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Gut Conditions & Parkinson's: Groundbreaking Link Revealed - 0 views

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    Digestive issues such as constipation, dysphagia and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may be precursors of Parkinson's disease, according to research published in the journal Gut. Gastrointestinal symptoms are thought to precede the development of some cerebrovascular disease, including brain aneurysm or Alzheimer's disease, and it has been suggested (Braak's hypothesis) that gut conditions may precede the development of Parkinson's disease too. To test this hypothesis, researchers used data from a US nationwide medical record network (TriNetX) to compare 24,624 people who had been diagnosed with Parkinson's disease of unknown cause with those who had been diagnosed with other neurological conditions - Alzheimer's disease (19,046) or cerebrovascular disease (23,942) - or with none of these (24,624; comparison group).
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Alzheimer disease : New insights on treatment - 0 views

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    According to Alzheimer's Disease International, more than 55 million people worldwide will have Alzheimer's disease by 2020. This figure will nearly double every 20 years, reaching 78 million in 2030 and 139 million in 2050. The WHO Global Status Report for 2021 estimated the yearly global cost of dementia to be more than USD 1.3 trillion, with a projected increase to USD 2.8 trillion by 2030. To date most drugs developed to treat Alzheimer's disease have failed, largely because they target wrong biomarkers and individuals already exhibiting signs of the disease. Once symptoms appear, however, many brain cells responsible for memory and cognition are likely already damaged and beyond repair. Professor Shai Rahimipour in the Chemistry Department at Bar-Ilan University in Israel has pioneered a different approach utilizing theranostics to pinpoint and treat the earliest, pre-symptomatic signs of Alzheimer's disease. Showing promise in stopping progression of the disease before onset of irreversible brain cell damage, Rahimipour's groundbreaking approach has garnered significant attention in the scientific world.
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Chiesi Farmaceutici acquires Amryt Pharma - 0 views

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    Chiesi Farmaceutici, the international, research-focused biopharmaceuticals and healthcare group has acquired Amryt Pharma, a global biopharmaceutical company dedicated to developing novel treatments for rare diseases. More than 300 million people worldwide are affected by rare diseases, including those who are living with ultra-rare metabolic and dermatologic conditions who still have no approved treatment. The acquisition reinforces Chiesi's commitment to deliver innovative treatments to patients with highly unmet medical needs. As a benefit corporation and a B Corp, Chiesi strives to create a world where it is common to have a therapy for all diseases and acts as a force for good, for society and the planet. Chiesi's Head of Chiesi Global Rare diseases Giacomo Chiesi commented: "We are excited to add the Amryt family to our company in this acquisition that demonstrates our commitment to rare diseases and aligns with our growth strategy through partnerships beyond internal research and development." Chiesi's new CEO Giuseppe Accogli said: "By joining forces and expertise we will be able to grow our capabilities and further strengthen our position to provide a positive impact on patients living with rare diseases." With regard to the financing of the deal, cash consideration has been partially financed through a EUR 700m syndicated loan led by BNP Paribas and Crédit Agricole as Global Coordinators and ESG Structuring Banks, acting alongside BPER and Deutsche Bank as Mandated Lead Arrangers. Crédit Agricole is Loan Agent too. Lenders have been advised by Clifford Chance, while Baker and McKenzie has assisted Chiesi Farmaceutici.
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AstraZeneca to stop developing Crohn's disease drug - 0 views

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    British drugmaker AstraZeneca said on Thursday (June 1) it would stop developing its drug brazikumab to treat inflammatory bowel diseases, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. The company said the discontinuation was due to a delay in the drug's development timeline, affected by global events and "the context of a competitive landscape". AstraZeneca regained the rights to brazikumab from Allergan in 2020 following U.S. drugmaker AbbVie's $63 billion tie-up with Allergan. AbbVie will stop funding the drug's development, AstraZeneca said. AbbVie's Skyrizi also treats Crohn's disease.
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Cancer A Leading Chronic Disease And Prevention | Your Health Our Priority - 0 views

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    A cancer registry is the cancer cases which are registered in a population or specific country. In whole world mortality rate due to cancer is 20%. In USA cancer is the second largest disease of causing death after heart disease. Recently in 2016 estimated that 595,690 people die from this disease according to cancer statistics of National Cancer Institute USA.
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NICE Forxiga To Treat Chronic Kidney Disease - 0 views

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    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) today issued a draft guidance recommending dapagliflozin, sold under the brand name Forxiga among others, as an option for treating certain adults with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Dapagliflozin belongs to a group of medicines called sodium glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. It is the first SGLT2 inhibitor to be recommended through NICE's technology appraisal process for CKD. Adding dapagliflozin to current standard care has been shown to significantly reduce the risk of having declining kidney function, end-stage kidney disease, or dying from causes related to the kidneys or cardiovascular system. "Dapagliflozin is a promising treatment for certain people with chronic kidney disease and it has the potential to increase the length of time before the disease gets worse," Meindert Boysen, deputy chief executive and director of the NICE Centre for Health Technology Evaluation, said.
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Alzheimer's:Next frontier for Novo Nordisk - 0 views

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    Diabetes drugs that also promote weight loss such as Novo Nordisk's Ozempic, becoming a darling of celebrities and investors, are being studied to tackle some of the most difficult-to-treat brain disorders, including Alzheimer's disease. Diabetes regimens, from Ozempic to old mainstays like insulin and metformin, appear to address several different aspects of the metabolic system implicated in Alzheimer's disease, including a protein called amyloid and inflammation, researchers say. The hope is that improving glucose utilisation and tamping down inflammation in the entire body - including the brain - could slow progression of debilitating diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Several scientists interviewed by Reuters news agency pointed to mounting research supporting testing diabetes drugs against neurodegenerative diseases. Results are years away and success uncertain. But interest has been buoyed by recent positive data on Alzheimer's drugs developed by Eisai with partner Biogen and by Eli Lilly demonstrating that removing sticky amyloid plaques accumulated in the brain can slow cognition decline caused by the fatal mind-wasting disease. Those successes followed decades of futility that had left many questioning the validity of the amyloid theory behind most experimental Alzheimer's drugs.
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What Is Leprosy Disease? | Health Blog - 0 views

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    What Is Leprosy Disease? Leprosy is a chronic, granulomatous infection caused by the... According to historical records, this disease spread through the slave trade and migration routes from... In this article, we talk about the causes, symptoms, and treatment of Leprosy
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    Like TB, leprosy is caused by a bacterium. The bacterium is Mycobacterium Leprae. It was discovered by Armauer Hansen in Norway in 1873. This is why it is also called Hansen's disease. Although its bacterial nature was known at the time, it was not considered infectious.
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Alcohol Consumption During Pandemic Led Liver Disease: Study - 0 views

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    Researchers have projected the rates of liver disease and associated deaths due to increased alcohol consumption during the Covid-19 pandemic. The research has been published in the 'Hepatology Journal'. A team led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital used data from a national survey of US adults on their drinking habits that found that excessive drinking (such as binge drinking) increased by 21 per cent during the Covid-19 pandemic. The scientists simulated the drinking trajectories and liver disease trends in all US adults. They estimated that a one-year increase in alcohol consumption during the Covid-19 pandemic will result in 8,000 additional deaths from alcohol-related liver disease, 18,700 cases of liver failure, and 1,000 cases of liver cancer by 2040. In the short term, alcohol consumption changes due to Covid-19 are expected to cause 100 additional deaths and 2,800 additional cases of liver failure by 2023. The researchers noted that a sustained increase in alcohol consumption for more than one year could result in 19-35 per cent additional mortality.
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GSK And Arrowhead To Develop drug For Fatty Liver Disease - 0 views

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    Arrowhead Pharmaceuticals on Monday (November 22) entered a drug development deal with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) under which the British drugmaker will develop and market Arrowhead's potential treatment for patients with fatty liver disease NASH. Under the pact, Arrowhead said it would get an upfront payment of $120 million and is eligible for additional milestone payments including up to $190 million at first commercial sale of the product, and up to $590 million in sales-related milestone payments. The drug candidate, ARO-HSD, is currently in an early-to-mid stage trial for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), a fatty liver disease. It is based on RNA interference technology, where genes that contribute to disease are silenced.
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Good cholesterol level:Predictive value varies by race - 0 views

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    The widely-held concept that levels of "good" cholesterol in the blood can indicate heart disease risk is not equally true for Blacks and whites, and the measure itself may be of less value than previously thought, according to a U.S. study published on Monday (November 21). Various types of cholesterol are thought to have either healthy or unhealthy effects. Low levels of so-called "good" high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol were linked with higher odds for developing cardiac problems in the long-term study - but only in white participants, the study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found. In contradiction to what has generally been assumed, low HDL levels did not confer any higher risk of heart disease in Black people, researchers said. Among white people, however, those with HDL levels below 40 milligrams per deciliter had a 22% higher risk for coronary heart disease compared with those whose HDL levels were higher. High HDL levels (above 60 mg/dL), which are thought to be protective, were not linked with lower coronary heart disease risks in either race, researchers found.
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Alzheimer success research unlocks hope for future therapies - 0 views

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    The first big breakthrough in 30 years of Alzheimer's research is providing momentum for clinical trials of "cocktail" treatments targeting the two hallmark proteins associated with the mind-robbing disease, according to interviews with researchers and pharmaceutical executives. Drugmakers Eisai and Biogen reported in September that their therapy lecanemab could slow progress of the disease by 27% over 18 months compared with a placebo. The finding validates the theory that clearing the amyloid protein that forms clumps in the brains of Alzheimer's patients could slow or halt the disease and has strengthened the support from some scientists for simultaneously targeting another notorious protein linked to Alzheimer's: tau. Eisai and Biogen are scheduled to present full data from their lecanemab study on Tuesday at the Clinical Trials on Alzheimer's Disease conference in San Francisco. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is expected to make a decision by early January on the companies' application for accelerated approval. If approved on an accelerated basis, the companies said they would immediately apply for full U.S. regulatory approval which could help secure Medicare coverage.
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Eli Lilly drug slows Alzheimer's by 35%:Company - 0 views

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    An experimental Alzheimer's drug developed by Eli Lilly and Co slowed cognitive decline by 35% in a late-stage trial, the company said on Wednesday, providing what experts say is the strongest evidence yet that removing sticky amyloid plaques from the brain benefits patients with the fatal disease. Lilly's drug, donanemab, met all goals of the trial, the company said. It slowed progression of Alzheimer's by 35% compared to a placebo in 1,182 people with early-stage disease whose brains had deposits of two key Alzheimer's proteins, beta amyloid as well as intermediate levels of tau, a protein linked with disease progression and brain cell death. The study also evaluated the drug in 552 patients with high levels of tau and found that when both groups were combined, donanemab slowed progression by 29% based on a commonly used scale of dementia progression known as the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR-SB). Using that scale, experts said Lilly's findings were roughly on par with Eisai Co Ltd and Biogen Inc's lecanemab, sold under the brand name Leqembi, which reduced cognitive decline by 27% in patients with early Alzheimer's in a study published last year. The results drove Lilly's shares to a record high, up more than 6% at $429.85. Dr. Ronald Petersen, an Alzheimer's researcher at Mayo Clinic, said Lilly's trial is the third to show removing amyloid from the brain slows progression of the disease, which could put to rest some lingering doubts about the benefits of drugs in the class and the amyloid-lowering theory. "It's modest, but I think it's real," he said of the benefit, "and I think it's clinically meaningful." Dr. Erik Musiek, a Washington University neurologist at Barnes-Jewish Hospital, said the efficacy looks as good or better than lecanemab.
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Monkeypox designated a notifiable disease - 0 views

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    The UK Health Security Agency (UKHSA) has said that monkeypox is to be listed as a notifiable disease in law from Wednesday (June 8). The new legislation means all doctors in England are required to notify their local council or local Health Protection Team (HPT) if they suspect a patient has monkeypox. Laboratories must also notify the UKHSA if the monkeypox virus is identified in a laboratory sample. Wendi Shepherd, monkeypox incident director at UKHSA, said: "Rapid diagnosis and reporting is the key to interrupting transmission and containing any further spread of monkeypox. This new legislation will support us and our health partners to swiftly identify, treat and control the disease. "It also supports us with the swift collection and analysis of data which enables us to detect possible outbreaks of the disease and trace close contacts rapidly, whilst offering vaccinations where appropriate to limit onward transmission."
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Alzheimer's :Sugar molecule in blood can predict - 0 views

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    Early detection and treatment of Alzheimer's disease require the use of dependable and cost-effective screening technologies. Researchers at Sweden's Karolinska Institutet have revealed that the level of tau, a protein that plays a vital role in the development of severe dementia, is associated with a kind of sugar molecule in the blood. The study, which is published in Alzheimer's & Dementia, can pave the way for a simple screening procedure able to predict onset ten years in advance. "The role of glycans, structures made up of sugar molecules, is a relatively unexplored field in dementia research," says the study's first author Robin Zhou, medical student and affiliated researcher at the Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet. "We demonstrate in our study that blood levels of glycans are altered early during the development of the disease. This could mean that we'll be able to predict the risk of Alzheimer's disease with only a blood test and a memory test." In Alzheimer's disease, the neurons of the brain die, which is thought to be a result of the abnormal accumulation of the proteins amyloid beta and tau. Clinical trials for Alzheimer's drugs show that treatment should commence early in the pathological process, before too many neurons have died, to reverse the process before it is too late.
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DHSC seek views to tackle major health conditions in England - 0 views

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    The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) has invited views of healthcare professionals and others to tackle the six major health conditions which drive-ill health and contribute to the burden of disease in England. The six major health conditions - cancer; cardiovascular diseases including stroke and diabetes; chronic respiratory diseases; dementia; mental ill-health and musculoskeletal disorders - affect millions of people in England with data showing that one in four suffer from two or more of these major long-term conditions. Recognising the pressure these conditions are putting on the NHS, the government is seeking views on a new strategy to tackle them that will focus not only on treatment but also on prevention. Government is particularly interested in hearing from those who suffer from, care for or provide treatment to people who suffer from multiple long-term conditions. This is to ensure the Major Conditions Strategy is one that will better prevent, diagnose, manage and treat these conditions. Contributions are also encouraged from those working in NHS bodies, local government, the voluntary and community sector, and wider industry, on how best to tackle suffering from one or more of these major conditions. Particularly, it is seeking perspectives on how government and the NHS can work better together with different organisations and sectors to improve the nation's health.
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Omicron subvariants spread:Risk of Covid deaths rising-ECDC - 0 views

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    Two new subvariants of Omicron - BA.4 and BA.5 - are spreading much faster than other corovanirus variants in Europe, which could lead to more hospitalisations and deaths as they become dominant, the EU's disease prevention agency said on Monday (June 13). Most EU countries have so far detected low rates of the two subgroups. But in countries where the proportion has risen - such as Portugal, where BA.5 accounted for 87 per cent of cases by May 30 - there have been surges in overall cases, according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). The two sublineages were added to the World Health Organization's monitoring list in March and have also been designated as variants of concern by the ECDC. Variants BA.4 and BA.5 do not appear to carry a higher risk of severe disease than other forms of Omicron.But an increase in case numbers from higher transmission rates risks leading to an increase in hospitalisations and deaths, the agency said. "The growth advantage reported for BA.4 and BA.5 suggest that these variants will become dominant," ECDC said in a statement on its website.
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Blood Test: Importance and What They Tell About Your Health - 0 views

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    Regular blood testing is a crucial element in making sure you are healthy. Consecutive blood tests allow you to keep track of how your body changes over time while helping you make informed decisions regarding your health. WHAT DO BLOOD TESTS SHOW? Blood tests are designed to help your doctor see how your organs work. Some organ functions that can be detected with blood testing include your kidneys, liver, and thyroid. Your doctor will also use blood tests for finding disease markers and signs of other health conditions, such as HIV, diabetes, coronary heart disease, cancer, and anemia. Even if you don't have heart disease, blood tests can tell you if you are at risk of developing this condition. Other blood tests are used to determine if the medications you take work properly and to see how well your blood clots. Keep reading to learn more about the most important blood tests. You can also find out more about these when you contact NovoPath.
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Community Pharmacy : Role in Preventing CVD Deaths - 0 views

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    Community pharmacies are well placed to play a role in preventing deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) said Director of NHS Services. The recent analysis by the British Heart Foundation (BHF) revealed that nearly 100,000 more people with cardiovascular disease than expected have died since the start of the pandemic in England. Latest figures show that the number of people waiting for time-sensitive cardiac care was at a record high of nearly 390,000 at the end of April in England. Average ambulance response times for heart attacks and strokes have consistently been above 30 minutes since the beginning of 2022, and in December 2022 they even breached 90 minutes. The target is 18 minutes, though the Government has set a new average target of 30 minutes over 2023/24. Director of NHS Services, Alastair Buxton, said: "It is concerning to hear that there have been tens of thousands of preventable deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. We share BHF's desire to see more action on preventing the causes of CVD and, subject to appropriate funding being in place, community pharmacy teams are well placed to play a role in this.
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UK must swiftly fend off competition | Life sciences Vision - 0 views

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    The UK must act swiftly to fend off competition if it wants to build the world's leading life sciences sciences hub, a new report suggests. A year on from the launch of the government's life science vision, the report commissioned by the the Association of the British Pharmaceutical Industry said although achieving the ambition remained feasible, the UK would need an attractive business environment because its competitor countries were becoming more adept at attracting investment. To achieve the ambition of the vision, the PwC-produced report suggested raising pharmaceutical R&D investment in the UK to build a 'stronger manufacturing and research infrastructure', alongside better investment in, access to and uptake of innovative medicines. It said the UK would also need to adopt a renewed approach to the priority healthcare challenges identified in the government's 'Life Science Vision', which would mean cutting the overall burden on health of dementia, cancer, cardiovascular and respiratory disease and mental health. The report quantified the size of the prize if the vision was implemented in full and the UK could emulate the successes of leading EU countries, which included: £68 billion in additional GDP over 30 years, owing to increased R&D investment £16.3 billion additional annual GDP from increased pharmaceutical exports Supporting 85,000 additional jobs Up to 40 per cent decrease in disease burden across the whole UK - for areas like cardiovascular disease, mental health conditions and Cancer. Reduced variation in speed of access to new medicines within three months of licensing for all NHS patients.
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