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Contents contributed and discussions participated by Helena Grant

Helena Grant

An ASCD Study Guide for Teaching Every Student in the Digital Age: Universal Design for... - 0 views

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    Some interesting and thought provoking questions below the book description
Helena Grant

Google Apps Marketplace - RCampus ePortfolios - 2 views

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    Another way of creating ePortfolios!
Helena Grant

Technology Impact on Learning - 1 views

shared by Helena Grant on 12 Mar 11 - Cached
  • Multiple Intelligences and Multi-media Howard Gardner, Professor of Harvard University and author of Frames of Mind (New York: Basic Books, 1983) from Multimedia Book, ITTE wrote that: Seven or more "multiple intelligences" that are of equal importance in human beings and develop at different times and in different ways in different individuals. Multi-media can go along way to addressing these intelligences, much more than traditional teaching methods. Below is a list of the intelligences and the technology tools that can be used to teach to them Verbal/Linguistic intelligence: The ability to think, communicate, and create through words both in speech and in writing. Computer software which allows young children to write and illustrate their own stories before their fine motor skills are developed enough to allow them to do so by hand. Word processing software stimulates learners to interact more closely with their work. Audio and video recording can give students instant feedback on their story-telling skills and can help them develop them further. Multimedia software helps students produce multimedia reports. Telecommunications programs link students who correspond in writing. Logical/mathematical intelligences: Memorize and perform mathematical operations, ability to think mathematically, logically, and analytically and to apply that understanding to problem solving. Multimedia products that graphically illustrate physics concepts. Providing challenging visual/spatial tasks which develop mathematical and logical thinking . Develop higher-order mathematical thinking by making abstract ideas concrete. Visual/spatial intelligence: The ability to understand the world through what we see and imagine and to express ideas through the graphic arts. "Paint" programs that allow students who are unskilled with paper and brush create art on computer screens. Databases of art work. Desktop publishing. Camcorders to create documentaries. Internet links to museums and virtual tours. Bodily/kinesthetic intelligence: The ability to learn through physical coordination and dexterity and the ability to express oneself through physical activities. Educational games which challenge fine motor coordination while developing logical thinking skills and mastery over abstractions. Construction of lego robots and program their movement through the computer. Electronic fieldtrips - programs that allow students to interact electronically with a scientist who is exploring the depths of the Mediterranean or the inside of a volcano. Musical intelligence: The ability to understand, appreciate, perform, and create music by voice or instruments or dance. Students can hum into a synthesizer and make it sound like any instrument they want. Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) makes it possible to make music on an electronic keyboard, which can be made to sound like any instrument and then can be orchestrated electronically. Interactive presentations of renowned classical music let students understand music on many different levels; listening to it, seeing the score as it is played, hearing individual instruments played alone, reviewing biographical material about the composer and learning about the music’s historical and cultural backgrounds.
  • Is technology making an impact on education? "Technology is making a significant, positive impact on education. Important findings in these studies include: Educational technology as demonstrated a significant positive effect on achievement. Positive effects have been found for all major subject areas, in preschool through higher education, and for both regular education and special needs students. Evidence suggests that interactive video is especially effective when the skills and concepts to be learned have a visual component and when the software incorporates a research-based instructional design. Use of online telecommunications for collaboration across classrooms in different geographic locations has also been show to improve academic skills. Education technology has been found to have positive effects on student attitudes toward learning and on student self-concept. Students felt more successful in school, were more motivated to learn and have increased self-confidence and self-esteem when using computer-based instruction. This was particularly true when the technology allowed learners to control their own learning. The level of effectiveness of educational technology is influenced by the specific student population, the software design, the teacher’s role, how the students are grouped, and the level of student access to the technology. Students trained in collaborative learning, had higher self esteem and student achievement. Introducing technology into the learning environment has been shown to make learning more student-centered, to encourage cooperative learning, and to stimulate increased teacher/student interaction. Positive changes in the learning environment brought about by technology are more evolutionary than revolutionary. These changes occur over a period of years, as teachers become more experienced with technology. Courses for which computer-based networks were use increased student-student and student-teacher interaction, increased student-teacher interaction with lower-performing students, and did not decrease the traditional forms of communication used. Many student who seldom participate in face-to-face class discussion become more active participants online. Greater student cooperation and sharing and helping behaviors occurred when students used computer-based learning that had students compete against the computer rather than against each other. Small group collaboration on computer is especially effective when student have received training in the collaborative process.
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    This is quite an old article, but fits with some of the discussions recently about if and how technology has an effect on learning. I've highlighted 2 sections.
Helena Grant

FlockDraw - A Free, Collaborative group whiteboard - 2 views

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    I like the idea of being able to collaboratively draw - to use for drawing diagrams and asking students to label, add on, cut in half etc. But, I can't tell if you can keep your drawing private. Need to investigate further.
Helena Grant

Tate Schools and Teachers - Tate Tools - 0 views

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    Tate Gallery online resource pages. Variety of activities for different age groups. Fantastic as a research, art history, history, geography, literacy stimulus, craft project ideas. Compare and contrast, promoting ideas, self and general perceptions.
Helena Grant

Publication Network - Youblisher.com - turn pages / flippable pdfs - pdf's zu... - 3 views

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    A way of creating a book online and when you look at the finished product on screen you can turn the pages like a real book. Cool element will really appeal to younger students and creating your own book can be a positive way of encouraging children to write stories, change a story ending, add in illustrations to enhance words, encourage reading aloud. Cross curricula.
Helena Grant

Museum Box Homepage - 1 views

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    A fun site where students can either create their own boxes of information crossing over into just about any curriculum area in order to build an argument, present information, debate different aspects or search for information in boxes available to share on the site. Great for stimulating speech and language development and differentiation made easier as a perfect tool for poor readers.
Helena Grant

Add your voice to presentations, share online, and track viewing | myBrainshark - 0 views

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    AA tool that allows you to add voice overs to powerpoint, videos, photo albums and text documents. Brilliant as a stimulus cross curricula: record immediate reactions to pA tool that allows you to add voice overs to powerpoint, videos, photo albums and text documents. Brilliant as a stimulus cross curricula: record immediate reactions to pictures, verbal teacher feedback on a text based assignment, develop presentations with voice over instructions to assist younger or less literate students, narrating a photo album excellent practice for second language practice. ictures, verbal teacher feedback on a text based assignment, develop presentations with voice over instructions to assist younger or less literate students, narrating a photo album excellent practice for second language practice. dd a Group Comment
Helena Grant

kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory ... - 2 views

  • Knowing a person's (and your own) learning style enables learning to be orientated according to the preferred method. That said, everyone responds to and needs the stimulus of all types of learning styles to one extent or another - it's a matter of using emphasis that fits best with the given situation and a person's learning style preferences. Here are brief descriptions of the four Kolb learning styles: Diverging (feeling and watching - CE/RO) - These people are able to look at things from different perspectives. They are sensitive. They prefer to watch rather than do, tending to gather information and use imagination to solve problems. They are best at viewing concrete situations several different viewpoints. Kolb called this style 'Diverging' because these people perform better in situations that require ideas-generation, for example, brainstorming. People with a Diverging learning style have broad cultural interests and like to gather information. They are interested in people, tend to be imaginative and emotional, and tend to be strong in the arts. People with the Diverging style prefer to work in groups, to listen with an open mind and to receive personal feedback. Assimilating (watching and thinking - AC/RO) - The Assimilating learning preference is for a concise, logical approach. Ideas and concepts are more important than people. These people require good clear explanation rather than practical opportunity. They excel at understanding wide-ranging information and organising it a clear logical format. People with an Assimilating learning style are less focused on people and more interested in ideas and abstract concepts. People with this style are more attracted to logically sound theories than approaches based on practical value. These learning style people is important for effectiveness in information and science careers. In formal learning situations, people with this style prefer readings, lectures, exploring analytical models, and having time to think things through. Converging (doing and thinking - AC/AE) - People with a Converging learning style can solve problems and will use their learning to find solutions to practical issues. They prefer technical tasks, and are less concerned with people and interpersonal aspects. People with a Converging learning style are best at finding practical uses for ideas and theories. They can solve problems and make decisions by finding solutions to questions and problems. People with a Converging learning style are more attracted to technical tasks and problems than social or interpersonal issues. A Converging learning style enables specialist and technology abilities. People with a Converging style like to experiment with new ideas, to simulate, and to work with practical applications. Accommodating (doing and feeling - CE/AE) - The Accommodating learning style is 'hands-on', and relies on intuition rather than logic. These people use other people's analysis, and prefer to take a practical, experiential approach. They are attracted to new challenges and experiences, and to carrying out plans. They commonly act on 'gut' instinct rather than logical analysis. People with an Accommodating learning style will tend to rely on others for information than carry out their own analysis. This learning style is prevalent and useful in roles requiring action and initiative. People with an Accommodating learning style prefer to work in teams to complete tasks. They set targets and actively work in the field trying different ways to achieve an objective.  
  • As with any behavioural model, this is a guide not a strict set of rules.
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    For Tom - learning styles. From Helena
Helena Grant

Online Assessment Strategies and Models - 0 views

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    Josh - following up on your questions about assessment online. I found this website and there are some interesting ideas here. Not specific for language teaching, but some of them could be adapted. Cheers, Helena
Helena Grant

Moodle 1.9 for Teaching 7-14 Year Olds: Beginner's Guide Book & eBook | Packt Publishin... - 0 views

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    Has anyone read this book? Are there any others in the group who are looking to use Moodle for this age group?
Helena Grant

Education Products for Schools: Web Design, CMS, Moodle VLE and more | Webanywhere - 0 views

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    UK based 'webanywhere' company promoting education web applications
Helena Grant

Primary School Moodle VLE - SchoolAnywhere | Schoolanywhere - 0 views

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    How primary schools in the UK are using Moodle
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