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John Porterfield

ClassTools.net - Free Flash for Online Teaching - 2 views

  • Classtools.net provides free, customisable flash templates to embed into blogs, wikis and websites. There is no signup, no passwords, no charge...
  • Arcade Game Generator Random Name Picker Countdown Timer Dustbin Game Telescopic Topic Post It Diamond 9 Fishbone (Ishikawa) Venn Diagram Animated Book Timeline Lights Out Target Hamburger Living Graph Learning Cycle Jigsaw Diagram Priority Chart Source Analyser
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    This is a cool site that Vicki S. found Great Flash for the classroom
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    It has many templates for you to download and fill in blank and images.
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    Create free educational games and tools in flash. Either copy the link or embed the game in your website/blog/wiki.
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    free classroom tools--test maker, animated books, venn diagrams, flashcards, Ways to test Vocabulary and test questions
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    Since I'm not currently teaching an online course, I thought I could use this as an additional resource for my students' homework options. I could create the activities to mirror what we did in class, and assign them at home.
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    I saw this site and I am going to use it in my Website. I currently do not teach on-line classes but I really like what on-line classes offer to our students
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    Contains templates of graphic organizers and game engines
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    Great tool for creating review lessons.
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    Can create basic arcade style games that can be used to quiz students on different concepts being taught. Fun way for students to drill without realizing how much they are "studying!"
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    Classtools.net provides free, customisable flash templates to embed into blogs, wikis and websites. There is no signup, no passwords, no charges...
Brenda Vogds

Thirty-two Trends Affecting Distance Education: An Informed Foundation for Strategic Plannning - 1 views

  • Today’s adult learners differ still from traditional college-age students. They tend to be practical problem solvers. Their life experiences make them autonomous, self-directed, and goal- and relevancy-oriented—they need to know the rationale for what they are learning. They are motivated by professional advancement, external expectations, the need to better serve others, social relationships, escape or stimulation, and pure interest in the subject. Their demands include time and scheduling, money, and long-term commitment constraints. They also tend to feel insecure about their ability to succeed in distance learning, find instruction that matches their learning style, and have sufficient instructor contact, support services, and technology training (Dortch, 2003; Diaz, 2002; Dubois, 1996).
  • the percentage of women and minority learners is increasing
  • Studies comparing online course retention rates with traditional courses are inconclusive. This may be due to “the newness of online education, but individual schools and organizations are reporting that their online programs have as high or higher rates of retention as their traditional classroom offerings” (Roach, 2002, p. 23). Some claim that distance education attrition is high. A Chronicle of Higher education article in 2000 reported that “no national statistics exist yet about how many students complete distance programs or courses, but anecdotal evidence and studies by individual institutions suggest that course-completion and program-retention rates are generally lower in distance-education courses than in their face-to-face counterparts” (Brady, 2001, p. 352).
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  • “deliberate division of labor among the faculty, creating new kinds of instructional staff, or deploying nontenure-track instructional staff (such as adjunct faculty, graduate teaching assistants, or undergraduate assistants) in new ways”
  • The functions of instructors and facilitators then include being a “facilitator, teacher, organizer, grader, mentor, role model, counselor, coach, supervisor, problem solver, and liaison” (Riffee, 2003, p. 1; see also Roberson, 2002; Scagnoli, 2001).
  • One cannot dispute that there is proliferation of new information: “In the past, information doubled every 10 years; now it doubles every four years” (Aslanian, 2001, p. 5; see also Finkelstein, 1996). This growth in information will certainly continue to dramatically impact higher education and learning in general. Knowledge proliferation may increase content-breadth demands on higher education, spreading distance education resources ever thinner and complicating development decisions.
  • Stated differently, “Distance education can be seen to be evolving from an essentially modernist (bureaucratic or Fordist) form of education into a post-modernist phenomenon with a focus on the student as consumer, on flexibility and global reach” (Rumble, 2001, p. 31). With this transition, there is also a shift toward increased accessibility for those who are disabled. “Many feel that eLearning holds great promise…for learners with physical and mental challenges” (Frydenberg, 2002, p. 7).
  • the home school movement will lead to a home-college movement
  • Further, IT functionalities not imagined ten years ago are being realized. By 2018, computers will be able to “routinely translate languages in real-time with the accuracy and speed necessary for effective communications” (“Emerging,” 2003, p. 8; see also Cetron, 2003). “New technology will transform higher education as we know it today” (Oblinger et al., 2001, p. 2),
  • Undoubtedly, “the changing nature of the workforce in the Information Age … [will require] a continuous cycle of retraining and retooling”
  • Organizations from within and outside higher education are adapting to accommodate the growth in distance learning. For example, “human resource professionals and hiring managers are becoming more accepting of online degree credentials” (“Lifelong,” 2002, p. 77). Further, more and more university systems are “spinning off” new “virtual” or “online” universities—for example, Penn State’s World Campus, Arizona Regents University, California Virtual Campus, and many others.
    • Brenda Vogds
       
      This is an interesting quote given that 5 years ago we were still hearing that people just won't hire individuals with online degrees!
  • 30. The distinction between distance and local education is disappearing.
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    This article speaks to the stragetic planning of future needs of their institution. With consideration of many current factors and predicting the future. From infrastructure, to number of faculty, type of resources-texts and student demands. This article does a nice job of showing how education is becoming much more fluid a lot fewer lines.
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    32 trends that affect distance education--Research
Dennis OConnor

Common Sense Media for Educators Resources and Curriculum for Teachers - 1 views

  • Common Sense Education Programs Today’s kids connect, create, and collaborate through media. But who helps them reflect on the implications of their actions? Who empowers them to make responsible, respectful, and safe choices about how they use the powerful digital tools at their command? Our Common Sense Parent Media Education Program and our Digital Citizenship Curriculum give educators, administrators, and parents the tools and curricula they need to guide a generation in becoming responsible digital citizens.
  • Turn wired students into great digital citizens Get all the tools you need with our FREE Digital Literacy and Citizenship Curriculum and Parent Media Education Program. The relevant, ready-to-use instruction helps you guide students to make safe, smart, and ethical decisions in the digital world where they live, study and play. Every day, your students are tested with each post, search, chat, text message, file download, and profile update.
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    Free curriculum k-5 & 6-8. Parent and teacher education. Digital literacy and citizenship curriculum. Parent Media education Program.
Nigel Coutts

Educational Disadvantage - Socio-economic Status & Education Pt 1 - The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    The role that education plays in issues of social equity and justice cannot be undervalued. It is acknowledged by the United Nations as a human right, 'Everyone has the right to education' (United Nations, 1948) and as outlined in the Melbourne Declaration on the educational Goals for Young Australians 'As a nation Australia values the central role of education in building a democratic, equitable and just society- a society that is prosperous, cohesive and culturally diverse, and that values Australia's Indigenous cultures as a key part of the nation's history, present and future.' (Barr et al, 2008). Such lofty assertions of the importance of education as a right and national value should be sufficient to ensure that all Australians have access to an education of the highest standard with equitable outcomes for all, the reality is that this is not the case.
Dennis OConnor

Online Professional Development Courses | University of Wisconsin - Stout - 0 views

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    "E-learning and Online Teaching Courses and Certificate You may enroll in individual courses for professional development or to renew a license or complete all five courses if you are pursuing the E-Learning and Online Teaching Graduate Certificate. The courses are approved electives in the Master of Science in Education and the Master of Science in Career and Technical Education degree programs. EDUC 760 E-learning for Educators  3 graduate credits Summer: June 10 - August 2, 2019 Fall: September 9 - November 1, 2019 Register EDUC 762 Assessment in E-learning  3 graduate credits Fall: October 21 - December 13, 2019 Register EDUC 763 Instructional Design for E-learning  3 graduate credits Fall: October 21 - December 13, 2019 Register EDUC 761 Collaborative Communities in E-learning - Online Facilitation Skills  3 graduate credits Summer: June 24 - August 16, 2019 Fall: September 23 - November 15, 2019 Register EDUC 764 E-learning Practicum  3 graduate credits Note: The practicum may only be taken after all other courses for the Certificate in E-Learning and Online Teaching are completed. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor Fall: September 9 - December 13, 2019 Register"
Naomi Monson

Essay on what professors can learn from MOOCs | Inside Higher Ed - 3 views

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    Andrew, Ny. (2013, Jan. 24). Learning from MOOC. Inside Higher Ed. Retrieved from http://www.insidehighered.com/views/2013/01/24/essay-what-professors-can-learn-moocs Andrew Ng is an associate professor at Stanford University (Stanford Search which includes his homepage, publications, and courses taught). He also is the director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab and founded the Universities main MOOC platform. This lead to the co-founding of Coursera whose goal is to "to give everyone in the world access to a high quality education, for free" (Ny, 2013). Ng is someone who is worth following and reading his many publications on technology and his pioneering of MOOC courses at Stanford University. Learning from MOOC, is more of Ng's reflections on teaching courses in Coursera. He emphasizes that MOOC needs to be student centered and the ways they differ from brick and mortar. One way is the physical barrier but he states "But through today's technological advancements, online courses are very much alive. They are part of an ecosystem that, if nurtured through community discussion forums, meetups, e-mails, and social media (like Google+ hangouts), can flourish and grow" (Ny, 2013). The impact of MOOC have yet to be determined but Ny calls it an "exciting new breed of education" (2013). It worth noting who he is and the part he is playing in creating MOOC's. MOOC's are part of the personal learning environments that is the Horizon Report: 2011 K-12 Edition (2011, p 30) noted is emerging and a place to be researched. It is interesting to read the comments below in his essay of those who have taken courses through Coursea and one of the comments is the lack of statistical research to back up how effective are MOOC's and the part they will play in educating the future. Will it be an exciting new breed of education or will statistics reveal another effect? In conjunction with Ng's reflection on the advancement of technology, augment
Tracy Ndlovu

JOLT - Journal of Online Learning and Teaching - 8 views

  • This article presents important issues for educators to consider as they use these new tools by investigating the ramifications of moving academic activities to a public sphere and examining how laws that govern our academic freedoms and behaviors translate in this new environment. The discussion focuses on concerns specific to incorporating the use of social media and user-generated content into the teaching and learning environment in higher education, touching on compliance with disability and privacy law, intellectual property rights, copyright law, and the fair use exemption
  • Social Media Use in Higher Education: Key Areas to Consider for Educators
  • three important questions will be addressed: 1) What should educators know or consider as they employ these tools? 2) What are the ramifications of moving academic activities to the public sphere? 3) How do laws that govern our academic freedoms and behaviors apply in the online environment?
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  • this reality is one where teachers/educators relinquish some control to embrace the informal leaner-centered pedagogies empowering twenty-first century learners
  • learners can mix and match to best suit their individual learning styles and increase their academic success
  • such technologies are typically freely accessible, easy to incorporate, and have a minimal learning curve to master
  • can become personalized
  • extend class engagement beyond designated class time and to increase the quality and quantity of participation
  • this reality is one where teachers/educators relinquish some control to embrace the informal leaner-centered pedagogies empowering twenty-first century learners
  • this reality is one where teachers/educators relinquish some control to embrace the informal leaner-centered pedagogies empowering twenty-first century learners
  • this reality is one where teachers/educators relinquish some control to embrace the informal leaner-centered pedagogies empowering twenty-first century learners
  • multiple benefits for using SNS [social networking software], including, retention, socialization, collaborative learning, student engagement, sense of control and ownership
  • primary benefit of using the tool is for collaboration or extending engagement outside the classroom
  • faculty attitudes
  • slow-to-adopt-change nature of academia
  • Key Areas of Consideration for Educators
  • Missing from this dialogue, however, is discussion of how best to tackle some of the practical, less paradigm-shifting questions about ownership, privacy and security, access, accessibility and compliance, stability of technology, intellectual property rights, and copyright law.
  • The question really is one of ownership and rights: who owns not only the tangible item that is created, but the intellectual concepts, ideas or processes behind the creative work or property?
  • Increasingly, universities are respecting students’ IP rights, mainly by recognizing them as copyright holders of the work they create.
  • While faculty members may understand that having access to another’s work does not make them owners or give them rights to freely use the content as they wish, this concept may not be so clear for students. Recognizing the ease with which digital content can be copied, remixed, and reused, it is wise to facilitate discussions or assign readings about ownership and attribution, addressing ethical and legal content use.
  • Using mediated tools that capture discussions and activities in an open public space fixes these events for digital perpetuity and makes them potentially available to a world audience.
  • Will this public learning space inhibit risk-taking and instead foster a reluctance to share ideas with a broader audience for fear that these things will come back to haunt the student later?
  • Faculty should consider not only having a discussion about online privacy but also include a statement in their syllabus about proper conduct and expectations for both students and faculty.
  • faculty can use these issues as teaching topics that aim to enhance students’ media literacy.
  • faculty members need to consider a chosen medium’s ability to accommodate students’ diverse learning needs, which include accessibility as defined by the Americans with Disabilities Act
  • the availability of assistive technology tools to enhance accessibility for a wide range of challenges and disabilities seems to have increased
  • Online social media sites create an even more challenging environment as they are rich in media, images, and links facilitating complex interactions that use scripting languages not compatible with accessibility software
  • The most common stability issue for technology is likely the removal of content by the software web host or system provider because of a Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) take-down request
  • If being in a university-sponsored password protected online space that is limited to only the current class has created a fictitious safety net for using copyrighted materials, taking this class out into the open web--a public space available for the world to view--should spark some serious contemplation.
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    "This article presents important issues for educators to consider as they use (Web 2.0) tools by investigating the ramifications of moving academic activities to a public sphere and examining how laws that govern our academic freedoms and behaviors translate in this new environment. The discussion focuses on concerns specific to incorporating the use of social media and user-generated content into the teaching and learning environment in higher education, touching on compliance with disability and privacy law, intellectual property rights, copyright law, and the fair use exemption ..."
Dennis OConnor

Online Learning (Rowman & Littlefield Education) - 3 views

  • "Online education programs at the high school, undergraduate, and graduate levels represent one of the fastest growing trends in education today. However, online classes are completely different from any other educational endeavor and require a new set of skills. Bowman, who currently teaches online undergraduate and graduate courses, and her fellow contributors provide an excellent down-to-earth guide for anyone who is thinking about or participating in an online education program. This well-written and understandable book covers some theories of learning styles but focuses on the nuts-and-bolts skills needed to be successful. Each chapter explores a particular aspect of learning online and gives practical advice about how to participate successfully in an online learning environment. Verdict: Bowman and the other contributors have several years' experience helping students learn online, and their perspectives make this a practical and helpful guide to a prevalent and growing practice."— June 2010, Library Journal Starred Review
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    I've known Leslie Bowman for over a decade. She's a great online teacher. Her book is filled with the wisdom of experience. Check it out! ~ Dennis "Online education programs at the high school, undergraduate, and graduate levels represent one of the fastest growing trends in education today. However, online classes are completely different from any other educational endeavor and require a new set of skills. Bowman, who currently teaches online undergraduate and graduate courses, and her fellow contributors provide an excellent down-to-earth guide for anyone who is thinking about or participating in an online education program. This well-written and understandable book covers some theories of learning styles but focuses on the nuts-and-bolts skills needed to be successful. Each chapter explores a particular aspect of learning online and gives practical advice about how to participate successfully in an online learning environment. Verdict: Bowman and the other contributors have several years' experience helping students learn online, and their perspectives make this a practical and helpful guide to a prevalent and growing practice."- June 2010, Library Journal Starred Review "
mklaas4423

Consultancy Today for Tomorrow's World.pdf - 0 views

shared by mklaas4423 on 06 Mar 15 - No Cached
  • First the perspective of the classroom must change to become learner centered. Second, students and teachers must enter into a collaboration or partnership with technology in order to create a "community" that nurtures, encourages, and supports the learning process
  • Has the educational system reached the point of development where no further improvement can be expected from current educational technology?
  • This occurs when a teacher consciously decides to designate certain tasks and responsibilities to the technology, so, if the technology is suddenly removed or is unavailable, the teacher cannot proceed with the instruction as planned.
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  • igure 2. Philosophies of learning and teaching can be viewed as a continuum with extreme educational interpretations of behaviorism (for example, instruction) and cognitivism (for example, construction) at either end. Any one educator's philosophy resides somewhere on this line. The threshold between the two views marks a critical point of "transformation" for an educator.Consider instead a teacher who uses the same spreadsheet to have students build and construct the knowledge themselves, whether it be the principle of mathematical average or a range of "what if" relationships in economics or history. In this case, the product technology of the spreadsheet is directly supporting the idea technology of a "microworld" where students live and experience the content rather than just study it (Dede, 1987; Papert, 1981; Rieber, 1992).What are the most fundamental principles of learning that underlie the most contemporary views of idea technologies that will help all educators enter into the Reorientation phase of adoption? This is the goal of the next section.Contemporary Role of Technology in educationAmong many educational goals, t
  • Gregory and Denby Associates Figure 2. Philosophies of learning and teaching can be viewed as a continuum with extreme educational interpretations of behaviorism (for example, instruction) and cognitivism (for example, construction) at either end. Any one educator's philosophy resides somewhere on this line. The threshold between the two views marks a critical point of "transformation" for an educator.Consider instead a teacher who uses the same spreadsheet to have students build and construct the knowledge themselves, whether it be the principle of mathematical average or a range of "what if" relationships in economics or history. In this case, the product technology of the spreadsheet is directly supporting the idea technology of a "microworld" where students live and experience the content rather than just study it (Dede, 1987; Papert, 1981; Rieber, 1992).What are the most fundamental principles of learning that underlie the most contemporary views of idea technologies that will help all educators enter into the Reorientation phase of adoption? This is the goal of the next section.Contemporary Role of Technology in educationAmong many educational goals, three cognitive outcomes are that students should be able to remember, understand, and use information (Perkins, 1992). Apparently, one of these outcomes is very difficult to achieve.
  • Gregory and Denby Associates Figure 2. Philosophies of learning and teaching can be viewed as a continuum with extreme educational interpretations of behaviorism (for example, instruction) and cognitivism (for example, construction) at either end. Any one educator's philosophy resides somewhere on this line. The threshold between the two views marks a critical point of "transformation" for an educator.Consider instead a teacher who uses the same spreadsheet to have students build and construct the knowledge themselves, whether it be the principle of mathematical average or a range of "what if" relationships in economics or history. In this case, the product technology of the spreadsheet is directly supporting the idea technology of a "microworld" where students live and experience the content rather than just study it (Dede, 1987; Papert, 1981; Rieber, 1992).What are the most fundamental principles of learning that underlie the most contemporary views of idea technologies that will help all educators enter into the Reorientation phase of adoption? This is the goal of the next section.Contemporary Role of Technology in educationAmong many educational goals, three cognitive outcomes are that students should be able to rememb
  • understand, and use information (Perkins, 1992). Apparently, one of these outcomes is very difficult to achieve.
  • Although instruction has traditionally focused on learning specific content, much of contemporary curriculum development focuses on solving problems that require learners to develop ever evolving networks of facts, principles, and procedures. The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (1989), for example, suggested that greater emphasis be placed on solving open-ended "real world" problems in small groups, connecting mathematics with other content areas, and using computer-based tools to allow students to speculate and explore interrelationships among concepts rather than spending time on time-consuming calculations. To achieve such goals, learning should take place in environments that emphasize the interconnectedness of ideas across content domains
Nigel Coutts

Reflections from The Future of Education Conference - The Learner's Way - 0 views

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    The Future of Education is a topic often discussed, and at the recent gathering of educators in Florence, it was the title and theme for the conference. Now in its ninth year, The Future of Education is an international conference that attracts educators from around the world and across all domains touched by Education. The conference is an inspiring two days of discussion and sharing, with the city of Florence, the centre of the Renaissance, providing a constant reminder of what might be possible when creativity and critical thinking combine. Here are my key takeaways from this event.
Elizabeth Checkalski

Is Online Learning Right for Me? - 0 views

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    Other than saving the planet, what are the advantages of an online course? 1. Online courses are convenient. The biggest advantage of an online course is that your classroom and instructor (theoretically) are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Your only excuse for missing class is not getting online! Otherwise, everything is available to you. You can get announcements, access notes, review assignments, take practice quizzes, discuss questions, chat with fellow students and study any time you want. Other than certain due dates, you make your own schedule for completing the requirements of the course. 2. Online courses offer flexibility. You can study any time you want. You can study with whomever you want. You can study wearing anything you want (or nothing if you prefer!) Online courses give you the flexibility to spend time with work, family, friends, significant others or any other activity you like. You still have to complete the work (and this flexibility can be your downfall; see disadvantages) but for many people, with continually changing work schedules or people who make frequent business trips, parents with small children, students caring for others or whose health prevents them from making it to campus on a regular basis, students whose friends or boyfriend/girlfriend drop in unexpectedly, or for those days when the surf and/or snow is wicked, this method of course delivery can't be beat. 3. Online courses bring education right to your home. Online students often find that their family, friends and/or boy-girl-friends get involved in the course. Oftentimes, a student will study with that special someone present. Children may take an interest in the online environment. Parents may look over the shoulder of an online student while they are surfing across the web. In short, everyone in the household gets involved in learning. Having the support of your family and friends makes you
Don Wright

JISC : Supporting education and research - 0 views

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    Homepage of the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) website. JISC supports education and research in the use of information and communications technology (ICT)." />www.jisc.ac.uk/
Dennis OConnor

Guest post: An 'Arab Spring' of free online higher education - College, Inc. - The Washington Post - 3 views

    • Dennis OConnor
       
      A quality online teacher who understands how to use technology as a thinking tool will have an enormous advantage as a 21st Century educator. 
  • How will credentialing take place ? We think credentialing will go away, as the rating system will determine quality.
  • This one is more difficult to answer, as an outcome-based education may not necessarily rely on grades, and outcomes are difficult to measure in an absolute way.
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    • Dennis OConnor
       
      I have a masters degree in technology integration and instructional design from Western Governors University. It was outcome based.  I found it far more challenging than my first online masters degree.  I learned a great deal from both experiences.  
  • Christensen said that one innovation traditional colleges could make is to offer a few “gateway” majors, and then use technology to personalize and individualize teaching on specific subjects
  • Arab Spring of higher education is already starting to take place,
  • “higher education is not a luxury — it’s an economic imperative,” and institutions should “improve affordability” and ensure “higher rates of college completion”.
  • Professors and courses will be rated, and you will be able to see the top 100 courses that help you learn to program, for instance.
  • initiative to overcome resistance to change.
  • The stars are aligned for this new disruption to emerge — whether you call it “the unbundling of the university,” the “modularization of education” or “eliminating the middleman” (the College). Steve Jobs said, “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards.” However, when some of the bread crumbs start to line up, it is an indication that a change is coming.
  • For thousands of years now, the university has been the middleman of the higher education system. The university provided the needed infrastructure, the branding, and an easy route to a white collar job or graduate school.
  • The astonishing pace of technology in the last few years has changed the landscape of academia completely in several ways:
  • Radical changes in educational content and delivery mechanisms will lead to an unbundling of the university as we know it.
  • found Udacity, an education start-up that would offer low-cost online classes.
    • Dennis OConnor
       
      If (when) this happens, merit will be determined by teaching skill.  Ultimately, students won't want to take the 'easy' classes. They will want to take classes that help them learn.  
Dennis OConnor

Protecting Students With Disabilities - 0 views

  • Frequently Asked Questions About Section 504 and the Education of Children with Disabilities
  • An important responsibility of the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) is to eliminate discrimination on the basis of disability against students with disabilities
  • "No otherwise qualified individual with a disability in the United States . . . shall, solely by reason of her or his disability, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance . . . .
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  • Section 504 requires recipients to provide to students with disabilities appropriate educational services designed to meet the individual needs of such students to the same extent as the needs of students without disabilities are met.
  • A school district is out of compliance when it is violating any provision of the Section 504 statute or regulations.
  • 13. Does the meaning of the phrase "qualified student with a disability" differ on the basis of a student's educational level, i.e., elementary and secondary versus postsecondary?
  • Yes. At the elementary and secondary educational level, a "qualified student with a disability" is a student with a disability who is: of an age at which students without disabilities are provided elementary and secondary educational services; of an age at which it is mandatory under state law to provide elementary and secondary educational services to students with disabilities; or a student to whom a state is required to provide a free appropriate public education under the Individuals with Disabilities education Act (IDEA). At the postsecondary educational level, a qualified student with a disability is a student with a disability who meets the academic and technical standards requisite for admission or participation in the institution's educational program or activity.
  • Does the nature of services to which a student is entitled under Section 504 differ by educational level?
  • Yes. Public elementary and secondary recipients
  • At the postsecondary level,
Andrea Grinton

Film Educational Software - Making Learning Enjoyable - 0 views

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    Filmmaking education is always fun and more pleasure and even learning filmmaking online through the film educational tool can give you more fun than another learning method.
lovinget2

bcg.perspectives - The Five Faces of Online Education - 1 views

  • more nuanced way on the increasing diversity of expectations for the online experience.
  • They are vocal advocates for the benefits of the asynchronous, learn-at-your-own-pace convenience of conventionally delivered online education. This segment sees online as a great alternative to traditional, in-person education, rather than as an integral part of the full menu of educational offerings. The segment is the most open to online education and sees very few inherent barriers to future adoption. This population will be familiar to institutions as the original group that online education grew to serve.
  • Parents in this segment are particularly hesitant to recommend online education for their children
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  • due to what they perceive as its reputation for generating poor employment prospects.
  • These students place a unique emphasis on the experiential, social, and emotional benefits of education
  • college is critical to emotional and character development. Perhaps surprisingly, it does not matter greatly to them which form their education takes, so long as they achieve their goal of a degree for personal and social advancement.
  • Members of this segment are motivated primarily by the financial outcomes of an education. They want to achieve an acceptable return on their investment, get a better job, and make more money. They view an education much more as a transaction than as an experience.
  • Members of this segment will become True Believers if the online experience meets their high standards and offers benefits beyond those of traditional classrooms, such as greater interactivity with professors and peers.
  • As its members increasingly get what they want from online and blended classrooms, they will become the primary source of supply for existing and emerging segments of online enthusiasts.
Nigel Coutts

Educators as Agents for Educational Policy - The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    Education exists in an uneasy domain and the teaching professional is forced to navigate between a multitude of conflicting tensions. Our Education systems are dominated by abundance of voices all shouting for attention and offering a solution to the problems they have diagnosed. Each individual claims expertise and insights gained from years as a student is sufficient experience to allow one to speak with authority. - Educators need to find their voice. 
Nigel Coutts

Local Wisdom versus Global Assessments - The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    A significant shift continues to occur within global education markets. It is signified by the manner in which it makes sense to speak of a global education market. It is driven by neo-liberalism and the expansion of markets into all aspects of our lives and it is made possible by manipulation of the third messaging system within the educational triad of curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. It is a drive towards accountable, comparable and productive education systems fine-tuned to maximise the return on investment and provide industry with the workforce it desires. What must be asked is how does this trend impact students and are these the forces that should be driving change in our education systems?
Nigel Coutts

Educational Disadvantage - Socio-economic Status and Education Pt 2 - The Learner's Way - 1 views

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    An unavoidable element of the discourse around educational disadvantage or equality is how we define and assess equality. One definition will see this as being in equality of access to education, funding for education and/or resources. Such an approach has largely been seen in government funding models however subtle variations on this theme have resulted in significant differences in resulting policies.
Dennis OConnor

SchoolTube - About Us - 0 views

  • Sign Up... It's Free! | Login Home Videos Channels Categories Educators Contests Partners Store Games About Us A Few Words About SchoolTube SchoolTube provides students and educators a safe, world class, and FREE media sharing website that is nationally endorsed by premier education associations. SchoolTube is the recognized leader for moderated, internet media sharing for teachers and students. All student created materials on SchoolTube must be approved by registered teachers, follow local school guidelines, and adhere to our high standards.
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    SchoolTube Logo Sign Up... It's Free! | Login Home Videos Channels Categories Educators Contests Partners Store Games About Us A Few Words About SchoolTube SchoolTube provides students and educators a safe, world class, and FREE media sharing website that is nationally endorsed by premier education associations. SchoolTube is the recognized leader for moderated, internet media sharing for teachers and students. All student created materials on SchoolTube must be approved by registered teachers, follow local school guidelines, and adhere to our high standards.
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