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Marsh Feldman

Online Education - Introducing the Microlecture Format - Open Education - 4 views

  • in online education “tiny bursts can teach just as well as traditional lectures when paired with assignments and discussions.” The microlecture format begins with a podcast that introduces a few key terms or a critical concept, then immediately turns the learning environment over to the students.
  • It clearly will not work for a course that is designed to feature sustained classroom discussions. And while the concept will work well when an instructor wants to introduce smaller chunks of information, it will likely not work very well when the information is more complex.
  • “It’s a framework for knowledge excavation,” Penrose tells Shieh. “We’re going to show you where to dig, we’re going to tell you what you need to be looking for, and we’re going to oversee that process.”
  • ...2 more annotations...
  • the microlecture format similarly requires teachers to get the key elements across in a very short amount of time. Most importantly, it forces educators to think in a new way.
  • 1. List the key concepts you are trying to convey in the 60-minute lecture. That series of phrases will form the core of your microlecture. 2. Write a 15 to 30-second introduction and conclusion. They will provide context for your key concepts. 3. Record these three elements using a microphone and Web camera. (The college information-technology department can provide advice and facilities.) If you want to produce an audio-only lecture, no Webcam is necessary. The finished product should be 60 seconds to three minutes long. 4. Design an assignment to follow the lecture that will direct students to readings or activities that allow them to explore the key concepts. Combined with a written assignment, that should allow students to learn the material. 5. Upload the video and assignment to your course-management software.
    • Marsh Feldman
       
      Good luck! Some of my (upper-division college) students don't even read the handouts I give them about assignments. Instead, they come during office hours and ask me to tell them how to do the assignment. When they do read things, like a textbook commonly used in 100-level courses, they misinterpret concepts through their own preconceptions. For example, the textbook says, "In this field there are these eight schools of thought: ...." So one student writes, "All eight schools are good ways to understand. There's no right way." (Even though each school is highly critical of the others.) The rest of the class comments, with things like "Good insight, Oscar." The textbook is about the field, so it doesn't go into any detail about the schools' criticisms ot the others. I can either tell the students or give them additional reading they probably won't do. Unless you can anticipate every student misunderstanding and have time for microlectures on every one of them, I think you'll need to do things the old fashioned way. At least this way you can make a valiant attempt at helping them understand the material correctly.
Virginia Meadow

Diigo Tutorials - 4 views

  • Diigo Tutorials Last edited September 19, 2008 More by Cliotech - Jennifer Dorman »
  • #6: Hate photocopying and assembling bulky, wasteful handouts? Save time and money. Just tag the pages, including highlights and notes, you want to include, then quickly Extract all the information under that tag. Give students CDs containing copies of the HTML file which has links to all the original pages and includes highlighted passages and your notes, or print copies as you need them. Watch this demo to see how it's done.
    • Donna Lacon
       
      Teacher uses for instruction
  • #11: Whether you write a blog for colleagues or to keep your students infromed, Diigo offers several useful features. You can blog directly from the Diigo toolbar, with a link to the page you're writing about as well as your highlights and notes already added to the post. Diigo will also send a linkroll of resources you've saved directly to your blog with no extra effort on your part.
  • ...3 more annotations...
  • As you build your lesson plan, tag each resource by unit or by week, highlight passages you want to draw students' attention to, and add your own notes to guide them. You can also 'chain' resources by simply adding a link to the next page at the bottom of each note. Diigo's flexibility gives you freedom to use just the structure that is right for your needs and the needs of your classes.
  • Keep up with changes, and always offer your students the latest, most accurate information. By finding frequently updated academic or educational sites on the Web, you can provide them with the most current and relevant material. All you need to do is delete links that have become useless, add the new ones you want, and when you extract the entire topic everything will be up to date.
  • Share anything you find with a colleague, including your highlights and notes, even if they don't use Diigo. Simply use the Forward feature, and Diigo will send anyone you choose a link to the original page along with the text you highlighted, your notes, and any comments you choose to add. All with no cutting, pasting, or going to another window to compose an e-mail.
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    Jennifer Dorman's Google Notebook listing Diigo Tutorials. Jennifer if obviously deep into diigo and generously sharing her resources in the best web 2.0 tradition. Check out the list of twelve uses for diigo at the bottom of the page! (I'll highlight a few.)
  •  
    How to get access to this demo?
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    tutorials for diigo
UN English Programme

Purdue Univeristy On-Line Writing Lab - 0 views

  •  
    Purdue University's Online Writing Lab (OWL) is an excellent resource for every type of English language learning activity, from writing to vocabulary building.
Kate Pok

Taking Lecture and Class Notes - 68 views

    • Kate Pok
       
      Useful site with handouts for students on note-taking.
GP withMdmLin

Edmodo | Home - 89 views

shared by GP withMdmLin on 28 Jan 11 - Cached
  • Flashbacks -
  • Flashbacks - Monday, February 21,2011
  • f Representatives
  • ...22 more annotations...
  • Tuesday -
  • Agenda -
  • PLN:
  • Experts:
  • Livebinder:
  • Experts & Websites:
  • PLN
  • Experts & Websites:
  • Livebinders:
  • PLN
  • Experts & Websites:
  • Livebinders:
  • PLN Personal Learning Network
  • PLN: Personal Learning Network
  • Experts & Websites:
  • Livebinders:
  • eWomen
    • Brenna Novak
       
      An example of teacher posting and student responses/posts in Edmodo
  • Me to 2* Science Diffusion, Osmosis, & Active Transport Notes Turned in (0) DUE: May 24, 2012 Please fill-in as we go through them in class. I will upload a separate document with the diagrams. I will create a handout of the diagrams so please DO NOT print from here. Diffusion, Osmosis, & Active Transport Notes... Show Full Post Show Less
    • Brenna Novak
       
      The pink highlight is an example of a homework/note posting in Edmodo. You can keep track of who has completed the assignment.
    • Joel Gogwim
       
      Its cool
    • Monica Del Castillo
       
      Nice thanks
    • Cathy Hopperstad
       
      Yes, how do you remove the stickies from my Edmodo page?
    • Roy Sovis
       
      Cathy, I loaded the Diigo toolbar in IE, Firefox, and Chrome. It's the only toolbar I use. In Firefox and IE, I click on the Diigo icon in the toolbar and mouse hover over "See All Annotations". Another menu will open in whcih you can select the setting you desire in regards to public and private annotations/sticky notes.
    • Brenna Novak
       
      I like using the highlighting and sticky notes. This can be a great tool to use with my students. Just like I am doing for Edmodo by pointing out the different features of the site.
    • Dan Warren
       
      OK. Nice. Now, how do I get rid of the notes floating on my Edmodo page?
    • A Kashdan
       
      I started using Diigo, but I have no idea why I'm seeing these notes.
    • carmelladoty
       
      Ok, I read the sticky notes, now how do I remove them?
    • Diego Tutor
       
      You can't remove them as they are not your notes, they were published by somebody else in a group where you have access to (Public, Diigo in Education, etc.). You have the option to hide them through the Diigo toolbar, or you can abandon the group not to see any notes from any member in it. :)
  • Utilitarian education
  •  
    quotes and quotes and quotes...
Sean Breves

Devil's Arithmetic Web Quest - 121 views

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    This is a webquest that I created on the Devil's Arithmetic novel. Feel free to borrow some of the items
Marc Patton

Scratch Curriculum Guide Draft | ScratchEd - 134 views

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    This Scratch curriculum guide provides an introduction to creative computing with Scratch, using a design-based learning approach. The guide is organized as a series of twenty 60-minute sessions, and includes session plans, handouts, projects, and videos. The 20 sessions presented in this guide are organized into 5 topics: introductionartsstoriesgamesfinal project
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    A design-based introduction to computational thinking with Scratch
Tamara Connors

Digitally Speaking / Social Bookmarking and Annotating - 58 views

  • Diigo's "group forums" are threaded, allowing users to start new strands or to reply to strands started by others.
  • powerful learning depends on the quality of the conversation that develops around the content being studied together. 
  • This handout--including a description of each role and a group sign-up sheet---can be used with student social bookmarking efforts: Handout_SocialBookmarkingRoles.pdf
  • ...5 more annotations...
  • Captain Cannonball should find four or five key points in a shared reading to highlight and craft initial questions for other readers to consider
  • hallenging the thinking of peers in the conversation.  Directly responding to comments made by others, the Provocateur works to remind everyone that there are two sides to every story.    
  • for connections.  Middle Men
  • question statements made and conclusions drawn throughout a shared reading.
  • dentify important "takeaways" that a group can learn from
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    Fred, What an incredible resource. It has changed my thinking about collaborative annotation technologies. Thank you! -tbf Todd Finley http://bit.ly/Hfs8N
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    The driving force behind the Web 2.0 revolution is a spirit of intellectual philanthropy and collective intelligence that is made possible by new technologies for communication, collaboration and information management.  One of the best examples of collective intelligence in action are the wide range of social bookmarking applications that have been embraced in recent years.
Rod White

Teaching and technology ~ presentations and resources for educators - 77 views

  • During the last six or so years I have created a number of 'how-to' documents and presentations for a variety of web based and related technologies. They are available from the various workshop web pages however I thought it might prove helpful to link to all the documents from a single page. Some of my workshop participants have referred to these documents as 'cheat sheets'.
  • ~ www.larkin.net.au ~ | Welcome | About Me | Technology | History | Galleries | Music | Blog | Presentation and workshop documents During the last six or so years I have created a number of 'how-to' documents and presentations for a variety of web based and related technologies. They are available from the various workshop web pages however I thought it might prove helpful to link to all the documents from a single page. Some of my workshop participants have referred to these documents as 'cheat sheets'. Web 2.0Read~Write Web Overview Information sharing
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    great clearinghouse of tutorials & handouts from presentations on many tools
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    online workshops
Brendan Gallagher

Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design Online - 56 views

  • Don’t assume that anyone will read anything written in a handout, computer screen, or PowerPoint presentation. Learners today scan and process information differently. Getting through to your audience, designing information that is easy to process, and creating a path for the information to move into the long term memory, is your job (it should be your passion) and it must be approached as a constantly evolving process.
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    this looks really interesting, but the link just leads to a student login screen at RMCAD. can you provide another link? thanks!
Mu He

TagMyDoc - 79 views

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    A great online tool for uploading, storage and sharing documents by link or QR code. Simply upload your item to generate both to share. http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/ICT+%26+Web+Tools
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    Adds a QR code to document that when scanned provides a copy of the document. Could be added to the syllabus and other handouts.
University Graduate School

Taylor & Francis Online :: Supervision and scholarly writing: writing to learn-learning to write - Reflective Practice - Volume 6, Issue 4 - 0 views

  • students’ difficulties with the academic genre should be considered to be the norm, rather than the exception.
    • University Graduate School
       
      Step away from problematising writing and toward it being normal to seek help
  • mechanical errors r
  • errors in the microstructure of writing
  • ...77 more annotations...
  • inconsistencies in writin
  • macrostructure of writing
  • quality and clarity of purpose
  • substantive general writing errors
  • publication, authorship, training and fairness
  • plagiarism
  • formal writing courses and reading lists, writing activities, and peer writing groups
  • Ideally, the supervisor provides a writing role mode
  • fallacious to assume that supervisors are necessarily scholarly writers
    • University Graduate School
       
      relying on spvrs to be writing mentors does not always work, may have own issues with writing/lack of confidence
  • apprenticeship model can be ineffective
  • a passive role in improving their writing
  • tudents and supervisors need to master a range of writing task
  • benefit of naming what will be attended to and framing its context accrues through the process of planning, action and reflection
  • implicit contractual relationship between my students and me
  • supervisor
  • provide feedback
  • conceptu
  • methodological
  • I conceived postgraduate students’ writing as similar to that of an academic co‐author.
    • University Graduate School
       
      assumed they were more developed as writers than they actually were
  • initially corrected all errors
  • ttle emphasis to these errors in subsequent interactions
  • explored whether these were careless errors or whether the students had difficulty with particular aspects of writin
  • students assumed some responsibility for proofreading
  • cholarly writing in a thesis involves much more than a set of discrete writing tasks
  • heightened awareness of individual differences in students as writers
  • dependent writer
  • ‘writer’s block’ that could be overcome by breaking writing down into subtasks
  • copious notes
  • detailed note‐taking limited her interaction
  • brief summary of the key points on my written response to her drafts
  • action plan
  • writing block initially posed a major ethical dilemma for me because the ethical guidelines of authorship restrict the writing that should be undertaken by a superviso
  • not writing per se that underpinned Denise’s writing block but a lack of knowledge about the content and organization of a particular writing task.
    • University Graduate School
       
      Writers block can come from lack of knowledge/confidence in the writing process, rather than lack of subject knowledge
  • confident writer
  • published during his doctoral studies
  • nadvertently engaged in unethical writing behaviour by including me as a co‐author without my permission
  • difficulties with all aspects of the macrostructur
  • epeat sections of writing from earlier chapters
  • replace repeated text with concise summaries or use cross‐referencing
  • tendency to rush through corrections, which often resulted in many issues identified on a previous draft remaining unresolved
  • writing was often submitted and returned electronically using the ‘comments’ and ‘track changes’ tools in Microsoft Word.
    • University Graduate School
       
      use of technology to produce tracked drafts/version control
  • resistant writer
  • acknowledged herself to be a poor write
  • writing supp
  • oral and written feedback
  • email guidance, sessions where writing was modeled and her writing scaffolded, and handouts on writing style.
  • specialist assistance
  • r lack of commitment to improving the quality of subsequent drafts
  • argumentative stance towards writing feedback
  • my colleague and I decided that we were no longer prepared to supervise Rita.
  • imited writing progress
  • , Rita had failed to adequately demonstrate her writing capability as a doctoral candidat
  • sporadic writer
  • repeatedly failed to meet negotiated deadlines
  • supervisor, it was difficult to maintain interest in and respond to Sherry’s work because of the time lag between each piece of writing
  • enlisted an experienced supervisor to act as my mentor
  • forewarned
  • Sherry’s approach to writing was likely to result in a lengthy completion time and she needed to accept the responsibility for managing her writing tasks.
  • emotional excitement of writing up a thesis and the ensuing motivation
  • lacked
  • This trail of documentation
  • importance of
  • highlighted student‐centred writing issues
  • dentified broader issues that also needed to be accommodated in supervision
  • confidence in writing does not necessarily equate with capability.
  • uture directions
  • upport students
  • ncouraging them to participate in activities designed to support scholarly writing,
  • community of support for each othe
    • University Graduate School
       
      rationale for peer support groups
  • Technology
  • virtual community of student writers
  • Ethical writing
  • cant attention in postgraduate training to ethical practices in writing
  • explore the ethical standards that are in operation in our local academic community.
  • underpinned by a performance‐orientation
  • ssues of concern related to students’ scholarly writing were identified.
  • eper understanding of the breadth of issues related to the supervision of postgraduate writing
Kate Pok

Assigning Collaborative Writing - 4 views

  •  
    Great tips for assigning collaborative writing.
psmiley

FreeBIEs | Project Based Learning | BIE - 5 views

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    PBL website
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