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Garth Holman

Microsoft Word - Medieval People.doc.pdf - 1 views

  • Kings needed the good will and support of the Nobles and Knights so they granted them lands in return for their military services. The Nobles and Knights would in turn grant some of their lands to Freemen. Life lived under the Medieval Feudal System demanded that everyone owed allegiance to the King and their immediate superior. Everyone was expected to pay for the land by providing the following services:
  • Medieval Castle was governed by the pyramid-shaped Feudal System. This was based on the belief that the land belonged to God - but that the Kings, who ruled by Divine Right, managed the land and used it as they wished.
  • land belonged to God
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  • Divine Right,
  • ope, as God's vicar on Earth, had the right to intervene and impose sanctions on an unjust King.
  • Feudalism pyramid the King was answerable to the Pope.
  • a King, depose a King, forfeit his Kingdom, put another King in his place or excommunicate a King.
  • The King claimed ownership of the land
  • these nobles then pledged their loyalty by swearing to serve and protect the king
  • military men (the knights) who were called vassals
  • The land was worked by the peasants or serfs. They belonged to the land and could not leave without permission - the bottom of the Feudalism pyramid.
Garth Holman

http://www.lscacamp.org/portals/0/medieval%20people.pdf - 1 views

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    Explains Titles and Feudalism
Garth Holman

Feudal Justice - 1 views

  • it was also a system of local justice.
  • right of jurisdiction gave judicial power to the nobles and lords in cases arising in their domains and had no appeal but the King himself.
  • Knights, barons, and dukes had their separate courts, and the king had his court above all.
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  • Since most wrongs could be atoned for by the payment of a fine
    • Garth Holman
       
      Does this mean that Nobles used the "courts" as a way to make money? 
  • he court did not act in the public interest, as with us, but waited until the plaintiff requested service. Moreover, until the case had been decided, the accuser and the accused received the same treatment. Both were imprisoned; and the plaintiff who lost his case suffered the same penalty which the defendant, had he been found guilty, would have undergone.
  • not require the accuser to prove his case by calling witnesses and having them give testimony. The burden of proof lay on the accused, who had to clear himself of the charge,
  • Feudal Justice - The Ordeals
  • Ordeals, however, formed a method of appealing to God, the results of which could be immediately observed.
  • A form of trial which especially appealed to the warlike nobles was the judicial duel - a trial by combat. The accuser and the accused fought with each other; and the conqueror won the case. God, it was believed, would give victory to the innocent party, because he had right on his side.
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    How did justice work in Feudal Europe?  Did they have Police? Courts? Rights? 
Garth Holman

Castles in Medieval Times - 0 views

  •      Large stone castles were built in Europe from about the 1100’s to about the 1500’s. These huge buildings served not only to defend the country from foreign invaders but as the basic tool in preserving the king’s and the nobles’ power over the land. The social system was very rigid in the Middle Ages.
  • Under Feudalism, the basic social structure in this time, all land was held by the king. The king gave pieces of this land to various high nobles, in return for their help in fighting his wars or in putting down rebellions. Not only did the higher nobles have to fight for the king themselves, they had to supply a certain number of lesser lords and other knights to help fight also. These higher nobles then gave some of their land to lesser knights, in return for their help in battle. Below all the knights were the serfs, who actually farmed the land. They gave a portion of their crops each year to the lord who ruled over them, in return for use of the land and protection.
  • castles as symbols of their power for all to see.
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  • A man’s son inherited his lands and his obligations to fight
  • The castle was both a residence for the lord and his family, and a fortification. It was a strong place for the lord to defend himself against his enemies (and the king’s enemies, and his overlord’s enemies), a safe place for him and his knights to return to, and a place to live which emphasized his power.
  •   Castles were built to keep out enemies. When an attack was expected, the drawbridge was raised, the gates and portcullis were closed, and archers were stationed on the towers.
  • The walls were not only high, in a well-planned castle, but they were arranged as much as possible so that anyone climbing the walls could be shot at from two directions.
  • The castle’s defenses invited a great deal of ingenuity from the attackers. Rolling wooden towers, covered with thick hides to stop arrows and kept wet so they could not be set on fire, were brought up to the walls in an attack. Sometimes they even worked. Catapults threw heavy stones at the walls to make a breach or loads of rocks (or diseased livestock, or fire bombs) over the walls. The battering ram—generally used against a door—was an old favorite.
  • he knights and their servants and their mounts all had to eat, as did the lord, his family, and his servants and officials, and their families. Many castles grew certain types of food inside their walls, to add variety to the diet of those inside the castle, but it was not nearly enough to feed the people in the castle, much less their guests. Castles might have beehives, herb gardens, fruit trees or a fishpond. Because the land inside the castle walls was not enough to feed all these people, they got their food from the peasants who farmed outside, and from hunting. There were restrictions on hunting by the peasants, and sometimes it was forbidden entirely, so that the lord and his retainers would have plenty of game to hunt. Hunting was also a major recreation for the lord and his men.
Garth Holman

Go Social Studies Go! | feudal-japan - 0 views

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    Japanese Feudalism 
Gabriela R

LEGO: THE FEUDAL SYSTEM - YouTube - 0 views

    • Gabriela R
       
      Actually shows the history of the feudalism (except for spiderman). It also shows the lives of the social classes. 
Lily S

Government in the middle ages - 0 views

    • Lily S
       
      For what feudalism does
Patrick M

▶ The Medieval Manor - YouTube - 0 views

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    Its a great video and it tells you a lot of information.
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    A decent video
Garth Holman

HISTORY OF FEUDALISM - 0 views

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    "The top players in feudal Europe come from a small group of people - an aristocracy, based on skill in battle, with a shared commitment to a form of Christianity (at once power-hungry and idealistic) in which the pope in Rome has special powers as God's representative on earth. As a great feudal lord with moral pretensions, holding the ring between secular sovereigns, the pope can be seen as Europe's headmaster. Bishops and abbots are part of the small feudal aristocracy, for they are mostly recruited from the noble families holding the great fiefs. Indeed bishops can often be found on the battlefield, fighting it out with with the best. As in any other context, the strongest argument in feudalism - transcending the niceties of loyalty - is naked force. The Normans in England or in Sicily rule by right of conquest, and feudal disputes are regularly resolved in battle. But feudalism also provides many varieties of justification for force. And the possession of a good justification is almost as reassuring to a knight as a good suit of armour. One excellent excuse for warfare is the approval of the church. In 1059 the pope virtually commands the Normans to attack Sicily, by giving them feudal rights over territory not as yet theirs. Similarly Rome lets it be known that the Holy See is on the side of William when he invades England in 1066. Another important form of justification is a dynastic claim to a territory. Generations of marriages, carefully arranged for material gain, result in an immensely complex web of relationships - reflected often in kingdoms of very surprising shape on the map of Europe.
Garth Holman

Medieval Civilization: Lecture Notes - 2 views

  • Feudalism and Manorialism
  • The noble class developed a value system (later called chivalry)
  • Three-field system was used, with one field planted in the autumn, one in the spring, and one fallow.
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  • Power and prestige of the noble class based on land (the fief)
  • feudalism was a political arrangement that provided for the performance of these functions of government by a class of landed nobles.  Nobles bound by an interdependent system of personal ties; the heart was the feudal contract, which established relations between lord and vassal, the most important of which were protection and service.
  • knights were to be Christian, brave, faithful, generous, and protective of women and the poor; evidence of this code may be found the French epic The Song of Roland and the Spanish El Cid.
  • which supported the lord, his family, and his soldiers.  Landed estate organized as manors; each a self-supporting economic unit; the lord provided the land and protection; serfs provided the labor.
  • Serfs (=landless peasants) bound to the soil; could not be bought or sold individually; they passed new owners when land changed hands.  Medieval farming methods primitive; yield was low
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    Scroll about one-third of the way down, and you can find a great diagram of how the feudal system works. There is also a map of what a fief would look like. I highlighted where they have some information on feudalism and manorialism.
ca21dcs

Feudalism and Religion in the Middle Ages - 7 views

  • eudalism was the main political system in the Middle Ages.
  • The Church had the same amount, if not more, power and wealth than the kings.
  • All schools taught religion, most politicians were also priests, and no food was eaten without first saying thanks to God.
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  • priests had quite a lot of influence over the people.
  • Priests also collected a tenth of whatever the peasants had produced from their land over the course of the year. This was called a "tithe."
  • Anyone who was suspected of disagreeing with the church's teachings was called a heretic and burnt at the stake.
  • even if they did make it to heaven in the afterlife, they would have to spend a thousand years in purgatory to be cleansed of their sins on earth. So, many rich people would pay the church to say extra masses for them in the hope that it would reduce the amount of time in purgatory.
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    This site is very good for finding out important things about the middle ages.
Garth Holman

Feudalism at mrdowling.com - 0 views

  • Feudalism was the system of loyalties and protections during the Middle Ages. As the Roman Empire crumbled, emperors granted land to nobles in exchange for their loyalty. These lands eventually developed into manors. A manor is the land owned by a noble and everything on it. A typical manor consisted of a castle, a small village, and farmland
  • During the Middle Ages, peasants could no longer count on the Roman army to protect them. German, Viking and Magyar tribes overran homes and farms throughout Europe. The peasants turned to the landowners, often called lords, to protect them. Some peasants remained free, but many became serfs. A serf was bound to the land. He could not leave without buying his freedom, an unlikely occurrence in the Middle Ages. Life for a serf was not much better than the life of a slave. The only difference was that a serf could not be sold to another manor.
Jack S

The Middle Ages: Feudal Life - 2 views

shared by Jack S on 20 Dec 11 - Cached
  • or safety and for defense, people in the Middle Ages formed small communities around a central lord or master. Most people lived on a manor, which consisted of the castle, the church, the village, and the surrounding farm land. These manors were isolated, with occasional visits from peddlers, pilgrims on their way to the Crusades, or soldiers from other fiefdoms.
  • n this "feudal" system, the king awarded land grants or "fiefs" to his most important nobles, his barons, and his bishops, in return for their contribution of soldiers for the king's armies. At the lowest echelon of society were the peasants, also called "serfs" or "villeins." In exchange for living and working on his land, known as the "demesne," the lord offered his peasants protection.
    • Jack S
       
      Property Takes a big role
    • josh j
       
      Religion takes a bigger role than property I think. :)
Paige S.

Medieval Life - Feudalism - 7 views

  • Knights were given land by a Baron in return for military service when demanded by the King. They also had to protect the Baron and his family, as well as the Manor, from attack.
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    This site has a picture that visually explains medieval life and feudalism. It also gives a bit of information about each class. 
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    A short way to explain the manor from different point of veiws
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