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Marc Hamlin

NookColor Rooting - NookDevs - 70 views

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    This site will show you how to turn that Nook Color you got for Christmas into a full-fledged Android tablet.  Costs a fraction of what the iPad costs and is rock solid stable.  You can use the Android Marketplace to download apps like Edmodo.com for free.  Insanely easy to do.  This is NOT like jailbreaking your iPod/Pad.  The Android Marketplace is completely legitimate and growing by leaps and bounds.
Justin Medved

The Answer Factory: Demand Media and the Fast, Disposable, and Profitable as Hell Media Model | Magazine - 24 views

  • Pieces are not dreamed up by trained editors nor commissioned based on submitted questions. Instead they are assigned by an algorithm, which mines nearly a terabyte of search data, Internet traffic patterns, and keyword rates to determine what users want to know and how much advertisers will pay to appear next to the answers.
  • To appreciate the impact Demand is poised to have on the Web, imagine a classroom where one kid raises his hand after every question and screams out the answer. He may not be smart or even right, but he makes it difficult to hear anybody else.
  • But what Demand has realized is that the Internet gets only half of the simplest economic formula right: It has the supply part down but ignores demand. Give a million monkeys a million WordPress accounts and you still might never get a seven-point tutorial on how to keep wasps away from a swimming pool. Yet that’s what people want to know.
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  • That’s not to say there isn’t any room for humans in Demand’s process. They just aren’t worth very much. First, a crowdsourced team of freelance “title proofers” turn the algorithm’s often awkward or nonsensical phrases into something people will understand: “How to make a church-pew breakfast nook,” for example, becomes “How to make a breakfast nook out of a church pew.” Approved headlines get fed into a password-protected section of Demand’s Web site called Demand Studios, where any Demand freelancer can see what jobs are available. It’s the online equivalent of day laborers waiting in front of Home Depot. Writers can typically select 10 articles at a time; videographers can hoard 40. Nearly every freelancer scrambles to load their assignment queue with titles they can produce quickly and with the least amount of effort — because pay for individual stories is so lousy, only a high-speed, high-volume approach will work. The average writer earns $15 per article for pieces that top out at a few hundred words, and the average filmmaker about $20 per clip, paid weekly via PayPal. Demand also offers revenue sharing on some articles, though it can take months to reach even $15 in such payments. Other freelancers sign up for the chance to copyedit ($2.50 an article), fact-check ($1 an article), approve the quality of a film (25 to 50 cents a video), transcribe ($1 to $2 per video), or offer up their expertise to be quoted or filmed (free). Title proofers get 8 cents a headline. Coming soon: photographers and photo editors. So far, the company has paid out more than $17 million to Demand Studios workers; if the enterprise reaches Rosenblatt’s goal of producing 1 million pieces of content a month, the payouts could easily hit $200 million a year, less than a third of what The New York Times shells out in wages and benefits to produce its roughly 5,000 articles a month.
  • But once it was automated, every algorithm-generated piece of content produced 4.9 times the revenue of the human-created ideas. So Rosenblatt got rid of the editors. Suddenly, profit on each piece was 20 to 25 times what it had been. It turned out that gut instinct and experience were less effective at predicting what readers and viewers wanted — and worse for the company — than a formula.
  • Here is the thing that Rosenblatt has since discovered: Online content is not worth very much. This may be a truism, but Rosenblatt has the hard, mathematical proof. It’s right there in black and white, in the Demand Media database — the lifetime value of every story, algorithmically derived, and very, very small. Most media companies are trying hard to increase those numbers, to boost the value of their online content until it matches the amount of money it costs to produce. But Rosenblatt thinks they have it exactly backward. Instead of trying to raise the market value of online content to match the cost of producing it — perhaps an impossible proposition — the secret is to cut costs until they match the market value.
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    This is facinating!!!
Kathy Fiedler

BookBub: Free and Bargain eBooks for Kindle, Nook, and more - 5 views

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    Join our 300,000+ happy subscribers. It's free!  Most major eReader formats supported.
Roland Gesthuizen

E-Book Sales Rise in Children's and Young Adult Categories - NYTimes.com - 28 views

  • now that e-readers are cheaper and more plentiful, they have gone mass market, reaching consumers across age and demographic groups, and enticing some members of the younger generation to pick them up for the first time.
  • Kids are drawn to the devices, and there’s a definite desire by parents to move books into this format,” Ms. Vila said. “Now you’re finding people who are saying: ‘Let’s use the platform. Let’s use it as a way for kids to learn.’ 
  • I didn’t buy it until I knew that the teachers in middle school were allowing kids to read their books on their e-readers
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  • the family used the local library — already stocked with more than 3,000 e-books — to download titles free, sparing her the usual chore of “lugging around 40 pounds of books
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    "Ever since the holidays, publishers have noticed that some unusual titles have spiked in e-book sales. The "Chronicles of Narnia" series. "Hush, Hush." The "Dork Diaries" series. At HarperCollins, for example, e-books made up 25 percent of all young-adult sales in January, up from about 6 percent a year before - a boom in sales that quickly got the attention of publishers there. "
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    Interesting to read how children are now increasingly choosing to buy eBooks and a role for schools.
David Hochheiser

375 Free eBooks: Download to Kindle, iPad/iPhone & Nook | Open Culture - 9 views

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    Bottomless free literature, courses, etc.
mrshedrick678

Lori's Latest Links - 153 views

    • mrshedrick678
       
      I met Lori at a conference in Columbus. She was doing a workshop that was part of a conference I attended. She gave so many awesome tips and tricks. I try to check back at her site at least once a month because she always has new stuff.
  • Featured Freebies
  • Faves
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    • mrshedrick678
       
      I can always find good things here
    • mrshedrick678
       
      This is great section to find good stuff!
  • I like carrying them around, folding down the corner of the pages to mark my spot, and the way they look stacked on my nightstand. Sorry Kindle, Nook, and iPad... I'm just not that into you
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    Thank you for sharing her site! She mentioned something called Chatzy and it might be the perfect solution for a communication challenge I have at work each day. I hope it can be past the school's security.
Chris Carter

Readlists - 149 views

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    Create an ebook from a group of webpages. Send to Kindle, iPad/iPod, or download as an epub (for Nooks and other readers).
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    This site lets you bundle web pages for mobile devices
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    Take any bunch of web pages and turn them into an e-book. gone are the days when you photocopy readers. Now, e-publish! Weightless, instant, and free!
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