casca struck him with the point of the blade on the left shoulder a little above the collar-bone. He had been aiming for that, but in the excitement he missed. Caesar rose to defend himself, and in the uproar Casca shouted out in Greek to his brother. The latter heard him and drove his sword into the ribs. After a moment, Cassius made a slash at his face, and Decimus Brutus pierced him in the side. While Cassius Longinus was trying to give him another blow he missed and struck Marcus Brutus on the hand. Minucius also hit out at Caesar and hit Rubrius in the thigh. They were just like men doing battle against him. Under the mass of wounds, he fell at the foot of Pompey's statue. Everyone wanted to seem to have had some part in the murder, and there was not one of them who failed to strike his body as it lay there, until, wounded thirty-five times, he breathed his last. "
Rachel C

7th grade - History - 1 views

  • Find a place where it would look goodHave the camera on the groundHave the jumpers jump in syncTake a lot of pictures
  • Every time you're going to judge someone you've got to look at different perspectives because you might judge him differently if you look at it with other eyes. "
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    Hadoken with Moe
Zoe K

Ancient Greece - 0 views

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    Ancient Greece Facts and Information
Bridgitte F

Greek History - 0 views

  • According to archaeological and historical sources the story of Greece began deep in prehistory, and has continued to our days.
  • This brief history of Greece is compiled here as an introduction to web readers and to provide the historical background that’s needed to appreciate all the subjects of Ancient Greek civilization. It was no easy task to compress the history of Ancient Greece into a concise format that would be appropriate both for Online reading and as a precise overview of the subject.
  • From the 6th and until the 2nd century BCE the Agora as the heart of the government, as a public place of debate, as a place of worship, and as marketplace, played a central role in the development of the Athenian ideals, and provided a healthy environment where the unique Democratic political system took its first wobbly steps on earth.
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  • Delphi was inhabited since Mycenaean times (14th - 11th c. B.C.) by small settlements who were dedicated to the Mother Earth deity. The worship of Apollo as the god of light, harmony, and order was established between the 11th and 9th centuries. Slowly over the next five centuries the sanctuary grew in size and importance. During the 8th c. B.C. Delphi became internationally known for the Oracular powers of Pythia.
  • Dodona is an important ancient Greek oracle, second in fame only to Delphi. It is located in a strategic pass at the eastern slopes of the imposing Mt. Tomaros, close to the modern city of Ioannina in western Epiros. It was dedicated to Zeus and Dione, and the Greeks believed it to be the most ancient of oracles.
  • Archaeological evidence testifies to the island's habitation since the 7th millennium BC After the 5th millennium BC we find the first evidence of hand-made ceramic pottery which marks the beginning of the civilization Evans, the famed archaeologist who excavated Knossos, named "Minoan" after the legendary king Minos.
  • The sanctuary at Olympia (Ολυμπία) is positioned in a serene and fertile valley between the Alpheios and the Kladeos rivers in western Peloponnese, in Elis. It was the host of the Olympic games for a thousand years in antiquity.
Gail H

Greece Timeline - 0 views

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    Ancient Greece Timeline, really useful and summarized overview of Ancient Greece.
Jack M

Greece country profile - Overview - BBC News - 0 views

  • in its literature, art, philosophy and politics.
  • mainland with over 1,400 islands,
  • The global financial crisis of the late 2000s hit Greece particularly hard, as the legacy of high public spending and widespread tax evasion combined with the credit crunch and the resulting recession to leave the country with a crippling debt burden.
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  • Relations warmed after both countries suffered earthquakes in 1999 and offered each other practical help.
  • Athens stepped into the global spotlight when the Olympic Games returned home in 2004. The games were hailed as a success, despite widely publicised fears that the infrastructure would not be complete in time.
Viet N

Ancient Greece - Geography - The British Museum - 0 views

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    Describes Greece geography.
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    The geography of Ancient Greece.
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    Greek geography has many features
Zoe K

Ancient Greece - Ancient History - HISTORY.com - 2 views

  • Greece refers to the time three centuries before the classical age, between 800 B.C. and 500 B.C.
  • Archaic Greece saw advances in art, poetry and technology, but most of all it was the age in which the polis, or city-state, was invented.
  • They developed governments and organized their citizens according to some sort of constitution or set of laws.
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  • (For example, they refused to let ordinary people serve on councils or assemblies.
  • They all had economies that were based on agriculture, not trade
  • These people monopolized political power.
  • The colonial migrations of the Archaic period had an important effect on its art and literature
  • They also monopolized the best farmland, and some even claimed to be descended from the gods. Because “the poor with their wives and children were enslaved to the rich and had no political rights,”
  • Land was the most important source of wealth in the city-states;
  • As time passed and their populations grew, many of these agricultural city-states began to produce consumer goods such as pottery, cloth, wine and metalwork.
  • These leaders were known as tyrants.
  • And every one of these city-states (known as poleis) was said to be protected by a particular god or goddess, to whom the citizens of the polis owed a great deal of reverence, respect and sacrifice.
  • a relatively sophisticated period in world history.
  • The polis became the defining feature of Greek political life for hundreds of years.
  • During the so-called “Greek Dark Ages” before the Archaic period, people lived scattered throughout Greece in small farming villages. As they grew larger, these villages began to evolve. Some built walls.
  • Between 750 B.C. and 600 B.C., Greek colonies sprang up from the Mediterranean to Asia Minor, from North Africa to the coast of the Black Sea. By the end of the seventh century B.C., there were more than 1,500 colonial poleis.
  • Each of these poleis was an independent city-state. In this way, the colonies of the Archaic period were different from other colonies we are familiar with: The people who lived there were not ruled by or bound to the city-states from which they came. The new poleis were self-governing and self-sufficient.
    • Yang Y
       
      The oligarchs' power was greater than anyone else's.
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    facts about ancient greece
Garth Holman

World History Chapter 8 "Ancient Greece" 2000 - 500 BC Section 1 "Geography a... - 3 views

    • Garth Holman
       
      Note how far the Greek people traveled and created colonies.  How did they do this?  What did they need to do this? 
    • Garth Holman
       
      Democracy: What does it mean?  What is  Aristocrats?   What is a tyrant?   What is an Oligarchy? 
    • Garth Holman
       
      Who is Draco?  What did he do?  What do you think it means when we say today draconian Laws?  
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    • Garth Holman
       
      What was the Athenian Assembly?  Who were citizens of Athens?  
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    Greece and democracy
Somin J

Greek Government - Ancient History Encyclopedia - 0 views

  • fundamental questions as who should rule and how?
  • t is possible to piece together a more complete history,
  • Surviving, though, are over 150 political speeches and 20,000 inscriptions which include 500 decrees and 10 laws.
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  • (monarchies and tyrants) or in a select few (the oligarchies) or in every male citizen: democracy
  • birth of democracy (demokratia) from around 460 BCE
  • Any male citizen 18 years or over could speak (at least in theory) and vote in the assembly, usually with a simple show of hands.
  • Perhaps the most famous bad decision from the Athenian democracy was the death sentence given to the philosopher Socrates in 399 BCE.   
  • In other Greek states then, there were also democratic assemblies, sometimes, though, with a minimum property stipulation for attendees (as in the Boiotian federation 447-386 BCE). Some city-states also mixed democratic assemblies with a monarchy (for example, Macedonia and Molossia).
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    Description of Greek Democracy, Monarchy, Oligarchy and Public Officials
Garth Holman

Ancient Greek Environment - Ancient Greece for Kids! - 1 views

  • The combination of good sailing and lousy farming tends to make Greeks try to get a living from the sea.
    • Garth Holman
       
      How did these people make a living from the sea?  
  • There are several active volcanoes, and earthquakes are also very common. There is a nervous feeling that there could be a natural disaster at any time. This got the Greeks interested in a particular kind of religion which we call oracles. Oracles are the gods speaking to people, often in the form of minor earthquakes, and the gods tell the people what is going to happen in the future.
  • There used to be quite a lot of trees on the hillsides of Greece, but people cut most of them down, and now the hills of Greece are mostly bare, or have little bushes on them.
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  • The soil is not very good for growing things, there are a lot of mountains that make it hard to walk from one place to another, and there is never enough fresh water.
  • what Greece does have is a lot of coastline
  • No part of Greece is more than about forty miles from the sea: a couple of days walking
  • in Greece, they were sailors
  • Greeks have always spent a lot of time sailing on the ocean.
Yingying G

Alexander the Great | Megas Alexandros, Μέγας Αλέξανδρος, Alexander Iii Of Ma... - 1 views

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    Who was Alexander the great?
Garth Holman

SeventhGrade - 0 views

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    Educational Service Center website that lists Ohio History Standards with links to websites and activities that meet the Standards.
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