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Enid Baines

Gatsby in Real Life: Nonfiction on the Themes of Gatsby | BOOK RIOT - 33 views

  • I started this two-parter with a list of nonfiction books about the life and times of The Great Gatsby’s author, F. Scott Fitzgerald. In this post, I’m going to stretch the time period a little bit and offer some nonfiction about some of the themes that resonated most with me from the book.
  • a list of nonfiction books about the life and times of The Great Gatsby’s author, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • a list of nonfiction books about the life and times of The Great Gatsby’s author, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • ...8 more annotations...
  • a list of nonfiction books about the life and times of The Great Gatsby’s author, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • a list of nonfiction books about the life and times of The Great Gatsby’s author, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • a list of nonfiction books about the life and times of The Great Gatsby’s author, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • a list of nonfiction books about the life and times of The Great Gatsby’s author, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • a list of nonfiction books about the life and times of The Great Gatsby’s author, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • a list of nonfiction books about the life and times of The Great Gatsby’s author, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • a list of nonfiction books about the life and times of The Great Gatsby’s author, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
  • a list of nonfiction books about the life and times of The Great Gatsby’s author, F. Scott Fitzgerald.
Martha Hickson

101 Spectacular Nonfiction Stories | Byliner Spotlights - 39 views

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    Conor Friedersdorf's annual collection of the very best that journalism has to offer.
Susan Harari

What should children read? - 5 views

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    NYT op-ed on using narrative nonfiction in the classroom.
Brianna Crowley

Education Week: Interpretations Differ on Common Core's Nonfiction Rule - 0 views

  • Ideally, she said, teachers are working in cross-disciplinary teams to decide how to balance those shared responsibilities in a solid curriculum.
  • And Ms. Highfill has not found the guidance on shared, cross-curricular responsibility to be translating into classroom reality. In her district, she said, "there still seems to be more of a focus on English teachers' using nonfiction in classrooms than the other content areas stepping up to the plate."
  • such titles are meant for classes other than English, and seeing them as texts that displace works like The Catcher in the Rye takes titles out of context and ignores the messages of the standards document as a whole.
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • teachers and local administrators are the ones who must decide how to share responsibility for the increased emphasis on nonfiction. "If a lot of good, close reading of high-quality, challenging texts is going on in science and history classes," she said, "then English/language arts teachers need to carry less of that responsibility."
  • It is English/language arts teachers who will be held accountable for the results, which will drive what happens in their classrooms week to week, he said.
Christian Howd

How to Make American Teens Smarter - The Daily Beast - 51 views

  • "People don't really understand the nature of reading. They feel that reading is a skill, that it's transferable, so once you're a good reader, you can read anything that's put in front of you," says Daniel Willingham, a University of Virginia cognitive psychologist who focuses on K-12 education. "But that's only true for decoding—what you learn until grade three or four. After that, when you see good readers versus poor readers, what you're looking at is mostly differences in the knowledge that kids bring to the reading. It's easy to read something when you already know something about the topic. And if you don't know about the topic, it's utterly opaque to you."
  • That's why children should read newspapers and magazines, texts about nature and technology, and biographies—genres that increase real-world knowledge. This is especially important for poor children, who may not be exposed to as much "background" information at home: the random vocabulary, facts, and associations that make it easier to do well on tests like the NAEP and SAT, and to succeed in the workplace.
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    Americans may be reading more words today than ever before, but the content is less challenging. Dana Goldstein on kids' dismal reading scores-and a movement to get them to put down Twilight and pick up nonfiction.
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    You're absolutely right! Our students need to be provided opportunities to read a variety of text!
Miss OConnor

DAWCL Search Page - 16 views

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    databas of award winning children's lit. Search engine for children and YA lit, and nonfiction. YEAH
Amy Roediger

Reading Strategies for 'Informational Text' - NYTimes.com - 247 views

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    Several methods to help students read and understand nonfiction material.
Lynn Nesbit

Nonfiction Curriculum Enhanced Reading Skills in New York City Schools - NYTimes.com - 7 views

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    common core
Brianna Crowley

The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction - NYTimes.com - 6 views

  • The brain, it seems, does not make much of a distinction between reading about an experience and encountering it in real life; in each case, the same neurological regions are stimulated. Keith Oatley, an emeritus professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Toronto (and a published novelist), has proposed that reading produces a vivid simulation of reality, one that “runs on minds of readers just as computer simulations run on computers.” Fiction — with its redolent details, imaginative metaphors and attentive descriptions of people and their actions — offers an especially rich replica. Indeed, in one respect novels go beyond simulating reality to give readers an experience unavailable off the page: the opportunity to enter fully into other people’s thoughts and feelings.
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    Science is supporting the idea of descriptive, narrative passages as providing different brain stimulation from simply nonfiction or informative reading. 
anonymous

Kountze in the News: Effing the Ineffable (An East Texas Revery) | text2cloud - 13 views

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    For teachers working with memoir and teachers interested in archival research, this might be of interest: a multimedia composing project that works with the journals and correspondence of a southern writer who spent much of his life recollecting, in ever finer detail, his childhood during the Depression in East Texas. I teach creative nonfiction and I'm always trying to push myself to think about the possibilities new media composing affords that my students could explore.
victoria waddle

Teen/YA book reviews - 43 views

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    I've been reviewing books for teens for several years, and I hope you'll have a look. These are mostly teen fiction, but there is also nonfiction, adult books that have teen appeal and hi-lo books for English learners and other working on reading skills.
Amy Burns

Newsela | Nonfiction Literacy and Current Events - 47 views

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    Current events readings that allows selecting lexile to meet student needs.
Sydney Lacey

Teacher Magazine: Boys Trail Girls in Reading; Can Fart Jokes Help? - 32 views

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    Parents of reluctant readers complain that boys are forced to stick to stuffy required school lists that exclude nonfiction or silly subjects, or have teachers who cater to higher achievers and girls. They're hoping books that exploit boys' love of bodily functions and gross-out humor can close the gap.
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