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Vicki Davis

Blogging in the Classroom - Flat Classrooms - 1 views

  • The presenter, Konrad Glogowski, an eigth grade writing teacher, discussed his use of blogs as a "third place" for students to express themselves. The first place being students home, the second school, and the third, a sort of place where they are free to creatively express themselves. At the begining of the year, Mr. Glogowski challenged his students to "grow" a blog. He presented them a visual to assist them in planning their creation and, pretty much, allowed them the freedom to make their own product. He watched as the blogs and classroom community grew. Fellow students commented on one another's blog entries, offering advice and building fellow classmates confidence in their writing. Mr. Glogowski's role as teacher evolved into a reader of work and a partner in learning rather than an evaluator and expert of information. By the end of the year, his students had great pride in their work, bonded as a communtiy, and were better, more confident, writers. The likely hood that they would continue to work on their blogs and writing was extremely high. Mr. Glogowski's strategy and his educational philosophy towards blogging was a success.
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    Excellent discussion about Blogging in the classroom from Rob Kamrowski on the Flat Classroom Ning. Rob says: "The presenter, Konrad Glogowski, an eigth grade writing teacher, discussed his use of blogs as a "third place" for students to express themselves. The first place being students home, the second school, and the third, a sort of place where they are free to creatively express themselves. At the begining of the year, Mr. Glogowski challenged his students to "grow" a blog. He presented them a visual to assist them in planning their creation and, pretty much, allowed them the freedom to make their own product. He watched as the blogs and classroom community grew. Fellow students commented on one another's blog entries, offering advice and building fellow classmates confidence in their writing. Mr. Glogowski's role as teacher evolved into a reader of work and a partner in learning rather than an evaluator and expert of information. By the end of the year, his students had great pride in their work, bonded as a communtiy, and were better, more confident, writers. The likely hood that they would continue to work on their blogs and writing was extremely high. Mr. Glogowski's strategy and his educational philosophy towards blogging was a success." This person did not attend necc, but watched Konrad present via ustream via Will Richardson's blog. Ascyhronous conferences are so important. Can we make it part of conference best practice?
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    Overview of Konrad Glowgoski's presentation for necc.
Fabian Aguilar

Educational Leadership:Literacy 2.0:Orchestrating the Media Collage - 1 views

  • Public narrative embraces a number of specialty literacies, including math literacy, research literacy, and even citizenship literacy, to name a few. Understanding the evolving nature of literacy is important because it enables us to understand the emerging nature of illiteracy as well. After all, regardless of the literacy under consideration, the illiterate get left out.
  • Modern literacy has always meant being able to both read and write narrative in the media forms of the day, whatever they may be. Just being able to read is not sufficient.
  • The act of creating original media forces students to lift the hood, so to speak, and see media's intricate workings that conspire to do one thing above all others: make the final media product appear smooth, effortless, and natural. "Writing media" compels reflection about reading media, which is crucial in an era in which professional media makers view young people largely in terms of market share.
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  • As part of their own intellectual retooling in the era of the media collage, teachers can begin by experimenting with a wide range of new media to determine how they best serve their own and their students' educational interests. A simple video can demonstrate a science process; a blog can generate an organic, integrated discussion about a piece of literature; new media in the form of games, documentaries, and digital stories can inform the study of complex social issues; and so on. Thus, a corollary to this guideline is simply, "Experiment fearlessly." Although experts may claim to understand the pedagogical implications of media, the reality is that media are evolving so quickly that teachers should trust their instincts as they explore what works. We are all learning together.
  • Both essay writing and blog writing are important, and for that reason, they should support rather than conflict with each other. Essays, such as the one you are reading right now, are suited for detailed argument development, whereas blog writing helps with prioritization, brevity, and clarity. The underlying shift here is one of audience: Only a small portion of readers read essays, whereas a large portion of the public reads Web material. Thus, the pressure is on for students to think and write clearly and precisely if they are to be effective contributors to the collective narrative of the Web.
  • The demands of digital literacy make clear that both research reports and stories represent important approaches to thinking and communicating; students need to be able to understand and use both forms. One of the more exciting pedagogical frontiers that awaits us is learning how to combine the two, blending the critical thinking of the former with the engagement of the latter. The report–story continuum is rich with opportunity to blend research and storytelling in interesting, effective ways within the domain of new media.
  • The new media collage depends on a combination of individual and collective thinking and creative endeavor. It requires all of us to express ourselves clearly as individuals, while merging our expression into the domain of public narrative. This can include everything from expecting students to craft a collaborative media collage project in language arts classes to requiring them to contribute to international wikis and collective research projects about global warming with colleagues they have never seen. What is key here is that these are now "normal" kinds of expression that carry over into the world of work and creative personal expression beyond school.
  • Students need to be media literate to understand how media technique influences perception and thinking. They also need to understand larger social issues that are inextricably linked to digital citizenship, such as security, environmental degradation, digital equity, and living in a multicultural, networked world. We want our students to use technology not only effectively and creatively, but also wisely, to be concerned with not just how to use digital tools, but also when to use them and why.
  • Fluency is the ability to practice literacy at the advanced levels required for sophisticated communication within social and workplace environments. Digital fluency facilitates the language of leadership and innovation that enables us to translate our ideas into compelling professional practice. The fluent will lead, the literate will follow, and the rest will get left behind.
  • Digital fluency is much more of a perspective than a technical skill set. Teachers who are truly digitally fluent will blend creativity and innovation into lesson plans, assignments, and projects and understand the role that digital tools can play in creating academic expectations that are authentically connected, both locally and globally, to their students' lives.
  • Focus on expression first and technology second—and everything will fall into place.
Vicki Davis

Coalition for Science After School - 0 views

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    Science and Technology After School Seminars
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    This is the Coalition's website for After School activities - this is the detail from the American Express proposal that I shared also in this post. If you like this idea and organization, please go vote at the American express link. Thanks!
adina sullivan

http://rea.ccdmd.qc.ca/ri/Expressions/debutEN.asp?sw=1024&sh=768 - 0 views

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    English language Idiomatic expresessions explained and illistrated. Check the cartoons in the "activities" section. French and Spanish expressions also. Thx to Larry Ferlazzo for link
Dennis Richards

Horizon Report 2010 K-12 Edition - 8 views

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    The Horizon Report series is the most visible outcome of the New Media Consortium's Horizon Project, an ongoing research effort established in 2002 that identifies and describes emerging technologies likely to have a large impact on teaching, learning, research, or creative expression within education around the globe. This volume, the 2010 Horizon Report: K-12 Edition, examines emerging technologies for their potential impact on and use in teaching, learning, and creative expression within the environment of pre-college education.
Kathy Benson

LER0053 | Calculator Caddy | SS-7716 - 1 views

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    store active expressions so they can be passed out quickly a table at a time, label caddy by table, label expressions by seat
Kathy Benson

ler0053 - Calculator Caddy - 2 views

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    store active expressions so they can be passed out quickly a table at a time, label caddy by table, label expressions by seat
Vicki Davis

Free Technology for Teachers: Save Time by Using JoeZoo Express to Give Feedback in Google Docs - 0 views

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    JoeZoo express can help you grade and edit your student work faster. Here are some tutorials and information on using JoeZoo by Richard Byrne.
Vicki Davis

Members Project - 0 views

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    American express grants for educational activities.
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    American Express has a set of proposals for education and is asking us to vote on their proposals. The organizers of this particular project have contacted me directly and asked me to share it with you. Take a look. I do wish there wer emore specifics about the project as I think we've got a watered down version here. However, the more science and technology, the better.
Anne Bubnic

Blogs allow kids at Gilbert school to express feelings - 0 views

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    Students, administrators and teachers at Gilbert Classical Academy have a new tool to express themselves that is rarely tapped by schools as a teaching aid: blogs. Blogs have been available on the Internet for years, offering Web users an opportunity to opine on various subjects and post images in a personal journal that anyone on the Internet can read. But schools have generally not utilized them as a classroom tool because officials have such worries as: What if inappropriate messages are posted? What if a hacker steals personal information on a child or staff member?
Danielle Klaus

NoodleTools : NoodleBib Express - 0 views

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    Just need one or two quick citations? No need to log in or subscribe -- simply generate them in NoodleBib Express and copy and paste what you need into your document. Note: citations are not saved and cannot be exported to a word processor using this version of the tool.
David Warlick

Reggio Emilia approach - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia - 4 views

  • Children must have some control over the direction of their learning; Children must be able to learn through experiences of touching, moving, listening, seeing, and hearing; Children have a relationship with other children and with material items in the world that children must be allowed to explore and Children must have endless ways and opportunities to express themselves.
    • David Warlick
       
      This is all very familiar yet rarely expressed so succinctly.
  • In the Reggio approach, the teacher is considered a co-learner and collaborator with the child and not just an instructor.
  • Teacher autonomy is evident in the absence of teacher manuals, curriculum guides, or achievement tests
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  • integration of each classroom with the rest of the school, and the school with the surrounding community
  • children can best create meaning and make sense of their world through environments which support "complex, varied, sustained, and changing relationships between people, the world of experience, ideas and the many ways of expressing ideas."
  • In each classroom there are studio spaces in the form of a large, centrally located atelier and a smaller mini-atelier, and clearly designated spaces for large- and small-group activities.
    • David Warlick
       
      A workshop or studio especially for an artist, designer or fashion house.
  • Reggio teachers place a high value on their ability to improvise and respond to children's predisposition to enjoy the unexpected.
  • Regardless of their origins, successful projects are those that generate a sufficient amount of interest and uncertainty to provoke children's creative thinking and problem-solving and are open to different avenues of exploration
  • teachers in Reggio Emilia assert the importance of being confused as a contributor to learning; thus a major teaching strategy is purposely to allow mistakes to happen, or to begin a project with no clear sense of where it might end.
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    The Reggio Emilia Approach is an educational philosophy focused on preschool and primary education. It was started by Loris Malaguzzi and the parents of the villages around Reggio Emilia in Italy after World War II. The destruction from the war, parents believed, necessitated a new, quick approach to teaching their children. They felt that it is in the early years of development that children are forming who they are as an individual. This led to creation of a program based on the principles of respect, responsibility, and community through exploration and discovery in a supportive and enriching environment based on the interests of the children through a self-guided curriculum.
Dave Truss

Learning is a Global Collaborative Classroom Project with @scmorgan - 6 views

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    Students from our two schools were grouped together to study an issue of social justice using web 2.0 tools. These tools help students put the best practice of collaborative learning into play by working with others to problem solve. Tools such as VoiceThread allow teachers to practice differentiated assessment. Being socially connected, students believe their contributions matter and they feel a stronger degree of responsibility to support their new partners. Students want an authentic audience to express themselves too.
Fred Delventhal

The generation raised on the internet | The kids are alright | The Economist - 0 views

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    WORRIES about the damage the internet may be doing to young people has produced a mountain of books-a suitably old technology in which to express concerns about the new. Robert Bly claims that, thanks to the internet, the "neo-cortex is finally eating itself". Today's youth may be web-savvy, but they also stand accused of being unread, bad at communicating, socially inept, shameless, dishonest, work-shy, narcissistic and indifferent to the needs of others.
Vicki Davis

Digiteen Dream Team: New Protest - 0 views

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    With class ending this week, my students want to once more go into Lively to express how they feel about this great service. They love it, although we are moving ahead to explore other options (which we'll announce in January) -- so, they want to have a virtual funeral for Lively which will happen this Thursday. Just check their blog and read this post from the students about what they are planning. Again, this is a student driven project - they are currently reflecting on this process and will be sharing their thoughts about whether the protest was worth it and what they have learned. Stay tuned, the Digiteen Dream Team is a great student blog that will continue!
John Evans

Interesting Quotes - a set on Flickr - 0 views

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    Dean Shareksi's interesing way of expressing quotes he finds, well, interesting!
Dennis Richards

Global Network Initiative - 0 views

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    Protecting and Advancing Freedom of Expression and Privacy in Information and Communications Technologies
Dennis Richards

injenuity » TLt - The People Behind the Learning - 0 views

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    In my earlier post, I mentioned how Twitter played such a prominent role in the TLt experience. There was another theme that threaded through almost every presentation and deep into the private conversations; the importance of family. I've never been to a conference where so many presenters boldly expressed how their family motivated them to share, learn, and create. My family sacrificed quite a bit for me to attend this conference, and I greatly appreciated being in the presence of others who recognized the importance of incorporating family values into your work life. Everyone I met was just a pleasure to be around. I would like to share a little about some of them. I can't list everyone I met, because I didn't spend much time with some of them, but hopefully I can help you get to know a few of those with whom I connected.
Jocelyn Chappell

Post election feedback | Aylesbury LIFE - 0 views

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    BWO Twitter: htjoshua @downingstreet what chance PM invites pupils 2write2 Mugabe on behalf of persecuted teachers who ran poll stations returning "wrong" results
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    In the light of post election persecution of teachers who ran poll stations returning the "wrong" results in Zimbabwe's recent elections, I have just asked our Prime Minister if he is going to invite pupils worldwide to write to Robert Mugabe expressing concern for: * teachers in fear of their lives, * pupils who miss learning, and * exams that cannot be run even. It happens the form of the question was by way of Twitter:
Ric Murry

Adobe Photoshop Express - Made You Look. - 0 views

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    hat tip to Barry Bachenheimer
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