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Kathleen N

FamilyandConsumerSciencesFINAL9-20-07.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 2 views

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    Direct link to the curriculum document (PDF) From Delaware's DOE. Very helpful for Family and Consumer Science teachers updating curriculum in the UbD Framework
koolteecha

Pieter Bruegel - 20 views

    • koolteecha
       
      Look closely at Bruegel's poem.  Make notes about what you see - objects, geographical features, people, animals, etc.
  • Pieter Bruegel the Elder
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    You should try Poetry Genius for this. It is an amazing and growing app: http://genius.com/tags/poetry It's a place where you post your poem and your students can annotate in real-time. You can restrict it to just your class, or you can open it up to the community. They also have Literature Genius with some awesome pages (so far I have looked at Hawthorne and O'Connor--but there are a ton more http://lit.genius.com/.
Betsy Morris

WB_CE_Dig_Portfolios.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 56 views

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    A digital portfolio is a computer-based collection of student performance over time. Portfolios make classroom learning more accessible to parents, administrators, and other district support staff because they provide a window into student learning. A portfolio showcases both student achievement and student learning over time.
Leslie Grahn

A Ticket Out the Door - 3 views

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    The power of exit tickets as a formative data collection strategy
Sharin Tebo

Building Attention Span - The New York Times - 75 views

  • ou toggle over to check your phone during even the smallest pause in real life. You feel those phantom vibrations even when no one is texting you. You have trouble concentrating for long periods.
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      This is a connection for me to the technology and devices article we read today and did a quotation mingle around during our Disciplinary Literacy Institute. No kidding that we get a shot of dopamine or 'high' when our phone goes ding, or it vibrates. 
  • Online life is so delicious
  • You live in a state of perpetual anticipation because the next social encounter is just a second way.
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • xpert online gamers have a great capacity for short-term memory, to process multiple objects simultaneously, to switch flexibly between tasks and to quickly process rapidly presented information.
  • Fluid intelligence
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      I've never heard this before!
  • Research at the University of Oslo and elsewhere suggests that people read a printed page differently than they read off a screen. They are more linear, more intentional, less likely to multitask or browse for keywords.
  • Crystallized intelligence
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      Something else i have never heard of.
  • Crystallized intelligence accumulates over the years and leads ultimately to understanding and wisdom.
    • Sharin Tebo
       
      So maybe this kind of intelligence, then, is the "learning is a consequence of thinking"?
Margaret FalerSweany

Educators Evaluate 'Flipped Classrooms' | Andrew K. Miller - 74 views

  • replacing traditional classroom lectures with video tutorials
    • Bob Rowan
       
      This isn't a complete definition of flipped classrooms
  • there are a multitude of ways to “flip” a classroom
  • criticism from some who believe that flipping is simply a high-tech version of an antiquated instructional method: the lecture
  • ...9 more annotations...
  • a better version of a bad thing
  • Tips for Flipping
  • Don’t get hung up on creating your own videos
  • be intentional about when to flip
    • Bob Rowan
       
      Don't flip just for the sake of flipping, but this sort of reminder should not be required any longer with any new teaching technique
  • find a partner
  • find alternatives for students who lack Internet access
    • Bob Rowan
       
      this isn't any issue for many schools, but it important to note when presenting flipped classrooms to a wider variety of educators
  • engage students in the videos
    • Margaret FalerSweany
       
      One approach is to assign watching the video and then a low-stakes assignment--such as a quiz over key points, or having them write a short response to a key question that will be discussed the next class, or to write about what was unclear, new, or useful from the material.
  • given an outline for each unit that includes all the resources they might need for each objective
  • sets deadlines to keep everyone on track
  •  
    Shared by ISTE on 9/6/2012
  •  
    Shared by ISTE on 9/6/2012
Amy Gearhart

8 things every teacher can do to create an innovative classroom | eSchool News | eSchool News | 2 - 79 views

  • Give students the basics, but keep it short.
  • In his TED talk, Daniel Pink talks about the connection between creativity and what is know as Functional Fixedness—or people’s tendency to see only a single use for an object.
  • Whatever you do, don’t try to grade creativity and innovation.
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    Innovation and creativity can't be tested or graded, but they can be built up. Here's how.
Maughn Gregory

Helping Children Become More Mindful | Tufts Now - 77 views

  • kids are distracted and a little on edge these days, says the Tufts psychologist Christopher Willard
  • Child’s Mind: Mindfulness Practices to Help Our Children Be More Focused, Calm and Relaxed (Parallax Press)
  • The central idea of mindfulness, he says, is to bring a very focused awareness of the present moment into our everyday lives through things such as breathing exercises and actively listening to and observing the world around us.
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • Studies have shown that children can learn to regulate their emotions and concentrate better with the aid of mindfulness practices. Even children with attention deficit disorders have learned to concentrate better using these kinds of exercises.
  • Children as young as four, he says, can be taught to breathe in and out in a conscious way, with a little visual help. To do this, he suggests having the child lie on her back with a stuffed animal or pillow on her belly, which helps her become aware of her breathing as she watches the object go up and down.
  • Another mindfulness exercise is to ask a child to listen carefully for about a minute and then name five sounds he heard while being quiet.
Gerald Carey

Yale Makes 260,000 Images Available Online - With No Limitations On Their Usage | Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day... - 199 views

  • Yale University has one of the larger collections of art, objects and documents of any organization in the U.S. Now, digital images and audio files of the collection are free to access by anyone in the world online, according to an announcement by the university’s communications office. Yale Digital Commons has debuted with just under 260,000 images. The idea is to encompass the whole of the university’s collections in time.
Gareth Jones

Looking in the Wrong Places | Edge.org - 5 views

  • We should be very careful in thinking about whether we’re working on the right problems. If we don’t, that ties into the problem that we don’t have experimental evidence that could move us forward. We're trying to develop theories that we use to find out which are good experiments to make, and these are the experiments that we build.   We build particle detectors and try to find dark matter; we build larger colliders in the hope of producing new particles; we shoot satellites into orbit and try to look back into the early universe, and we do that because we hope there’s something new to find there. We think there is because we have some idea from the theories that we’ve been working on that this would be something good to probe. If we are working with the wrong theories, we are making the wrong extrapolations, we have the wrong expectations, we make the wrong experiments, and then we don’t get any new data. We have no guidance to develop these theories. So, it’s a chicken and egg problem. We have to break the cycle. I don’t have a miracle cure to these problems. These are hard problems. It’s not clear what a good theory is to develop. I’m not any wiser than all the other 20,000 people in the field.
  • I’m still asking myself the same question that I asked myself ten years ago: "What is going on in my community?" I work in the foundations of physics, and I see a lot of strange things happening there. When I look at the papers that are being published, many of them seem to be produced simply because papers have to be produced. They don’t move us forward in any significant way. I get the impression that people are working on them not so much because it’s what they’re interested in but because they have to produce outcomes in a short amount of time. They sit on short-term positions and have short-term contracts, and papers must be produced.
  • The field that I mostly work in is the foundations of physics, which is, roughly speaking, composed of cosmology, the foundations of quantum mechanics, high-energy particle physics, and quantum gravity. It’s a peculiar field because there hasn’t been new data for almost four decades, since we established the Standard Model of particle physics. There has been, of course, the Higgs particle that was discovered at the LHC in 2012, and there have been some additions to the Standard Model, but there has not been a great new paradigm change, as Kuhn would have put it. We’re still using the same techniques, and we’re still working with the same theories as we did in the 1970s.
  • ...10 more annotations...
  • That makes this field of science rather peculiar and probably explains why there hasn’t been much progress. But it’s not like we don’t have any questions that need to be answered. There are a lot of questions that have been around for decades. For example, what is dark energy? What is dark matter? What are the masses of the Standard Model particles? And what’s up with the foundation of quantum mechanics? Is a theory that's fundamentally not deterministic, where we cannot predict outcomes, the last word that we have, or is there something more to it? Is there maybe another underlying structure to reality?
  • but we haven't reached the fundamental level. Maybe we will never reach it. Certainly, the theories that we have right now are not all there is. The question is, of course, if we don’t have any guidance by experiment, how do we make progress? And are we doing the right thing?
  • We’ve reached this point where we have to carefully rethink if the criteria that we’re using to select our theories are promising at all. If one looks at the history of this field in the foundations of physics, progress has usually been made by looking at questions that, at least in hindsight, were well posed, where there was an actual mathematical contradiction. For example, special relativity is incompatible with Newtonian gravity. If you try to resolve this incompatibility, you get general relativity.
  • There are various similar examples where such breakthroughs have happened because there was a real problem. There was an inconsistency and people had to resolve it. It had nothing to do with beauty. Maybe beauty was, in some cases, the personal motivation of the people to work on it. There’s certainly some truth to this, but I don’t think it’s good to turn this story around and say that if we only pay attention to this motivation that comes from ideals of beauty it will lead to progress.
  • If we are working with the wrong theories, we are making the wrong extrapolations, we have the wrong expectations, we make the wrong experiments, and then we don’t get any new data. We have no guidance to develop these theories. So, it’s a chicken and egg problem. We have to break the cycle. I don’t have a miracle cure to these problems. These are hard problems. It’s not clear what a good theory is to develop. I’m not any wiser than all the other 20,000 people in the field.
  • The way that research is funded in foundations of physics and in many other fields just puts a lot of things at a disadvantage that are not pursued anymore. Typically, everything that takes longer than three years to complete, no one will start it because they can’t afford it. They can literally not afford it.
  • Who makes the decisions about the funding? Superficially, people say that it's a funding agency, so it’s the university who get to hire people. But that puts the blame on the wrong party. In the end it’s the community itself who makes the decisions. What do the funding agencies do if they get a proposal? They send it to reviewers. And who are the reviewers? They're people from the same community. If you look at how hiring decisions are being made, there’s some committee and they are people from the same community. They have some advisory boards or something, which contains people from the same community.
  • Even if that wasn’t so, what the people in these committees would be doing is looking at easy measures for scientific success. Presently, the most popular of these measures are the number of publications and the number of citations. And maybe also whether the person has published in high-impact journals. So, these are the typical measures that are presently being used. But what do they measure? They primarily measure popularity. They indicate whether somebody’s research is well received by a lot of people in the same community. And that’s why once a research area grows beyond a certain critical mass, you have sufficiently many people who tell each other that what they’re doing is the good thing to do. They review each other’s papers and say that that’s great and it's what we should continue to do. It’s a problem in all communities that grow beyond a certain size.
  • I later came to the United States and then Canada, and that gave me the opportunity to learn a lot about quantum gravity. I also figured out that much of what goes on in quantum gravity is very detached from reality. It’s pretty much only mathematics. Yes, the mathematics is there, but I still don’t know if it’s the mathematics that describes reality.
  • That’s the very reason why we don’t normally think of gravity as a weak force. It’s the only force that is left over on long distances, and the reason for this is that it adds up. It gets stronger the more mass you pile up. More precisely, we should say that the reason we find it so hard to measure quantum gravitational effects is that we either have a particle that has very pronounced quantum properties, like, say, a single electron or something like that, but then it’s so light that we cannot measure the gravitational field. Or we have some object that is so heavy that we can measure the gravitational field, but then it doesn’t have quantum properties. Okay, so that’s the actual problem.
clbrink

7 Key Considerations for Online and Blended Learning Programs -- THE Journal - 19 views

  • Online courses provide students with a level of flexibility and choice
    • clbrink
       
      This is true....choice and voice are important 
  • Infuse digital literacy and citizenship into your online strategy. "
  • Find a good partner to work with
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • Reach out when students appear to be struggling.
  • Use online learning to reach a more diverse group of learners.
  • Put a spotlight on interpersonal communications.
  • strong collaboration between students, teachers and parents.
  • . The discussions are asynchronous, so students can share their input when it best suits them.
  • Outline the virtual school's objectives and goals early in the game.
  • discipline, commitment, and organization are key traits for any successful student,
  • four- to five-day orientation course
    • clbrink
       
      Should we be doing this in CAA?
Matt Renwick

Education Week Teacher: How to Make the Most of Your Professional Learning Community - 33 views

  • During our first meeting of the school year, we jotted down on sticky notes what each of us wanted to accomplish in our weekly meetings. Three main ideas rose to the top and have driven our work together ever since: support for each other, help with pacing an overwhelming curriculum, and detailed plans to implement with our students. Everything we do as a group addresses one or more of these three objectives.
  • Talking about the issues and pressures of teaching—always in a solutions-focused way, of course—is cathartic itself.
  • PLCs must find ways to share the workload, not increase it.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • Effective PLCs must focus on student learning. It's no use becoming bogged down in issues or procedures that are out of our control as classroom teachers.
  • To keep ourselves on track, we examine our students' strengths and weaknesses, creating plans that maximize student success.
Ryan Evans

10 Best Practices for Implementing Gamification - 15 views

  • make sure you know what constitutes success.
  • Only use gamification as a learning solution when it makes sense and resonates with learners. 
  • Explain why the learners are earning points, who they are trying to save, why they are searching for a treasure. Remember, gamification works well when it is within a context—create a reason why learners should interact with the content you have created.
  • ...7 more annotations...
  • Retrieval practice requires learners to recall information rather than simply re-read or re-listen to it.
  • The learners should be able to directly link their actions and activities to a score so they know what they need to do to be successful.
  • Keep leaderboards small
  • Use levels and badges appropriately
  • Let the learner know how many levels they are going to need to complete before the learning is over.
  • Badges, on the other hand, are good for showing non-linear progress. Badges can be tied to either terminal or enabling objectives. Also, if possible provide a place where learners can “show off” badges to leverage the social effectiveness of gamification. 
  • Bonus: monitor learner progress
acarraro

Intrinsic Locks and Synchronization (The Java™ Tutorials > Essential Classes > Concurrency) - 3 views

  • When a thread releases an intrinsic lock, a happens-before relationship is established between that action and any subsequent acquisition of the same lock.
    • acarraro
       
      Come un commit di una transazione
  • When a thread invokes a synchronized method, it automatically acquires the intrinsic lock for that method's object and releases it when the method returns. The lock release occurs even if the return was caused by an uncaught exception.
  • what happens when a static synchronized method is invoked
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • public void addName(String name) { synchronized(this) { lastName = name; nameCount++; } nameList.add(name); }
  • Allowing a thread to acquire the same lock more than once enables reentrant synchronization.
A Strang

adaptations_and_modifications_guide.pdf (application/pdf Object) - 26 views

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    The BC Ministry of Education has included UDL as a strategy for designing learning materials that meet the needs of diverse learners.
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