Skip to main content

Home/ Diigo In Education/ Group items matching "nationalgeographic" in title, tags, annotations or url

Group items matching
in title, tags, annotations or url

Sort By: Relevance | Date Filter: All | Bookmarks | Topics Simple Middle
Mark Trerotola

http://www.nationalgeographic.com/ - 30 views

  •  
    A great website to review pictures and events from around the world.
Amy Roediger

Kids' Games, Animals, Photos, Stories, and More -- National Geographic Kids - 1 views

  •  
    The photos, activities, and games have great content. Plus, there are unusual science and animal videos too!
Glenn Hervieux

Nat Geo MapMaker Kits - National Geographic Society - 34 views

  •  
    Complete set of 11 map kits that students and teachers can use. Easy to assemble. The kits offer United States political and physical maps, world political and physical maps, maps of Asia, Africa, Europe, North and South America, Australia and Oceania, polar region maps, and maps of New England.
Glenn Hervieux

Americas MapMaker Kit - National Geographic Society - 18 views

  •  
    Could be student projects or teacher made. Easy to print and assemble.
Jason Schmidt

Underground Railroad--History of Slavery, Pictures, Information - 111 views

  •  
    Great interactive about the Underground Railroad.
Kelly Boushell

Xpedition Hall - 88 views

  •  
    Welcome to the interactive "museum" that takes you on geography journeys. Here you'll climb a mountain, hover over the Earth, speed across Europe, visit an archeological dig, and even order sushi-plus games, animations, and more!
Dianne Laycock

Mapping - National Geographic Education - 160 views

  •  
    Still in beta, but looking good.
James Spagnoletti

Göbekli Tepe -National Geographic Magazine--"Origin of Religion" - 36 views

    • James Spagnoletti
       
      Very cool photographs--take a look.  You will be doing your first art/artifact case studies this week. 
  • Most of the world's great religious centers, past and present, have been destinations for pilgrimages
  • Göbekli Tepe may be the first of all of them, the beginning of a pattern. What it suggests, at least to the archaeologists working there, is that the human sense of the sacred—and the human love of a good spectacle—may have given rise to civilization itself.
  • ...13 more annotations...
  • In the 1960s archaeologists from the University of Chicago had surveyed the region and concluded that Göbekli Tepe was of little interest. Disturbance was evident at the top of the hill, but they attributed it to the activities of a Byzantine-era military outpost.
  • Schmidt had come across the Chicago researchers' brief description of the hilltop and decided to check it out. On the ground he saw flint chips—huge numbers of them. "Within minutes of getting there," Schmidt says, he realized that he was looking at a place where scores or even hundreds of people had worked in millennia past.
  • s the months and years went by, Schmidt's team
  • found a second circle of stones, then a third, and then more. Geomagnetic surveys in 2003 revealed at least 20 rings piled together, higgledy-piggledy, under the earth
  • The pillars were big—the tallest are 18 feet in height and weigh 16 tons. Swarming over their surfaces was a menagerie of animal bas-reliefs, each in a different style, some roughly rendered, a few as refined and symbolic as Byzantine art.
  • The circles follow a common design. All are made from limestone pillars shaped like giant spikes or capital T's. Bladelike, the pillars are easily five times as wide as they are deep. They stand an arm span or more apart, interconnected by low stone walls. In the middle of each ring are two taller pillars, their thin ends mounted in shallow grooves cut into the floor.
  • "They hadn't yet mastered engineering." Knoll speculated that the pillars may have been propped up, perhaps by wooden posts.
  • To Schmidt, the T-shaped pillars are stylized human beings, an idea bolstered by the carved arms that angle from the "shoulders" of some pillars, hands reaching toward their loincloth-draped bellies.
  • The stones face the center of the circle—as at "a meeting or dance," Schmidt says—a representation, perhaps, of a religious ritual.
  • As for the prancing, leaping animals on the figures, he noted that they are mostly deadly creatures: stinging scorpions, charging boars, ferocious lions. The figures represented by the pillars may be guarded by them, or appeasing them, or incorporating them as totems.
  • The site may have been built, filled in, and built again for centuries.
  • Bewilderingly, the people at Göbekli Tepe got steadily worse at temple building.
  • The earliest rings are the biggest and most sophisticated, technically and artistically. As time went by, the pillars became smaller, simpler, and were mounted with less and less care. Finally the effort seems to have petered out altogether by 8200 B.C. Göbekli Tepe was all fall and no rise.
Gerald Carey

MapMaker Interactive - National Geographic Education - 103 views

  •  
    Very nice interactive illustrating things like sea surface temperatures, tectonic plates, human populations - for any part of the world (I'm from Australia and it even had us covered!)
Suzanne Rogers

National Geographic Education - National Geographic Education - 68 views

  • This is an early preview of our new website. You are seeing only some of the planned features and content. New things will continue to roll out—and your opinion matters!
eeeeeks !!!

MapMaker Page Maps - National Geographic Education - 132 views

  •  
    Awesome interactive geography mapping tool
  •  
    What a valuable site! Thank you.
1 - 20 of 45 Next › Last »
Showing 20 items per page