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Sarah Oliver

Transportation Alternatives: T.A. Magazine Article: Provocateur: The Sacred "Rac" - 1 views

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    November/December 1997, p.2An Indian anthropologist, Chandra Thapar, made a study of foreign cultures which had customs similar to those of his native land. One culture in particular fascinated him because it reveres one animal as sacred, much as the people in India revere the cow. This article is to provoke thought in students about the way we view other cultures beliefs and customs. The 'arc' is a car, and the foreign culture is the USA.
Jodie Bramel

Critical Evaluation - Kathy Schrock's Guide to Everything - 7 views

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    Critical Evaluation Information for all learners
Rick Patterson

Jun05_02 - 8 views

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    Critical Thinking is a question that comes up in many of the online classes I've attended, this is a very good article explaining some strategies that may be used
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    Thank you Rick! (Rick is a participant in our Summer 2012 E-Learning Practicum.)
Debi Griggs

Critical Friends: A Novel Approach to Improving Peer and Instructor Feedback | Faculty ... - 3 views

  • We have observed that the skill of giving peer feedback requires instructor scaffolding and cultivation
  • One of the key questions on the student course evaluation inquires whether the instructor’s feedback provided assistance in improving the quality of assignments
  • Cultivating a learning environment where receiving critical feedback is invited and well received enhances the level of learning that is experienced in a class.
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    Using peer and instructor feedback in developing quality assignments
Debra Kane

The Critical Thinking Community - 2 views

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    "Critical thinking is the intellectually disciplined process of actively and skillfully conceptualizing, applying, analyzing, synthesizing, and/or evaluating information gathered from, or generated by, observation, experience, reflection, reasoning, or communication as a guide to belief and action. In its exemplary form, it is based on universal intellectual values that transcend subject matter divisions: clarity, accuracy, precision, consistency, relevance, sound evidence, good reasons, depth, breadth, and fairness" (Scriven and Paul, National Council for Excellence in Critical Thinking Instruction)
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    Hi Debra,

    This is a great website that some of us at my school have been looking at over the last decade. We use the classroom posters and like the way the materials focus on analyzing the parts of the thinking, evaluating thinking with the universal intellectual standards and developing thinking dispositions (and how they are all interconnected). We've used readings from the textbooks and mini-guides with our students extensively. I've considered attending the annual conference or signing up for their online course but have yet to do so. My only criticism is a lot of their material is repackaged under different names and books. However, that wouldn't stop me form giving this a 5-star rating. They even have material translated into Thai which my students in Lao can read if their English isn't strong enough to grasp all the important concepts. Thanks for recommending it!
Margot Laird

Innovative Educators - 0 views

  • Innovative Educators is dedicated to providing superior training sessions focused on the most critical and relevant issues facing educators today. Our primary goal is to provide participants with the information, training and skills necessary to immediately implement positive change at their institutions.
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    Innovative Educators is dedicated to providing superior training sessions focused on the most critical and relevant issues facing educators today. Our primary goal is to provide participants with the information, training and skills necessary to immediately implement positive change at their institutions.
Anna Gilboy

Teachable Moment - About Us - 0 views


  • About TeachableMoment.Org


    TeachableMoment.Org provides educators with timely teaching ideas to encourage critical thinking on issues of the day and foster a positive classroom environment. It is a project of Morningside Center for Teaching Social Responsibility (formerly Educators for Social Responsibility Metropolitan Area).

Gini Wurtzel

Faculty Driven Assessment of Critical Thinking: National Dissemination of the CAT Instr... - 0 views

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    "Abstract- This paper reports the latest findings of a project to nationally disseminate the CAT© instrument, a unique interdisciplinary assessment tool for evaluating students' critical thinking skills."\nCAT is the Critical Thinking Assessment Test, a short essay instrument used to measure critical thinking. It is a standardized tool, but uses local faculty to score the essays.
Shandana Said

6 types of Socratic Questions - 0 views

  • Critical thinking is the process we use to reflect on, access and judge the assumptions underlying our own and others ideas and actions.
  • Socratic questioning is at the heart of critical thinking
    • Shandana Said
       
      This site offers good examples of each type of Socratic question.
  • Questions for clarification:
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  • Questions that probe assumptions:
  • Questions that probe reasons and evidence:
  • Questions about Viewpoints and Perspectives:
  • Questions that probe implications and consequences:
  • Questions about the question:
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    This site is a good reference to remember the types of Socratic Questions there are. Teachers can use a range of such questions to inspire critical thinking.
Margaret Mulqueen

YouTube - Building knowledge: constructivism in learning - 0 views

    • Margaret Mulqueen
       
      Great information on constructivism and its definition, and how it ties in with critical thinking.
Margaret Mulqueen

YouTube - Critical Thinking - 1 views

    • Margaret Mulqueen
       
      This video is a great reinforcement of what is critical thinking. Students would benefit from this visuals.
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    This video discusses critical thinking, its definitions, and has great visuals.
Margaret Mulqueen

CriticalThinking.org - Critical Thinking Model 1 - 0 views

    • Margaret Mulqueen
       
      This gives great definitions and questions for critical thinking. Make sure to let your cursor rest on each section of the chart because the definitions and questions will change in the righthand boxes.
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    CT chart
Margaret Mulqueen

Critical Thinking Definition - 0 views

    • Margaret Mulqueen
       
      Great listing of characterisitcs of a critical thinker. In the next section, they are broken down more.
    • Margaret Mulqueen
       
      This is a great list of characterisitics of a critical thinker.
  • . Is open-minded and mindful of alternatives
    2. Tries to be well-informed
    3. Judges well the credibility of sources
    4. Identifies conclusions, reasons, and assumptions
    5. Judges well the quality of an argument, including the acceptability of its reasons, assumptions, and evidence
    6. Can well develop and defend a reasonable position
    7. Asks appropriate clarifying questions
    8. Formulates plausible hypotheses; plans experiments well
    9. Defines terms in a way appropriate for the context
    10. Draws conclusions when warranted, but with caution
    11. Integrates all items in this list when deciding what to believe or do
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  • Seek alternative hypotheses, explanations, conclusions, plans, sources, etc., and be open to them
    • Margaret Mulqueen
       
      Once again, repeating the idea of reflection to signify growth of thinking.
  • e. Be reflectively aware of their own basic beliefs
  • Be concerned about others' welfare
    • Margaret Mulqueen
       
      This is an area many high school students have problems figuring out. What makes a source credible?
  • Ideal critical thinkers have the ability to
  • . Judge the credibility of a source. M
    • Margaret Mulqueen
       
      This is a great breakdown of argument, and understanding how one can break an argument down.
  • efine terms and judge definitions. Three dimensions are form, strategy, and content.
  • Consider and reason from premises, reasons, assumptions, positions, and other propositions with which they disagree or about which they are in doubt -- without letting the disagreement or doubt interfere with their thinking ("suppositional thinking")
    • Margaret Mulqueen
       
      A listing of great thinkers and how they define critical thinking.
    • Margaret Mulqueen
       
      This is a great list of critical thinkers and how they define critical thinking.
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    This website gives a break down of critical thinking, its qualities, and how one can use it.
Margaret Mulqueen

Taxonomy of Socratic Questions - 0 views

    • Margaret Mulqueen
       
      This gives teachers a template that they can share with students on how to ask higher order thinking questions in the classroom.
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    Handout on how to ask questions
Carol Hartmann

A Critical Look at Constructivist Pedagogy - Kevin Blissett: Out of the Cave - 1 views

  • I actively search out opposing points of view. My best guess, as usual, is that the truth lies somewhere in the middle. That is, I believe that novice learners need substantial guidance but also a decent dose of inquiry. As learners become more mature and establish a suitable context of knowledge and skills, inquiry can begin to take a  more central role in instruction until finally it takes the dominant role.
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    Blog article 5/30/09 titled: A Critical Look at Constructivist Pedagogy present background reading about pros and cons. Kevin's Blogroll and Links offer transformative browsing and reading from a global perspective.
Rachel Stenson

An Introduction to Critical Thinking - 0 views

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    "Life can be described as a sequence of problems that each individual must solve for one's self. Critical thinking skills are nothing more than problem solving skills that result in reliable knowledge"
cc omalley

Walker TRC-Critical Thinking - 0 views

  • Wade (1995) identifies 8 characteristics of critical thinking. Critical thinking involves asking questions, defining a problem, examining evidence, analyzing assumptions and biases, avoiding emotional reasoning, avoiding oversimplification, considering other interpretations, and tolerating ambiguity. Dealing with ambiguity is also seen by Strohm & Baukus (1995) as an essential part of critical thinking, "Ambiguity and doubt serve a critical-thinking function and are a necessary and even a productive part of the process" (p. 56).
  • Through technology, the amount of information available today is massive. This infomation explosion is likely to continue in the future. Students need a guide to weed through the information and not just passively accept it. Students need to "develop and effectively apply critical thinking skills to their academic studies, to the complex problems that they will face, and to the critical choices they will be forced to make as a result of the information explosion and other rapid technological changes" (Oliver & Utermohlen, p. 1 ).
  • Dialogues: Robertson and Rane-Szostak (1996) identify two methods of stimulating useful discussions in the classroom:
  • Written dialogues: Give students written dialogues to analyze. In small groups, students must identify the different viewpoints of each participant in the dialogue. Must look for biases, presence or exclusion of important evidence, alternative interpretations, misstatement of facts, and errors in reasoning. Each group must decide which view is the most reasonable. After coming to a conclusion, each group acts out their dialogue and explains their analysis of it.
  • Spontaneous Group Dialogue: One group of students are assigned roles to play in a discussion (such as leader, information giver, opinion seeker, and disagreer). Four observer groups are formed with the functions of determining what roles are being played by whom, identifying biases and errors in thinking, evaluating reasoning skills, and examining ethical implications of the content.
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  • CATS (Classroom Assessment Techniques): Angelo stresses the use of ongoing classroom assessment as a way to monitor and facilitate students' critical thinking. An example of a CAT is to ask students to write a "Minute Paper" responding to questions such as "What was the most important thing you learned in today's class? What question related to this session remains uppermost in your mind?" The teacher selects some of the papers and prepares responses for the next class meeting.
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      This is a wonderful resource from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga that helps define critical thinking. It includes eight characteristics of critical thinking, a rationale for teaching it, and strategies for promoting related skills.
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      Wade (1995) identifies 8 characteristics of critical thinking. Critical thinking involves asking questions, defining a problem, examining evidence, analyzing assumptions and biases, avoiding emotional reasoning, avoiding oversimplification, considering other interpretations, and tolerating ambiguity. Dealing with ambiguity is also seen by Strohm & Baukus (1995) as an essential part of critical thinking, "Ambiguity and doubt serve a critical-thinking function and are a necessary and even a productive part of the process" (p. 56).
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      definitions and characteristics of critical thinking to make transparent to students what we mean when we tell them to do higher order thinking
    Tracey Stockel

    CriticalThinking.org - Critical Thinking: Where to Begin - 0 views

    • "Critical thinking is self-guided, self-disciplined thinking which attempts to reason at the highest level of quality in a fair-minded way.
    • The Problem:
      Everyone thinks; it is our nature to do so. But much of our thinking, left to itself, is biased, distorted, partial, uninformed or down-right prejudiced. Yet the quality of our life and that of what we produce, make, or build depends precisely on the quality of our thought. Shoddy thinking is costly, both in money and in quality of life. Excellence in thought, however, must be systematically cultivated.
    • A Definition:
      Critical thinking is the art of analyzing and evaluating thinking with a view to improving it.
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    • While most critical thinking concepts are intuitive, to integrate and apply these concepts consistently and rationally takes concerted effort, study and reflection.
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      Some beginning thoughts about just what critical thinking is. This is one page from The Critical Thinking Community: Foundation for Critical Thinking. Searching the many pages of this website will yield many valuable ideas.
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