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Peter Beens

Education Week Teacher: Teaching Secrets: Communicating With Parents - 1 views

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    Teaching Secrets: Communicating With Parents By Gail Tillery Premium article access courtesy of TeacherMagazine.org. You will face many challenging tasks as a new teacher. Dealing with parents is probably among the most intimidating, especially if you are young and in your first career. While communicating with parents can be tricky, a little preparation will help you to treat parents as partners and to be calmer when problems arise. Here's the first rule to live by: Your students' parents are not your enemies. Ultimately, they want the same thing you want, which is the best for their children. By maintaining respectful and productive communication, you can work together to help students succeed. Second, whenever problems arise, remember that parents are probably just as nervous about contacting you as you are about returning the contact-and maybe more so. I'll confess: Even after 26 years of teaching, I still get a little frisson of fear in my belly when I see an e-mail or hear a voicemail from a parent. But I have seen time and again that parents are often more nervous than the teacher is-especially if their child doesn't want them to contact the teacher. Indeed, some parents may even fear that if they raise concerns, their child will face some kind of retaliation. Remember that parents' tones or words may reflect such fears. In your response, try to establish that everyone involved wants to help the child. Here are some practical tips for communicating effectively with parents: Contact every parent at the beginning of the year. Do some "recon." Telephone calls are best for this initial contact, since they are more personal than e-mail. Ask the parent to tell you about his or her child's strengths, weaknesses, likes, dislikes, etc. Make sure to ask, "What is the best thing I can do to help your child succeed?" Remember to take notes! Once you've gathered the information you need, set a boundary with parents by saying, "Well, Ms. Smith, I have 25 more parent
Phil Taylor

Education 2.0 - Edmodo - Free Private Microblogging For Education - 28 views

  • strong and growing. Thank you!

    Mrs. Smokorowski

    Middle School Teacher
    Andover, Kansas

     
    • Kalin Wilburn
       
      If you are fearful of Facebook and MySpace then you need to create an Edmodo account. Edmodo was designed specifically for educational purposes. You must be a teacher, student, or parent to gain access. It allows you all the amenities of those other social networking sites but with a lot more security/privacy.
    • Maryalice Kilbourne
       
      You are so right. I already love edmodo!
    • Denise Krefting
       
      Is it COPPA Compliant?
    • Luv2ride
       
      I've used Edmodo for 3 years now. It has revolutionized my teaching to the degree that I don't know what I'll do if I ever have to stop using it.
    • Herb Schulte
       
      That is great question. And do you need parent permission for students to use it?
    • Jordan Moody
       
      Is it free?
    • Gil Anspacher
       
      Yes, it is free and you can manage student accounts. It is only open to those you invite in and only educators may obtain an account. You may monitor and moderate all conversations, administer quizes, embed media, etc. The groups feature is very effective and you may grant access to your group to other classes. We just had 700+ students interacting in a global collaboration project, Digiteen. Students do not need an email address to use Edmodo, so under 13 is OK for CIPA. It looks much like Facebook, so kids love it and parents need some education on it as they fear it at first. Parents can get monitoring access so they may monitor their child's activity. It is a great tool to show parents how social media is used in education.
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    Social networking for teachers & students. Send homework, links, videos, participate in discussions, share ideas.
Josh Flores

TODAYMoms - Should parents be blamed when kids fail at school? - 106 views

    • Josh Flores
       
      Who the heck would click "NO"???
    • Josh Flores
       
      Parents should be held accountable, teachers should be held accountable AND students should be held accountable.
    • Josh Flores
       
      from Lynn Jones (to me?) "How many children do you have? I am an educator and I have 6 children who are all different. My second child, a son, was never told to study, never had a spelling word called out to him, and strieved to make all A's and B's since the 2nd grade. His older brother with an IQ of 128 in the 5th grade didn't care about grades and passing. His younger brother almost graduated high school before him even though they were 3 years apart in age. The oldest son has ADHD. His grandmother was a math teacher and I am a math teacher, but yet that was the subject he failed almost each year and had to go to summer school. He had the same parents and the same environment as his younger brother, but he was lacking the drive that is born in you. I won't go into the differences of the other 4 just to say that the good Lord gifted me with 3 ADHD children when not much was known about it (the oldest is 44). Every child is different and parents must learn not to judge one by the others, just like teachers must not assume that about siblings they teach. A parent can be their to help and try to point them in the right direction with the right work ethics in school, but the bottom line is how much the child cares and wants to achieve. The envolved parent can help the child that sits on the fence and can go on either side, but the ultimate choice is going to be the child's. It is the same with church. You can take the child to church every Sunday, but when they get older it is their decision how to direct their life. I am not saying that a parent shouldn't try every day to give the guidance their children need and deserve, but you can't beat yourself up when things don't go the way you think they should. All a parent can do is standby their child and give them all the love they can and to know that sometimes that is not enough for the child."
    • Josh Flores
       
      My Reply to Lynn Jones: 1. Parents should be held accountable along with teachers and the students themselves. 2. Six kids????? You are a saint! I plan on having two at the most and pray to the gods they're not girls! 3. Is there a specific reason you sent me your family history?
    • Josh Flores
       
      From Lynn: "I sent you the history to show that no two children are alike and not to judge one child by the behavior of another. In education we teach all types and there is no one way to approach all children. Sometimes it is not the parent that can make a difference, but someone else and not always a teacher."
    • Josh Flores
       
      I don't think the article is about differentiation but sure, I'm confident it's in the back of any high quality educator's mind. Regardless, we can always do more than standby our kids. 
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    How many children do you have? I am an educator and I have 6 children who are all different. My second child, a son, was never told to study, never had a spelling word called out to him, and strieved to make all A's and B's since the 2nd grade. His older brother with an IQ of 128 in the 5th grade didn't care about grades and passing. His younger brother almost graduated high school before him even though they were 3 years apart in age. The oldest son has ADHD. His grandmother was a math teacher and I am a math teacher, but yet that was the subject he failed almost each year and had to go to summer school. He had the same parents and the same environment as his younger brother, but he was lacking the drive that is born in you. I won't go into the differences of the other 4 just to say that the good Lord gifted me with 3 ADHD children when not much was known about it (the oldest is 44). Every child is different and parents must learn not to judge one by the others, just like teachers must not assume that about siblings they teach. A parent can be their to help and try to point them in the right direction with the right work ethics in school, but the bottom line is how much the child cares and wants to achieve. The envolved parent can help the child that sits on the fence and can go on either side, but the ultimate choice is going to be the child's. It is the same with church. You can take the child to church every Sunday, but when they get older it is their decision how to direct their life. I am not saying that a parent shouldn't try every day to give the guidance their children need and deserve, but you can't beat yourself up when things don't go the way you think they should. All a parent can do is standby their child and give them all the love they can and to know that sometimes that is not enough for the child.
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    I sent you the history to show that no two children are alike and not to judge one child by the behavior of another. In education we teach all types and there is no one way to approach all children. Sometimes it is not the parent that can make a difference, but someone else and not always a teacher.
Roland Gesthuizen

UK Study: Parents, Not Teachers, Key to Education | Education News - 79 views

  • Children are influenced by everything around them, the way their parents act, what their parents say and do, and increasingly as they spend more time ‘with’ celebrity figures how these role models act.
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    A study by the Royal Economic Society, to be presented this week, finds that parental effect on test results is five times that of teachers' influence. This comes in the wake of warnings by Sir Michael Wilshaw last week that teachers were unable to properly do their own jobs because parents were expecting them to cover their own parenting skill shortfalls and to become surrogate family for the students.
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    It all happens well before school comes into the equation. If a child grows up in a literature rich, engaging environment with adults that spend quality time giving opportunities for great learning experiences in the world, the worst teachers still can't decoy that child's enthusiasm for learning. He can always learn at home. But if the child grows up neglected, not nurtured with rich learning experiences ( and I'm not talking about helicopter parents spending every waking moment ramming study down their throats - just quality conversation and hands on experiences )l doesn't get read to or taken out to shop, teachers are fighting an uphill battle with a disengaged individual. Parents, don't wait for school teachers to teach your kids. Start straight away..
Lisa C. Hurst

Inside the School Silicon Valley Thinks Will Save Education | WIRED - 9 views

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    "AUTHOR: ISSIE LAPOWSKY. ISSIE LAPOWSKY DATE OF PUBLICATION: 05.04.15. 05.04.15 TIME OF PUBLICATION: 7:00 AM. 7:00 AM INSIDE THE SCHOOL SILICON VALLEY THINKS WILL SAVE EDUCATION Click to Open Overlay Gallery Students in the youngest class at the Fort Mason AltSchool help their teacher, Jennifer Aguilar, compile a list of what they know and what they want to know about butterflies. CHRISTIE HEMM KLOK/WIRED SO YOU'RE A parent, thinking about sending your 7-year-old to this rogue startup of a school you heard about from your friend's neighbor's sister. It's prospective parent information day, and you make the trek to San Francisco's South of Market neighborhood. You walk up to the second floor of the school, file into a glass-walled conference room overlooking a classroom, and take a seat alongside dozens of other parents who, like you, feel that public schools-with their endless bubble-filled tests, 38-kid classrooms, and antiquated approach to learning-just aren't cutting it. At the same time, you're thinking: this school is kind of weird. On one side of the glass is a cheery little scene, with two teachers leading two different middle school lessons on opposite ends of the room. But on the other side is something altogether unusual: an airy and open office with vaulted ceilings, sunlight streaming onto low-slung couches, and rows of hoodie-wearing employees typing away on their computers while munching on free snacks from the kitchen. And while you can't quite be sure, you think that might be a robot on wheels roaming about. Then there's the guy who's standing at the front of the conference room, the school's founder. Dressed in the San Francisco standard issue t-shirt and jeans, he's unlike any school administrator you've ever met. But the more he talks about how this school uses technology to enhance and individualize education, the more you start to like what he has to say. And so, if you are truly fed up with the school stat
Mr. Carver

SecEd | Features | Teaching parents technology - 0 views

  • A survey by Becta found that 95 per cent of parents think that the effective use of technology can help their children to learn, while 77 per cent of parents think that using technology well can help engage their children in difficult subjects. Parents are the key to achievement.
  • parental involvement diminishes as the child gets older. While this is a natural part of growing up, parents can continue to play a strong role in their child’s education and development at school and it has been shown that this has a significant impact on attainment
  • online reporting
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • online reporting:
  • By making it as easy as possible to see information about their child, it can encourage some parents to become more involved, and by changing the attitudes of parents, the whole school can benefit.
  • joined forces with the North East e-Learning Foundation to develop a Computers in Homes scheme.
  • Members of the local community can now visit the school’s drop-in cyber cafe and music recording studio after school, at weekends and during the holidays.
  • ‘wireless cloud’, providing blanket internet connectivity to the local area
  • Parents are rightly concerned about e-safety. The best way to protect children is to teach them how to use the internet safely.
  • they have also set up a Saturday morning club.
Carol Mortensen

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Association - Is your child or loved one at risk for Sudden Cardiac Arrest SCA? - 0 views

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    The loss of many of our young students and athelets is due to this. Please take a minute and read. "This form will help you identify those who may be at risk and who will benefit from additional testing to look for conditions that cause SCA. The HCMA offers the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Risk Assessment Form, SCARAF, This form should be distributed to all school age children and families. This 2- page form has the AHA 12 point items addressed and written in a manner that a parent is more likely to provide as clinically relevant data to a physician. This document was created with the assistance of Dr. Robert Campbell and the HCMA. It offers 3 options Yes - No - Unsure. Should the parent/you answers Yes or Unsure to any question they are offered 3 steps to follow: 1. Bring this form to your personal physician and discuss cardiac screening. 2. Seek an evaluation from a cardiac professional including appropriate testing (ECG, echocardiogram and additional if warrented) and consultation. 3. Share this information with your family. This tool creates a clinical indication for testing should the parent identify a risk factor; therefore, the clinical evaluation and testing should be covered by all major insurance programs in the USA. This tool also has the power to move beyond the child and to the parent as it is far more common to see a death under the age of 54 and over the age of 24, therefore the parents are at a similar risk as the child."
Amy Roediger

How About Better Parents? - NYTimes.com - 97 views

  • “Fifteen-year-old students whose parents often read books with them during their first year of primary school show markedly higher scores in PISA 2009 than students whose parents read with them infrequently or not at all. The performance advantage among students whose parents read to them in their early school years is evident regardless of the family’s socioeconomic background. Parents’ engagement with their 15-year-olds is strongly associated with better performance in PISA.”
    • Kate Pok
       
      I'm sure something we all already all knew...but it's nice when someone else acknowledges it.
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    Thomas Friedman commenting on new PISA study that shows parental involvement in early years impacts student performance.
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    A great article about the power of great parenting!
Martin Burrett

Time parents spend with children key to academic success - 12 views

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    "The time parents spend with their children has a powerful effect on their educational achievement, according to a large study with a novel approach. Researchers analysed data on children in Israel who lost a parent through death or divorce. They found that when it came to one measure of a child's academic success, the educational attainment of the surviving or custodial parent had more impact than the educational level of the parent who died or left the home."
MaryLiz Jones

5 Things Parents Wish Teachers Knew for Parent-Teacher Conferences - 159 views

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    Important  reminders and things to consider when visiting with parents.
Martin Burrett

Classroom friendships may offset effects of punitive parents - 4 views

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    "Angry, threatening and highly critical parenting is more likely to result in children with defiant, noncompliant and revengeful behaviour that spills over to adulthood and impacts relationships with all authority figures. Now a study by researchers at UC San Francisco has confirmed this link and found that kindergarten may provide a unique opportunity for these harshly parented children to retool negative behaviour. The study is published in the journal Development and Psychopathology on Nov. 21, 2018. In the study, the researchers looked at 338 kindergartners in six public schools in the San Francisco Bay Area. They found that 10 percent of the children met the criteria for the oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). Among this group, 71 percent had been exposed to high levels of harsh parenting, versus 29 percent who had been raised with lower levels of harsh parenting."
Martin Burrett

School librarians helping children become independent learners with parental support by @elizabethutch - UKEdChat - 13 views

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    "As a parent, I have always been able to help my children find good sources of information in order to do their homework. How do I know where to find the best information? Do I have some inside knowledge that most parents don't? Yes! How? I am a librarian… I have long believed that if parents knew about the resources available from their school library to support their children's homework they would be relieved and happy. They would be able to guide them to use these good tools without worrying about quality or reliability. Many of our resources go unused for two reasons, firstly, many teachers and students do not know about these resources, how easy they are to use and reference and secondly, parents don't know they exist."
Martin Burrett

Parents' maths skills 'rub off' on their children - 17 views

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    Parents who excel at maths produce children who excel at maths. This is according to a recently released University of Pittsburgh study, which shows a distinct transfer of math skills from parent to child. The study specifically explored intergenerational transmission-the concept of parental influence on an offspring's behaviour or psychology-in mathematic capabilities.
Roland Gesthuizen

Parent-Teacher Meetings: What Works | Parentella - 86 views

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    "As an educator in my twelfth year of teaching, I've had my share of meetings with parents. There have been Back to School Night "conferences," "junior was misbehaving, so please come meet with me" conferences, and more. There are a few things that I have found that work well with regards to the special relationship between parents and teachers."
Ryan Trauman

The Astro Banshees | Blog | Closing Argument - 0 views

shared by Ryan Trauman on 21 Apr 11 - No Cached
  • In Dennis Burgess article ‘ObesityPproblem stems from Laziness’, he adresses the root cause of obesity. Burgess claims the root of obesity to be laziness. He argues that America does not have an ‘obesity problem’, rather a ‘laziness problem’. More specifically, Burgess makes mention of the correlation between children and parents concerning obesity. ‘As a child, I would go outside and “play”. This involved getting up off the couch and exerting myself. But many of today’s children don’t participate in this type of play. And many of today’s parents sit on the couch right next to them’ (Dennis B. Burgess). Burgess makes the correlation by stating that the parents often times discourage active play by not setting the example. Parents would rather sit with their kids on the couch than take the initiative and go outside with their kids and take a walk or play ball. Parents do indeed play a role in their children’s health and ultimately have some effect on their children’s health. Healthy kids most often have healthy parents who encourage their kids good health by setting the example well and partaking in activity with their kids.
    • Ryan Trauman
       
      Excellent work here, Lizzy. You stick nice and close to the quotation that you actually introduce. Then you reflect on it some. Then you offer your own position. This is a great job.
  • Andrea Freeman addresses the issue of fast food in her article ‘Fast Food: Oppression Through Poor Nutrition.’ Freeman considers fast food in respects to low- income families. ‘Fast food has become a major source of nutrition in low- income, urban neighborhoods across the United States’ (Freeman, pg. 1). Less privelaged families must make do with their current financial situation. The easiest most convenient food source for low- income families is that of fast food. Therefore, parents have a direct effect on their children’s health.
    • Ryan Trauman
       
      This quotation is less successful. You really don't reflect on Freeman's quotation at all.
Donal O' Mahony

Let's Read Them a Story! The Parent Factor in Education…but - 35 views

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    The OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) has just published Let's Read Them a Story! The Parent Factor in Education. The document is worth looking at in its own right both as educators and as parents. I have one quibble with it - which you may read about in my blog-post. Thanks!
Mark Gleeson

21st-Century Learning Creates New Roles for Students -- and Parents | Edutopia - 104 views

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    Support for parents in learning about 21st c learning. Free download of parent guide included. 
Deborah Baillesderr

Parent Roadmaps to Common Core Standards / Parent Roadmaps- English Language Arts - 35 views

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    This is another great resource for parents on Common Core and how they can help their child in each grade. I like this one in particular because it shows parents a 3 year CCSS snap shot.
Warren Apel

5 Resources for Parent-Teacher Conferences - 50 views

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    For many educators, conferences are coming up soon, and it can be a stressful time of the school year. To help parents and educators prepare for parent-teacher conferences, we've rounded up a variety of web resources. From ideas for highlighting student progress, to questions every parent should ask, these are some of our favorite articles and resources that cover parent-teacher conferencing.
Martin Burrett

Climate education for kids increases climate concerns for parents, research finds - 5 views

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    "A new study from North Carolina State University finds that educating children about climate change increases their parents' concerns about climate change. "There's a robust body of work showing that kids can influence their parents' behavior and positions on environmental and social issues, but this is the first experimental study demonstrating that climate education for children promotes parental concern about climate change," says Danielle Lawson, lead author of a paper on the work and a Ph.D. student at NC State."
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