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D Murray

Ralph Tyler's Little Book - 43 views

  • The belief at the time was that schools should require strong discipline and that "children should not talk to one another; all communication should be between the teacher and the class (Tyler, 1975)."
  • War I, as it soon would be called, would have a dramatic effect on education
  • Following the introduction of the Army's intelligence test, a "Testing Movement" in education, became established and spread throughout the United States
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  • He saw testing and "the holes in testing for memorization"
  • as a problem to study for life
  • The most important and comprehensive curriculum experiment ever carried on in the United States..."
  • This methodology engages the student in a number of projects. The projects he defined as "a purposeful activity carried to completion in a natural setting
  • most famous work was his "little" book Basic Principles of Curriculum and Instruction
  • What educational purposes should the school seek to attain? How can learning experiences be selected which are likely to be useful in attaining these objectives? How can learning experiences be organized for effective instruction? How can the effectiveness of learning experiences be evaluated?
  • The fifth and final section describes "How a school or College staff may work on curriculum building."
  • do not have clearly defined purposes
  • 1. Establish broad goals or objectives.2. Classify the goals or objectives.3. Define objectives in behavioral terms.4. Find situations in which achievement if objectives can be shown.5. Develop or select measurement techniques.6. Collect performance data.7. Compare performance data with behaviorally stated objectives.
  • education as "an active process
  • It involves the active efforts of the learner himself."
  • The first of these was through direct instruction
  • Tyler's greatest gift to the field of education was the development of an objectives-based evaluation model.
  • "the father of behavioral objectives.
Erin DeBell

Indirect Object Pronouns - 1 views

    • Erin DeBell
       
      Important!  The Direct Object might be understood but not stated.   Example: "I tell him" would be "Yo le digo" since what I tell him (the direct object) is WORDS or a SECRET or SOMETHING that it is implied but not stated in the sentence.  FYI.
  • the book
  • the book
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  • Where is the book going?
  • Where is the book going?
  • The indirect object answers the question "To whom?" or "For whom?" the action of the verb is performed
  • María
  • To identify the indirect object use our two guidelines: The IO tells us where the DO is going. The IO answers the question "to whom?" or "for whom" the action of the verb is performed.
    • Erin DeBell
       
      Important!  You need to understand Direct Objects before Indirect Objects.
    • Erin DeBell
       
      PLACEMENT.  This section tells you WHERE TO PUT THE Indirect Object.
  • me (me) te (you-familiar) le (him, her, you-formal) nos (us) os (you-all-familiar) les (them, you-all-formal)
    • Erin DeBell
       
      WHAT ARE THE PRONOUNS?  Some students get confused because the I.O. pronouns look VERY SIMILIAR to the D.O. pronouns.  Notice the I.O. pronouns use LE/LES instead of LO/LA/LOS/LAS.
    • Erin DeBell
       
      Very helpful!  Does this section make sense?
  • You must learn to think in phrases, not words.
  • me compra he buys me me compran they buy me me compras you buy me
  • The IO pronouns le and les present a special problem because they are ambiguous. That is, they can stand for different things. leto (for) him to (for) herto (for) you-formal lesto (for) them to (for) you-all-formal
  • Since le and les can mean more than one thing, a prepositional phrase is often added to remove the ambiguity
Suzanne Nelson

How to Turn Pen Notations into Objects in ActivStudio « classroom2point0 - 0 views

  • How to Turn Pen Notations into Objects in ActivStudio In a previous post, I mentioned that ActivStudio (Promethean Software) does not allow pen and highlighter notations to be treated as objects. If you ever find it absolutely necessary to turn a pen notation into an object, you can do it using the following steps.
Erin DeBell

Direct and Indirect Object Pronouns Used Together - 0 views

    • Erin DeBell
       
      How to remember this???  Use the acronym RID, which stands for REFLEXIVE, INDIRECT, DIRECT.  No matter what combination of pronouns you have, this will tell you what order to put them in. When might you have a reflexive verb with a direct or indiret object? Example: I wash my hands. Me lavo las manos. I wash them. Me las lavo. Reflexive first (me) then Direct Object (las [for las manos]). There is no indirect object in this example.  How do you know you are dealing with a reflexive verb and a direct object combo??? Well, ME LAVO is a reflexive verb (from the infinitive LAVARSE). The D.O. is LAS MANOS becuase they are WHAT IS GETTING WASHED (washed being the main action of the sentence).
  • Whenever both pronouns begin with the letter "l" change the first pronoun to "se."
    • Erin DeBell
       
      In Spanish, we don't like the double L sound created by LE LO, LE LA, etc.   Remember, "there is no LA-LA land in Spanish."   Always change the first pronoun to SE.
    • Erin DeBell
       
      The best way to remember this is to learn this rhyme: In Spanish, you can SAY LOW but you can't LAY LOW." AKA: You can "se lo" but you can't "le lo"... By extention, you can "se la," "se los," and "se las" :-) But you cannot "le la," "le los" or "le las" NO LA-LA Land (double L sound) in Spanish!!!
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  • Because the pronoun se can have so many meanings, it is often helpful to clarify it by using a prepositional phrase.
    • Erin DeBell
       
      Remember we use SE with reflexive verbs... Don't let that confuse you!  Se is not an acceptable choice for an indirect object pronoun.  It is merely USED in place of the correct pronoun (le or les).
  • a Juan.
  • a María.
  • a ella.
  • In sentences with two verbs, there are two options regarding the placement of the pronouns. Place them immediately before the conjugated verb or attach them directly to the infinitive.
    • Erin DeBell
       
      Do you get Direct and Indirect objects?  Can you use them both together?  Prove it!!! http://www.studyspanish.com/practice/iodopro.htm
Erin DeBell

Direct Object Pronouns - 0 views

    • Erin DeBell
       
      I identify the Direct Object by finding the "main" verb of the sentence, the action verb.  In the highlighted sentence to the right, what is the main (or only) verb? HIT. To identify the D.O., ask yourself WHO or WHAT is being hit in this sentence? The ball.  Your Direct Object is THE BALL. What is the action verb in the next sentence? READS.  Ask yourself the question... Who or what is getting read? The BOOK.  So the book is your D.O.   It's as easy as that.  If you can identify the main/action verb, you can identify the D.O.
  • Example 1
  • bought
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    • Erin DeBell
       
      What is the action verb in the first sentence? BOUGHT. What got bought in the sentence? FLOWERS. FLOWERS is your D.O.
  • When the pronoun replaces the name of the direct object, use the following pronouns:
  • me (me) te (you-familiar) lo, la (him, her, it, you-formal) nos (us) os (you-all-familiar) los, las (them, you-all-formal)
    • Erin DeBell
       
      PLACEMENT.  Important.  Where do you put the pronoun once you figure out what it is?
  • Look at how Spanish and English are different. "Lo tengo" and "La tengo" BOTH mean "I have it."
  • direct translation doesn't work so well:
  • La como.
  • This is completely incorrect!
  • Learn to translate groups of words, rather than individual words. The first step is to learn to view two Spanish words as a single phrase.
  • Just as no one has ever learned to ride a bicycle by reading about it, neither will you learn to use direct object pronouns simply by reading this lesson. The key to success, as always, is to practice, practice, practice.
    • Erin DeBell
       
      Do you feel like you understand Direct Objects?  Are you frustrated?  If so, how much have you practiced?  How many sample exercises have you done? If you read and take notes on a good explanation and then do some exercises, you will feel much more confident with the topic. 
    • Erin DeBell
       
      Try this simple, extremely helpful exercise: http://www.studyspanish.com/practice/dopro1.htm
Randolph Hollingsworth

ASU - Service Learning USL210 - 5 views

  •  
    COURSE OBJECTIVES: This is a graded internship that allows you to integrate your own coursework with a hands-on service learning experience. The central objective of this course is to provide students with community experiences and reflection opportunities that examine community needs, the importance of civic engagement, and social justice issues affecting ethnic minorities and marginalized populations in contemporary American society. Students dedicate 70 hours at a pre-approved site (including Title I K-12 schools, youth programs, health services, social services, environmental programs, government agencies, etc.) directly serving a population in need or supporting activities that contribute to the greater good of our community. A weekly seminar, course readings, discussions, and reflection assignments facilitate critical thinking and a deeper understanding of cultural diversity, citizenship, and how to contribute to positive social change in our community. The course is also designed to provide "real-world" experiences that exercise academic skills and knowledge applicable to each student‟s program of study and career exploration. STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Student will be introduced to essential skills associated with their baccalaureate studies to actively serve the local community. While completing this in-depth study of cultural diversity, citizenship and social justice issues facing our community, students will gain an understanding of the value of Social Embeddedness and the importance of incorporating civic engagement into their collegiate careers, as they strive to become civically engaged students. Students will be introduced to inequalities, discrimination, and other community issues facing ethnic minorities and marginalized populations, as well as the correlation with greater societal issues. INTERNSHIP RESPONSIBILITIES:  Service hours - 70 hours of community outreach (spread throughout the semester in which you are enrolled in the course)
Randolph Hollingsworth

Ariz State Univ - Service Learning syllabus (USL410 Indep Placement) - 7 views

  •  
    COURSE OBJECTIVES: This is a graded internship that allows you to integrate your own coursework with a hands-on service learning experience. The central objective of this course is to provide students with community experiences and reflection opportunities that examine community needs, the importance of civic engagement, and social justice issues affecting ethnic minorities and marginalized populations in contemporary American society. Students dedicate 70 hours at a pre-approved site (including Title I K-12 schools, youth programs, health services, social services, environmental programs, government agencies, etc.) directly serving a population in need or supporting activities that contribute to the greater good of our community. A weekly seminar, course readings, discussions, and reflection assignments facilitate critical thinking and a deeper understanding of cultural diversity, citizenship, and how to contribute to positive social change in our community. The course is also designed to provide "real-world" experiences that exercise academic skills and knowledge applicable to each student‟s program of study and career exploration. STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES: Student will be introduced to essential skills associated with their baccalaureate studies to actively serve the local community. While completing this in-depth study of cultural diversity, citizenship and social justice issues facing our community, students will gain an understanding of the value of Social Embeddedness and the importance of incorporating civic engagement into their collegiate careers, as they strive to become civically engaged students. Students will be introduced to inequalities, discrimination, and other community issues facing ethnic minorities and marginalized populations, as well as the correlation with greater societal issues. INTERNSHIP RESPONSIBILITIES:  Service hours - 70 hours of community outreach (spread throughout the semester in which you are enrolled in the course)
Don Doehla

Education Update:How We Got Grading Wrong, and What to Do About It:How We Got Grading Wrong, and What to Do About It - 72 views

  •  
    "Rubrics hold a mirror up to your objectives for an assessment task. Matt Townsley remembers well the day he looked into this mirror and didn't like what he saw. "I realized my criteria were mostly about how neat the project looked. It hit me that students could do well without knowing a whole lot about the learning objective."
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  •  
    "Rubrics hold a mirror up to your objectives for an assessment task. Matt Townsley remembers well the day he looked into this mirror and didn't like what he saw. "I realized my criteria were mostly about how neat the project looked. It hit me that students could do well without knowing a whole lot about the learning objective."
  •  
    This sounds like an interesting article that someone took the time out to put up here on Diigo. There's only one problem, this seems to be some sort of "pay to view" site. Visitors actually cannot see the article in question (well, they get a 2-paragraph preview). Diigo friends, please don't point to sites that don't give the full information.
  •  
    Actually, one need not pay, but to read the whole article, one does have to sign in - the account is free, and I understand some don't want to sign in. Still, the article raises some good points.
Beth Panitz

Curriculum Objectives - 140 views

  •  
    Goals and Objectives for every subject area and every grade level. Can be printed as a list of Objectives or as a quarterly progress summary.
Suzanne Nelson

classroom2point0 - 60 views

  • The biggest advantage bubbl.us has over other mind-mapping software is that you do not have to have an account to create and print a mind-map (also known as a concept map).  This means students can get online, map the concept they have been assigned, and print it out for you to grade. 
  • TIPS FOR YOU As you have your students work with bubbl, here are some tips to keep in mind. “FIT” centers the mind-map in the middle of the screen (useful for panicked students who think their whole project has been deleted) if students move a “parent” bubble, all the “child” bubbles will follow along
  • But I knew that bubbl was truly useful when one of my students reported she had used it to help her decide which college to attend.
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  • How to Turn Pen Notations into Objects in ActivStudio In a previous post, I mentioned that ActivStudio (Promethean Software) does not allow pen and highlighter notations to be treated as objects. If you ever find it absolutely necessary to turn a pen notation into an object, you can do it using the following steps.
  •  
    Why bubbl.us Works & Tips for Use
Suzanne Nelson

How to Adjust to Your Interactive Whiteboard: Animate Objects and Add Sound « classroom2point0 - 3 views

  • How to Adjust to Your Interactive Whiteboard: Animate Objects and Add Sound There is nothing quite as fascinating to students as words and objects that appear and disappear on command. And if you’re looking for a giggle or a laugh, nothing does the trick like an unexpected sound effect when a student is at your board. Embedding sounds and setting up Object Animation is pretty straight-forward. Once you get the hang of it, you’ll be able to add surprise elements quickly and create elaborate, interactive pages sure to capture your students’ attention.
Erin DeBell

Indirect Object Pronouns: Part Three - 0 views

    • Erin DeBell
       
      SCROLL DOWN FOR AN IMPORTANT RULE FOR SENTENCES WITH MULTIPLE VERBS (BACK TO BACK VERBS)
  • When a sentence has two verbs, the first verb is conjugated and the second verb remains in the infinitive form.
  • Puedo pagar
  • ...10 more annotations...
  • prefiere hablar
  • In sentences with two verbs, there are two options regarding the placement of the indirect object pronoun.
  • Here are examples of the indirect object pronoun placed before the conjugated verb:
  • Here are examples of the indirect object pronoun attached directly to the infinitive:
  • Here are the two methods side by side. Neither method is "better" than the other.
  • you must learn to recognize whole groups of words, rather than inspecting each word independently.
  • Your success in being able to recognize these groups is largely dependent upon having learned previous material -- namely verb conjugation.
  • You need to be able to quickly recognize a conjugated verb and an infinitive. You need to automatically recognize "necesito comprar" as "I need to buy."
  • If you can do that, it is just one small step to recognize "te necesito comprar" as "I need to buy for you." From there, the final step is easy: "Te necesito comprar un regalo."
    • Erin DeBell
       
      How quickly are you able to recognize and produce conjugations of key verbs?  Most students are not as confident with conjugation as they should be when they start studying object pronouns.  No wonder it does not come easy!  Want to fix this?   Visit this link to practice conjugating common irregular verbs in the present tense.  If you like it, keep practicing all the other tenses you need to know!
    • Erin DeBell
       
      http://conjuguemos.com/home/docs/nologin/spanish_verbs_verbs_6.html This link also includes regular verbs, FYI.  Follow the link and click START to begin!
Melissa Julian

Bloom's Taxonomy Blooms Digitally - 158 views

  •  
    The elements cover many of the activities and objectives but they do not address the new objectives presented by the emergence and integration of Information and Communication Technologies into the classroom and the lives of our students.
Brad Belbas

update on Warner Music (UPDATED) (AGAIN) (Lessig Blog) - 0 views

  •  
    This is a video of a talk that Lawrence Lessig (Professor, Stanford Law School) gave for an organization. In his talk, Lessig provides a powerful and piercing analysis and critique on the impact that legal restrictions on the re/use of media resources has on creativity and cultural production. During his talk, Lessig shows some remarkably creative mash-ups videos on YouTube to exemplify the kind of creativity/cultural production that is possible through ubiquitous digital media. Ironically, the organization that hosted the talk received a notice from Warner Bros Music after posting a video of the Lessig's talk on YouTube, which, according to Lessig's blog, "objected to its being posted on copyright grounds." Warner Brother Music Group has implemented content-id algorithms (i.e., technology that detects the digital "fingerprint" of corporate-"owned" copyrighted works) through media hosting services, including YouTube, FaceBook, and others. When the video of Lessig's talk was posted, it was 'dusted' for fingerprints of WBMG copyrighted works. The detection system identified the soundtracks in the YouTube videos Lessig showed, as materials to which they held copyright. Both the video of Lessig's talk and the blog conversation regarding WBMG's objection are must-see resources.
BTerres

How much carbon… - 64 views

  •  
    How much CO2 is created by a banana? A wedding? A flight to New York? We teamed up with GE to turn 'tons of carbon' into an interactive visual landscape. Enter a CO2 value. Hit the 'random' button for serendipity. Or just click through objects like stepping stones. (There are nearly 200 objects so it may take a second to load) Designed by David McCandless
Jim Julius

Instructional Objectives Builder - 84 views

  •  
    The old Radio James objective builder has been revived by ASU Online.
Ian Woods

AJET 26(3) Drexler (2010) - The networked student model for construction of personal learning environments: Balancing teacher control and student autonomy - 77 views

  • Web application(networked studentcomponent) Tool usedin test case Student activitylevel of structure Social bookmarking (RSS) Delicioushttp://delicious.com/ Set up the account Subscribe to each others accounts Bookmark and read 10 reliable websites that reflect the content of chosen topic Add and read at least 3 additional sites each week. News and blog alert (RSS) Google Alerthttp://www.google.com/alerts Create a Google Alert of keywords associated with selected topic Read news and blogs on that topic that are delivered via email daily Subscribe to appropriate blogs in reader News and blog reader (RSS) Google Readerhttp://reader.google.com Search for blogs devoted to chosen topic Subscribe to blogs to keep track of updates Personal blog (RSS) Bloggerhttp://www.blogger.com Create a personal blog Post a personal reflection each day of the content found and experiences related to the use of personal learning environment Students subscribe to each others blogs in reader Internet search (information management, contacts, and synchronous communication) Google Scholarhttp://scholar.google.com/ Conduct searches in Google Scholar and library databases for scholarly works. Bookmark appropriate sites Consider making contact with expert for video conference Podcasts (RSS) iTunesUhttp://www.apple.com/itunes/whatson/itunesu.html Search iTunesU for podcasts related to topic Subscribe to at least 2 podcasts if possible Video conferencing (contacts and synchronous communication) Skypehttp://www.skype.com Identify at least one subject matter expert to invite to Skype with the class. Content gathering/ digital notebook Evernotehttp://evernote.com/ Set up account Use Evernote to take notes on all content collected via other tools Content synthesis Wikispaceshttp://www.wikispaces.com Post final project on personal page of class wiki The process and tools are overwhelming to students if presented all at once. As with any instructional design, the teacher determines the pace at which the students best assimilate each new learning tool. For this particular project, a new tool was introduced each day over two weeks. Once the construction process was complete, there were a number of personal web page aggregators that could have been selected to bring everything together in one place. Options at the time included iGoogle, PageFlakes, NetVibes, and Symbaloo. These sites offer a means to compile or pull together content from a variety of web applications. A web widget or gadget is a bit of code that is executed within the personal web page to pull up external content from other sites. The students in this case designed the personal web page using the gadgets needed in the format that best met their learning goals. Figure 3 is an instructor example of a personal webpage that includes the reader, email, personal blog, note taking program, and social bookmarks on one page. The personal learning environment can take the place of a traditional textbook, though does not preclude the student from using a textbook or accessing one or more numerous open source texts that may be available for the research topic. The goal is to access content from many sources to effectively meet the learning objectives. The next challenge is to determine whether those objectives have been met. Figure 3: Personal web page compiles learning tools
  • Table 2: Personal learning environment toolset Web application (networked student component) Tool used in test case Student activity level of structure Social bookmarking (RSS) Delicious http://delicious.com/ Set up the account Subscribe to each others accounts Bookmark and read 10 reliable websites that reflect the content of chosen topic Add and read at least 3 additional sites each week. News and blog alert (RSS) Google Alert http://www.google.com/alerts Create a Google Alert of keywords associated with selected topic Read news and blogs on that topic that are delivered via email daily Subscribe to appropriate blogs in reader News and blog reader (RSS) Google Reader http://reader.google.com Search for blogs devoted to chosen topic Subscribe to blogs to keep track of updates Personal blog (RSS) Blogger http://www.blogger.com Create a personal blog Post a personal reflection each day of the content found and experiences related to the use of personal learning environment Students subscribe to each others blogs in reader Internet search (information management, contacts, and synchronous communication) Google Scholar http://scholar.google.com/ Conduct searches in Google Scholar and library databases for scholarly works. Bookmark appropriate sites Consider making contact with expert for video conference Podcasts (RSS) iTunesU http://www.apple.com/itunes/ whatson/itunesu.html Search iTunesU for podcasts related to topic Subscribe to at least 2 podcasts if possible Video conferencing (contacts and synchronous communication) Skype http://www.skype.com Identify at least one subject matter expert to invite to Skype with the class. Content gathering/ digital notebook Evernote http://evernote.com/ Set up account Use Evernote to take notes on all content collected via other tools Content synthesis Wikispaces http://www.wikispaces.com Post final project on personal page of class wiki The process and tools are overwhelming to students if presented all at once. As with any instructional design, the teacher determines the pace at which the students best assimilate each new learning tool. For this particular project, a new tool was introduced each day over two weeks. Once the construction process was complete, there were a number of personal web page aggregators that could have been selected to bring everything together in one place. Options at the time included iGoogle, PageFlakes, NetVibes, and Symbaloo. These sites offer a means to compile or pull together content from a variety of web applications. A web widget or gadget is a bit of code that is executed within the personal web page to pull up external content from other sites. The students in this case designed the personal web page using the gadgets needed in the format that best met their learning goals. Figure 3 is an instructor example of a personal webpage that includes the reader, email, personal blog, note taking program, and social bookmarks on one page.
  • The personal learning environment can take the place of a traditional textbook, though does not preclude the student from using a textbook or accessing one or more numerous open source texts that may be available for the research topic. The goal is to access content from many sources to effectively meet the learning objectives. The next challenge is to determine whether those objectives have been met.
  • ...1 more annotation...
  • AssessmentThere were four components of the assessment process for this test case of the Networked Student Model: (1) Ongoing performance assessment in the form of weekly assignments to facilitate the construction and maintenance of the personal learning environment, (2) rubric-based assessment of the personal learning environment at the end of the project, (3) written essay, and (4) multimedia synthesis of topic content. Points were earned for meeting the following requirements: Identify ten reliable resources and post to social bookmarking account. At least three new resources should be added each week. Subscribe and respond to at least 3 new blogs each week. Follow these blogs and news alerts using the reader. Subscribe to and listen to at least two podcasts (if available). Respectfully contact and request a video conference from a subject matter expert recognised in the field. Maintain daily notes and highlight resources as needed in digital notebook. Post at least a one-paragraph reflection in personal blog each day. At the end of the project, the personal learning environment was assessed with a rubric that encompassed each of the items listed above. The student's ability to synthesise the research was further evaluated with a reflective essay. Writing shapes thinking (Langer & Applebee, 1987), and the essay requirement was one more avenue through which the students demonstrated higher order learning. The personal blog provided an opportunity for regular reflection during the course of the project. The essay was the culmination of the reflections along with a thoughtful synthesis of the learning experience. Students were instructed to articulate what was learned about the selected topic and why others should care or be concerned. The essay provided an overview of everything learned about the contemporary issue. It was well organised, detailed, and long enough to serve as a resource for others who wished to learn from the work. As part of a final exam, the students were required to access the final projects of their classmates and reflect on what they learned from this exposure. The purpose of this activity was to give the students an additional opportunity to share and learn from each other. Creativity is considered a key 21st century skill (Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2009). A number of emerging web applications support the academic creative process. Students in this project used web tools to combine text, video, audio, and photographs to teach the research topics to others. The final multimedia project was posted or embedded on the student's personal wiki page. Analysis and assessment of student work was facilitated by the very technologies in use by the students. In order to follow their progress, the teacher simply subscribed to student social bookmarking accounts, readers, and blogs. Clicking through daily contributions was relatively quick and efficient.
  •  
    Scholarly and important but also practical. Scroll down for an incredible chart of ideas that challenges older students to take charge of their own learning.
Jenny Gough

An Introduction to Inquiry-Based Learning - 122 views

  •  
    "What kinds of questions make for good inquiry-based projects? As we said, they must first be questions that the kids truly care about because they come up with them themselves. In addition, good questions share the following characteristics: The questions must be answerable. "What is the poem 'Dream Deferred' based on?" is answerable. "Why did Langston Hughes write it?" may be answerable if such information exists, or if the students have some relevant and defensible opinions. "Why did he choose this particular word in line six?" is not answerable because the only person likely to know such a specific answer is Hughes himself, now deceased. The answer cannot be a simple fact. "In what year was Lincoln killed?" doesn't make for a very compelling project because you can just look it up in any number of books or Web sites. "What factors caused the assassination attempt?" might be a good project because it will require research, interpretation, and analysis. The answer can't already be known. "What is hip-hop music?" is a bit too straightforward and the kids are not likely to learn much more than they know already. "What musical styles does hip-hop draw from and how?" offers more opportunity for exploration. The questions must have some objective basis for an answer. "Why is the sky blue?" can be answered through research. "Why did God make the sky blue?" cannot because it is a faith-based question. Both are meaningful, valid, real questions, but the latter isn't appropriate for an inquiry-based project. "What have people said about why God made the sky blue?" might be appropriate. Likewise, "Why did the dinosaurs become extinct?" is ultimately unanswerable in that form because no humans were around to know for sure, but "What do scientists believe was the reason for their extinction?" or "What does the evidence suggest about the cause?" will work. Questions based on value judgments don't work for similar reasons. You can't objectively answer "Is Hamle
Michele Brown

Pixton | World's Best Way to Make & Share Comics - 70 views

shared by Michele Brown on 21 Jul 10 - Cached
  • Unleash your creativity! Fun, quick and easy to use.
    Tell your story your way.

  • Unleash your creativity! Fun, quick and easy to use
  • Create real comic layouts. Edit the shape and position of each comic panel. Express yourself. Unlimited range of expression. Move your characters into any pose. Style your words. Give text and speech bubbles personality in any language. Add your own images. Upload photos and personalize with your own art. Make your own art. Group objects to create original characters, props and backgrounds. Show your personality. Design characters of any age — people and other animals. Fast and easy. Kickstart your creativity with presets, shortcuts and templates. Make 'em laugh! Share instantly with friends, family, classmates and colleagues.  
  •  
    Comic strip generator. Requires login
  •  
    Pixton is a widely used comic strip maker. The personal account is free. So many options and the click and drag editing is really easy to use. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ICT+&+Web+Tools
  •  
    Create comics
Martin Burrett

YAKiT Kids - 50 views

  •  
    Apple app for animating photos by adding talking mouths and eyes to inanimate objects. Record audio for the objects to say to make explanation videos and more.
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